Courses in College

Be inspired by the gamut of community college courses, from the arts to technical training. This section will cover everything from remedial classes to continuing education. Community colleges offer courses for youth and teens, individuals looking for a new hobby or skill, or those behind bars looking for a second chance.

View the most popular articles in Courses in College:

Learn Homesteading Skills at Your Local Community College

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Learn Homesteading Skills at Your Local Community College
Homesteading is finding newfound popularity, and some community colleges are helping students live off the land once again, whether they live in a big city or rural village.
Homesteading began in this country with the Homestead Act that was signed into law by President Lincoln in 1862. According to this legislation, people were allowed to obtain free land in exchange for the development of a homestead farm within a set time frame. If they successfully started their farm, the land it sat upon was theirs to keep.

Although homesteading laws are no longer in effect throughout most of Canada and the United States, the idea of homesteading appears to be catching on once again. We will take a look at the new definition of homesteading and visit some community colleges that are teaching students how to successfully adopt this way of life.
 
This video explains homesteading.
 
 
Today's Homesteading
 
While homesteading in the 19th century was about staking your claim to a piece of land, today's definition is more about finding self-sufficiency in a simpler way of life. According to Modern Homesteading Today, modern homesteaders grow their own food, make their own clothing and even supply their own electricity to their homes through solar or wind power. Homesteading allows individuals to abandon the break-neck speed lifestyles common today, in favor of a simpler life living off the land and growing together as a family.
 
Homesteading can be done in any area of the country, including the heart of big cities. In fact, urban homesteading has become a popular concept, as more city dwellers learn to live self sufficiently as much as possible, despite
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The Attack on Repeating Classes: Heed these Warnings

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The Attack on Repeating Classes: Heed these Warnings
If you are considering repeating community college courses, think again. Community colleges are starting to put limitations on repeated courses, and these classes could impact your financial aid as well.
Community colleges have always been safe havens where struggling students can bring themselves up to academic par before transferring to a four-year university. In some cases, this might mean repeating a course a number of times before getting the required grade to advance to the next level. However, budget constrictions are impacting repeat classes for students across the country, with some left wondering how they will complete their community college program. We will take a look at both sides of this issue to find out how institutions are struggling to balance their commitment to student achievement with their bottom line.
 
This video explains what to do when you fail a class.
 
 
California Setting Limits
 
California is one of the first to look into setting limits on repeat courses at community colleges across the state. According to a report at Inside Higher Ed, the California Community Colleges Chancellor's Office is looking into the feasibility of limiting the number of times students can repeat courses within their college system. Currently, a small number of California community college students may repeat a class as many as five times or more during their college career.
 
A spokesman for the chancellor's office, Terri Carbaugh, told Inside Higher Ed that the office was looking into the feasibility of a regulation limiting the number of times students can retake courses to save taxpayer dollars. The office would like to set a limit of four retakes, and then community colleges would have
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Should an Islam Class be Taught by an Islamophobe?

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Should an Islam Class be Taught by an Islamophobe?
A proposed Islam course at Lane Community College is gaining national controversy as the suppossed anti-Islamic background of the instructor is revealed. Learn more about the sparking debate and the future of the course.
It all started when Lane Community College in Oregon decided to offer a non-credit course titled, "What is Islam?" The instructor of the course, Barry Sommer, had submitted an application to teach a class in Islam for the community college, which the college accepted. However, before the course had a single sign-up, the college put the brakes on the offering. Apparently, officials of the school learned some potentially disturbing facts about Sommer and decided it was best to nip the brewing controversy in the bud.

The Facts
 
Eugene resident Barry Sommer submitted an application in October of this year to teach a class on Islam at Lane Community College. The school typically offers non-credit courses for interested students throughout the year, and many of these are taught by qualified residents of the community, rather than college professors. According to a report at World Net Daily, approval for the course came, and Sommer began preparations for teaching. When the course went online on the college website, Sommer also sent out a press release to alert others to his offering.
 
Once the details were announced, a local news station asked to interview Sommer. As the course became more public, so did Sommer's background. It turns out the Sommer may have been involved in organizations that were perceived as anti-Islamic. Once the news spread that Sommer was a potentially controversial figure in the Islamic community, Lane pulled the plug on the course.
 
This short video offers an overview of Islam.
 
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Studying Ghosts: Paranormal Investigation Courses at Community College

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Studying Ghosts: Paranormal Investigation Courses at Community College
Ghostbusting may be as easy as taking paranormal investigation courses at your local community college. Learn about programs around the country that are piquing interest in the paranormal.
Community colleges have always been at the forefront of training students for both traditional and innovative careers...and ghost-busting is no exception!  Indeed, a handful of community colleges are actually offering paranormal studies to train students in the interesting field of ghost-busting.   
 
Be spooked or inspired by the paranormal studies available at the following community colleges. Could researching ghosts be the right career choice for you?
 
 
This Indiana institution is known for many strong fields of study, but recently, the college added paranormal investigation courses to its catalog. These courses, according to the Kokomo Perspective, are designed to explore the world of paranormal behavior in a way never seen before.
 
The teacher of the course, Al Taylor, is the PR director of Indiana Ghost Trackers. Taylor will lead students on an exploration of paranormal research that will include conduct and safety, as well as the proper use of paranormal equipment.
 
The courses are offered at two different Ivy Tech campuses and are done in collaboration with the Kokomo Region of the Department of Workforce and Economic Development. This organization offer provides career training solutions to help fill the needs of today's employers.
 
 
 
In North Carolina, Alamance Community College is offering its own brand of paranormal training. The school's current class in paranormal investigations has been consistently topping the list as one of the most popular course offerings at Alamance.
 
The course is taught by Heather Garner of Grahan, the
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OSHA Training at Community College: Making Workplace Safety Easier

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OSHA Training at Community College: Making Workplace Safety Easier
Businesses and prospective employees need to look no further than community colleges for valuable, certified, and affordable OSHA training.
The Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, also known as OSHA, was established to ensure a safe and healthy working environment for working men and women, according to the U.S. Department of Labor website. The act is designed to provide the necessary training and education to maintain a high level of safety in a wide range of industries.
 
To work in these industries, new employees are often required to attend OSHA training prior to beginning their new job. Today, there are plenty of options in OSHA training, since community colleges across the country have stepped up to answer the call for skilled laborers who understand the importance of safety on the job.
 
This video explains what OSHA is.
 
 
Determining a Need
 
OSHA includes a specific set of training guidelines that must be applied to all businesses, from the employer down through all of the employees. The guidelines include:
  • Determining whether there is a need for training
  • Identifying training needs, goals and objectives
  • Developing learning activities and conducting training
  • Evaluating the effectiveness of the program and creating improvements when necessary
The model set forth by the U.S. Department of Labor makes it much easier for smaller companies to conduct their own training without going to the added expense of hiring professional trainers or purchasing expensive materials. However, the value from utilizing a community college program for OSHA training often makes this path the best choice for companies of all sizes.
 
Community colleges take the guesswork out of the process by providing programs
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Learn how President Obama, who is considered the "Community College President," has rightly earned his title based upon his proposed funding and support for community colleges throughout the country.
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Courses in College

REMEDIAL EDUCATION
60% of community college students need remedial courses. This section covers the classes and new developments to help students who need remedial coursework. Learn why the gap exists, how schools are combatting it and what you can do to avoid remedial classes. Get tips on mastering college math, learn what you can do to prevent repeating a class and hear what the experts have to say about remedial class placement.
Why Do 60% of Community College Students Need Remedial Coursework?
Why Do 60% of Community College Students Need Remedial Coursework?
Mastering Math: A Guide to Passing Your Community College Math Requirements
Mastering Math: A Guide to Passing Your Community College Math Requirements
Too Many Students Placed in Remedial Courses? Studies Say Yes
Too Many Students Placed in Remedial Courses? Studies Say Yes
SUPPORT FOR BUSINESSES
Local business are taking advantage of special training programs at community colleges. From OSHA training to a collaboration with Goldman Sachs, community colleges are training employees for small and large businesses across the country.
OSHA Training at Community College: Making Workplace Safety Easier
OSHA Training at Community College: Making Workplace Safety Easier
Calling All Entrepreneurs!  How Community Colleges Can Help You Start Your Business
Calling All Entrepreneurs! How Community Colleges Can Help You Start Your Business
Retrain For A New Career In Weeks? Yes!
Retrain For A New Career In Weeks? Yes!
FUN & ELECTIVE CLASSES
Community colleges offer a gamut of fun and interesting classes, and we give ideas that may strike inspiration for your elective choices. Learn homesteading skills, study paranormal investigating, or earn a scuba diving certificate all at a community college near you. This sections identifies some of the fun non-credit courses available at your local campus.
Studying Ghosts: Paranormal Investigation Courses at Community College
Studying Ghosts: Paranormal Investigation Courses at Community College
Choosing Electives for a Rounded Education
Choosing Electives for a Rounded Education
Earn Your Scuba Diving Certification at Your Local Community College
Earn Your Scuba Diving Certification at Your Local Community College
CONTINUING EDUCATION
Community colleges are filled with continuing education opportunities. Whether you are looking for a resume booster, new skills to earn a promotion or want to earn your degree while incarcerated, community college may be a good choice for you.
Retraining at Community Colleges: A Status Update
Retraining at Community Colleges: A Status Update
Should an Islam Class be Taught by an Islamophobe?
Should an Islam Class be Taught by an Islamophobe?