Kids and Teens

Community college is not just for adults. Learn about all the programs available to children and teens too. From aiding high school dropouts to ramped up summer school programs, community colleges work hard to encourage the pursuit of higher education to students of all ages.
View the most popular articles in Kids and Teens:
Updated |
Freshman Year in College Looks More and More Like High School
Nearly 52 percent of community college students in the United States begin their freshman year in at least one remedial class. These courses, which help students acquire knowledge and skills they should have acquired in high school, do not count toward their degree requirements. As a result, students are taking longer than ever to obtain their degree, if they obtain one at all.
Each year students and colleges in the United States spend about $3 billion on remediation. Remedial courses, or college prep courses as they are known at some institutions, are required for students who do not meet pre-determined performance standards for admittance into a college-level course. Most often, community college students who require remediation need it in English or math, or both.
 
The most recent statistics on the matter are sobering: About half of all community college students are placed in remedial courses, which 40 percent of students never complete. Nearly 70 percent of these students never make it to a college-level math class either. Further compounding the problem is that adjunct faculty members, who typically have the least experience teaching needy populations and often suffer from a general lack of institutional support, teach approximately 75 percent of remedial courses offered at community colleges.
 
This video claims that remedial education costs community colleges billions.
 
This is a problem seen nationwide. Over 46 percent of college-bound students in Maryland need some form of remediation. In California, the need for remediation lengthens the time students need to attain an associate’s degree by one full year and adds 20 credits to their coursework. In Virginia, 77 percent of students in the state’s community college system that are referred to remedial math courses do not complete them within three years. All this added coursework causes budgetary concerns for colleges that have to add more and more sections
. . .read more
Updated |
Graduate from Community College Before High School
High school students across the nation are enrolling in college credit classes and finding that graduating from college before even graduating from high school is a very real possibility.
Community college campuses have historically had a reputation for having many older students who have returned to college after raising a family, serving in the military, or working for many years. While the average age of a community college student is still 29, there are many younger faces beginning to walk the halls of community colleges. In fact, from 2002 to 2011, the number of high school students enrolled in college courses increased by 67 percent, to 1.3 million students.
 
High School Partnerships Fuel Enrollment
 
This shift towards a younger student population is largely the result of partnerships with local high schools. Kids as young as 13 and 14 years of age are enrolling in college courses and earning what’s known as dual credit – courses that count toward both high school and college graduation requirements. General education courses such as English, maths, and science are far and away the most popular courses taken by high school-aged students. But others take advantage of non-core course offerings such as humanities, fine arts, and physical education, as well. The result is that students are graduating with an associate’s degree before they even graduate from high school.
 
Baltimore County’s Diploma to Degree Program
 
This video explains the pros and cons of earning college credits in high school.
 
 
In Baltimore County, Maryland, students who demonstrate exceptional academic skills can enroll in the Diploma to Degree Program. The program represents a partnership between several local public high schools and
. . .read more
Updated |
Youth on Campus: How Young is Too Young for Community College?
Can pre-teens enroll in community college? A 12-year-old in Florida recently went to court when the local community college wouldn’t allow her to dual-enroll because she was too young. In California, a child prodigy is about to graduate from UCLA after starting at community college at the age of eight.
According to the American Association of Community Colleges, the average age for a student at a two-year institution is 29. But what about those who fall well outside of that average? While most would agree that you are never too old to learn something new, some youngsters trying to move up the academic ladder have faced major hurdles. Others have persevered, proving that higher learning is advantageous for students of all ages.

 
12-Year-Old Denied College Access in Florida
 
Issues regarding young students have plagued colleges for some time, but one recent report that made national headlines was that of Anastasia Megan of Center Hill, Florida. At the age of 12, Anastasia, or “Annie” as she is called by friends and family, was more than ready for the academic rigors of college. She had completed most of her secondary work through homeschooling and had aced three college placement tests when she applied for enrollment at Lake-Sumter Community College.
 
The college, however, didn’t see things quite that way. According to a report at the Orlando Sentinel, instead of the school readily admitting the young woman, they set up multiple roadblocks to keep her off the college campus. First, the college voiced concern about Megan’s social maturity and then worried about her physical safety on a campus filled with older students. Next, the school required one of Megan’s parents to attend class with her and then decided a parent wouldn’t be allowed into the classroom.
 
Complaint filed with Department of Education
 
. . .read more
Updated |
New Survey Shows Community College Students Feel Unprepared for the Rigors of Higher Education
Are you ready for community college? If your answer is no, then you are not alone. Learn about the second annual Pearson Foundation Community College survey that shows many high school graduates do not feel prepared for college-level work.
Despite the fact that community colleges are seeing higher levels of enrollment than ever before, not all these new students of higher education are getting the type of college experience for which they were hoping. According to a new survey conducted by Pearson Foundation and Harris Interactive, many community college students feel unprepared for the rigors of college coursework. Students are also getting shut out of classes at many schools, leaving many waiting much longer than two years to complete their degree and certification programs.
 

The recent survey was conducted online by Harris Interactive on behalf of Pearson Foundation in August and September, 2011. The survey polled 1,205 community college students on various issues regarding school, including ease of getting necessary courses and the level of difficult of college-level coursework compared to high school classes. The results of the survey have been published at the websites for both Pearson Foundation and Harris Interactive. A number of news sources have reported on the findings as well.

Preparation Lacking for Students Entering Community College

 According to the Harris Interactive website, the survey found that more than half (52%) of all community college students felt unprepared for college-level coursework. Many felt their high schools did not adequately prepare them for higher education by placing a higher emphasis on basic skills, offering more courses and placing a greater challenge into courses that were offered.
 
Amy Evans, a spokeswoman for Cisco College in Texas, told the Abilene Reporter-News that about one-third of the students that enroll
. . .read more
Updated |
Talent Search Program Helps Students Succeed in Higher Education
Learn more about the Talent Search Program, which specifically targets potential students from disadvantaged backgrounds and offers them financial, academic and career counseling to help them finish high school and pursue a postsecondary education.
There is no doubt that success in college begins at the secondary level, with proper course selection, stellar academic performance and career focus during the high school years. However, students that come from disadvantaged backgrounds, or who have never had a family member attend college, face nearly insurmountable obstacles when preparing for the possibility of postsecondary education. To give some of these students a chance at a college degree, the Talent Search Program was born.
 

What is the Talent Search Program?

According to the Ed.gov website, the Talent Search Program is designed to help disadvantaged youth who show the potential to succeed in postsecondary education. This program identifies youth that fall into this category and provides them with the financial, career and academic support they need to succeed in high school and beyond. Talent Search also looks for individuals who have not yet completed their secondary or postsecondary education and provides necessary resources to encourage those individuals to return to the world of academia to earn their high school equivalency and a postsecondary degree or certificate.

The programs offered through the Talent Search Program include:
  • Aptitude assessments and counseling to prepare students for the rigors of college
  • Mentoring and tutorial programs to come alongside students and help them succeed
  • Counseling services to assist students with financial challenges that might arise
  • Career exploration resources to help students plan for their futures
  • Information about various postsecondary options available
  • Alternative education options for those returning to finish their secondary education
These programs are all geared toward helping students
. . .read more
View Pages:<<Prev  1 2 3  Next>>
Recent Articles
To accommodate students' schedules, along with growing enrollment rates, community colleges are offering classes in the late evening. Learn more about why you may be taking midnight classes at a campus near you.
An interesting case arose this week over a community college student in North Carolina that posted a rant about a new campus policy on his Facebook page. The student was suspended for two semesters, but quickly reinstated amid a flurry of protests over his free speech rights.
We examine the advantages and disadvantages of using online classes to earn your two-year degree.
Courses in College

Kids and Teens