Understanding the Different Types of College Degrees and How to Choose

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Understanding the Different Types of College Degrees and How to Choose
Choosing a college major can be tough, but you also need to think about choosing the right type of degree. Keep reading to learn about the five different types of college degrees and your earning potential for each one.

The world of higher education is a wide one with many different options. Whether you choose to attend community college or a traditional college or university, there are a number of different degrees to choose from and each one offers unique potential in terms of your future career.   

Before you apply to college, you should consider your field as well as the type of degree you intend to pursue. Not every job requires a college degree, but many do – there are also many careers where you are unlikely to succeed without an advanced degree.

Keep reading to learn about the five different types of college degree, the common career paths for each of those degrees and how to choose the right degree for you.

The Five Types of College Degrees

One of the main benefits of earning a college degree is that it increases your earning potential – college graduates simply earn more than non-degree holders in most fields. Outside of higher income potential, the process of earning your degree opens you up to a whole new world of learning and you develop skills you may not have had before. Having a degree typically means better job security, more career options, and more personal development along the way.

The benefits of having a degree are many, but not all degrees are created equal. Here is an overview of the five different types of college degree:

  1. Associate Degree (ex: Associate of Arts or Associate of Science)
  2. Bachelor’s Degree (ex: Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of
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Can You Still Get into Community College with Bad Grades?
To a graduating high school senior, grades are everything. But how do colleges view bad grades and can you still get into college without a perfect GPA? Keep reading to find out.

High school is a stressful period for young adults. Between the struggles with changing hormones, social pressures, and academics all rolled into a four-year span, it can be quite overwhelming.

Some students handle the pressure of high school better than others, and some are simply better at school for whatever reason. Poor grades are sometimes viewed as an indicator of laziness, but that is not always the case. For many students, poor grades are a small piece of the puzzle. Many students struggle with basic study skills or test taking while others have difficulty with learning disabilities, distractions at home, or other issues that affect their academic success.

For many students, getting good grades feels like the only thing that matters. After all, good grades are what gets a student into college. Or are they?

College admissions have changed significantly over the years. Today, colleges want to see their students be well-rounded individuals with real-life experience and a direction for their future. Grades are still a key indicator of discipline and academic potential, but they aren’t everything. Even if you have poor grades, you can still get into college.

In this article, we’ll talk about the importance of grades and how much they really matter for college applications. We’ll also discuss some strategies to address poor grades in your college applications to increase your chances of being accepted.

Do Grades Really Matter for Community College?

There is a common misconception that community college is somehow below traditional colleges and universities. While community colleges accept

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Is Community College the Best Option for Homeschoolers?
Though homeschoolers often get a bad rap, they are some of the highest performing students in the country - especially in college. Keep reading to learn more about community college for homeschoolers including tips for applying and preparing for college.

Community college has gained a reputation for being the ideal option for nontraditional students. Single parents, retirees, and individuals hoping to switch careers are some of the biggest beneficiaries of community college but there is another group of students to think about – homeschoolers.

According to the National Household Education Survey Program (NHES), there were over 1.7 million K-12 students being homeschooled in the United States. This number represents an 18% increase since the previous survey taken in 2007. As both of these studies demonstrate, homeschooling has become increasingly more popular since it became a legal option in all 50 states in 1993.

There are many reasons why parents choose to homeschool their children. For some, it is a matter of wanting greater control over their child’s curriculum and schedule or a desire to create a program adapted to their child’s needs. Homeschooling can help parents create a stronger bond with their children and it gives children the freedom to learn at their own pace. Homeschooling does come with its challenges, however, particularly when it comes to college applications.

College applications for homeschoolers are not as complex as they used to be, but it still takes time to complete them. More homeschoolers are turning to community college over traditional four-year colleges and universities. Keep reading to learn why and how to prepare your homeschooler for college.

Surprising Facts About Homeschoolers in College

Though more than 3% of the K-12 student population in the United States is homeschooled, many people still misunderstand this educational

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How Community Colleges Are Changing Remedial Education
Remedial education exists to help struggling students succeed in college-level classes. Unfortunately, the existing model may be doing more harm than good. Keep reading to learn more about the history of remedial education and what community colleges are doing to change it.

Community colleges provide educational opportunities for many students who might not otherwise have access to higher education. First-generation college students, single parents, and other nontraditional students make up a significant percentage of the community college population.

For those who enter community college straight after high school and for those who have already completed some higher-level course work, community college is a less challenging transition than for those who have been out of school for years or who are pursuing higher education for the first time. Many nontraditional students struggle when there is a gap between what they already know when they set foot on campus for the first time and what they are expected to know.

That’s where remedial education comes in. Unfortunately, a review of years of remedial education has revealed that, instead of helping students succeed in their college careers, it acts as a brick wall that prevents them moving forward. Keep reading to learn more about the history of remedial education and what community colleges are doing to change it.

What is Remedial Education?

Remedial education exists at all levels of education from grade school to post-secondary education. A remedial program is typically designed to close the gap between what a student knows and what they are expected to know, typically in math and reading courses. Simply put, remedial instruction is designed to help struggling students strengthen their basic skills to help them succeed.

In a primary education setting, remedial programs often serve to help struggling students improve their reading

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An In-Depth Guide to Financing Options for Community College
Attending college is expensive but there are options for financing beyond just student loans. Keep reading to learn more.

College tuition is not cheap, and the cost seems to rise with each passing year. According to College Board, the average yearly rate for in-state tuition at a public college is over $25,000. At a private college, tuition can cost upwards of $50,000 per year.

If you are determined to go to college but you don’t have an extra $25k to $50k per year to spend, you might want to consider community college as an alternative. The average cost for community college tuition is under $5,000 for in-state students and under $10,000 for out of state students. Even if you complete your general education requirements and then transfer to a four-year school, you’ll still be saving a lot of money.

While attending community college is much more affordable than paying for a four-year university, it is still a significant expense. Keep reading to learn about your options for financing community college including common myths about scholarships, the different kinds of grants, and tips for reducing your costs while in school.

Debunking Common Myths About College Scholarships

The word “scholarship” is a dangling carrot for high school students preparing for college. While most colleges and universities offer them, they often seem like they are just out of reach. Though you may not realize it, many community colleges offer scholarships as well and there are always private scholarships to consider.

Unfortunately, many students misunderstand certain facts about scholarships which could prevent them from obtaining one. Here are five common myths about college scholarships and the truth

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Choosing a college major can be tough, but you also need to think about choosing the right type of degree. Keep reading to learn about the five different types of college degrees and your earning potential for each one.