How to Survive Community College with Roommates

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How to Survive Community College with Roommates
Living with roommates is part of an authentic college experience, but is it an option for community college students? Read on to learn about housing options in community college and to learn how to survive the year with roommates.

College is expensive, there’s no doubt about it. Because tuition prices are constantly on the rise, many graduating high school seniors choose to attend community college. Community college is a convenient and affordable way to obtain a 2-year degree or to complete some prerequisites before transferring to a 4-year college. But you still have to consider the cost of living.

Many community college students choose to live at home while studying to compound the money-saving benefits of attending community college. If you’re going to a school a little further from home, however, or if you’re looking for a more authentic college experience, you might be looking into other options. Whether you choose to live on campus or off, consider living with a roommate to save money.

In this article, we’ll explore the benefits of living with a roommate and talk about the pros and cons of living on campus versus off-campus living. We’ll also provide you with some simple tips for keeping the peace while living with a roommate while attending community college.

What Are the Benefits of Living with Roommates?

Everyone who’s ever lived with another person has horror stories about awkward or frustrating interactions. The truth is that sharing a space with another person is likely to bring up a few challenges. But what are the benefits of living with a roommate?

Here are a few of the good things to consider:

  • Having a roommate to split costs can save you a lot of money on rent, utilities, and even everyday
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Are Graduate Degrees in Nursing Worth It?
Some people seem to graduate high school but never really leave the academic world behind. No matter what career you pursue, there are plenty of opportunities for higher education, but are they worth it. Read on to learn about graduate degrees in nursing and whether they are worth the time, cost, and effort.

Though doctors often get the glory for healing the sick, it is often the nurses who work with them who provide most of the day-to-day care. Nurses work long hours doing thankless work and, many would agree, for less pay than they deserve. These things are what make many people who work in the nursing field consider going back to school for a graduate degree.

Graduate degrees in nursing are very popular and obtaining a degree can boost your opportunities to get a better, higher-paying job. There are, however, no guarantees. Before you pursue a graduate degree in nursing, you should take a close look at the details and determine whether it is really worth it.

In this article, we’ll explore the details for some of the most popular graduate degrees in the nursing field and whether they are worth the cost. We’ll also talk about details like how long it takes to obtain a nursing degree and how you can use community college to help get you there.

What Are the Most Popular Degrees in Nursing?

The nursing field applies to many of those who have a desire to help people and to work in a challenging field without having to deal with the monetary or time commitment of medical school. Before you enter the field of nursing, however, you should know what the different degree options are and what you can do with each of them.

Here is a quick list of the most common types of nursing degrees:

  • Licensed Practical
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10 Essential Money Management Tips for Community College Students
The cost of obtaining a college degree is high, especially at private universities. Students can save a great deal by choosing community college, but there are still other costs to consider. Read on to learn what costs to expect in community college and to learn some essential money management tips.

It’s common knowledge that community college is more affordable than tuition at a private university, but that may not be universally true. The average cost of tuition at community college is $3,660 per year, a cost that is twice as high as it was 30 years ago. Even if community college is less costly than a traditional four-year college, it isn’t cheap and there are other costs to consider.

In this article, we’ll determine whether community college is really the most affordable option and what costs other than tuition students should plan for. You’ll also receive some helpful tips for managing your money while attending community college.

The True Cost of a College Degree

Over the past few decades, a college degree has changed from a luxury that only the privileged were able to obtain into a necessity if you want to obtain anything more than a minimum wage-paying job. A strong work ethic is no longer enough to land a job or to keep it and many fields have begun to require an associate’s or bachelor’s degree for even entry-level positions.

Statistics show that college graduates earn 66% more than those with only a high school diploma and, over the course of a lifetime, earn about $1 billion more. It is important to consider, however, at what cost this benefit comes. A college degree has never been more necessary if you want to succeed in the workforce, but it has also never been more expensive.

Since 1992, the average amount a

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The Top Issues Students Have with Community Colleges and How to Resolve Them
You’ve heard the saying that a chain is only as strong as its weakest link. Unfortunately, many community college students find that their academic chain in school is full of weak links. Read on to learn the challenges that keep community college students from achieving success and what schools and students can do to resolve those issues.

Community college is often described as a low-cost alternative to traditional 4-year universities. Students have the opportunity to complete general education requirements or prerequisites at a lower cost, then transfer to the university or college of their choice. Many students also choose to stay and complete their degree at community college.

Graduation is the ultimate goal of pursuing higher education after high school. Whether you attend community college or a traditional university or college, the end goal is to obtain your degree. Unfortunately, that’s not always what happens. Many community college students never end up transferring to another school and a significant number never finish their degrees at all.

In this article, we’ll explore some of the most common issues community college students have with their schools. We’ll talk about the issues that keep students from graduating and review some of the ways community colleges can improve. You’ll also receive some advice for choosing the right school for you to ensure that you graduate on time.

What Keeps Community College Students from Graduating?

College is not supposed to be easy, but a newly released survey reveals that there are challenges outside of difficult classwork that prevent students from graduating. Researchers at North Carolina State University created the Revealing Institutional Strengths and Challenges survey which was completed by nearly 6,000 two-year college students from 10 different community colleges around the country.

Here are the top 10 challenges students cite for delaying graduation or dropping out:

  1. Work
  2. Paying expenses
  3. Family and friends
  4. Online classes
  5. Parking on campus
  6. Developmental courses
  7. Faculty
  8. Health and
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Community Colleges Are Changing Strategies to Increase Enrollment
Community college enrollment is in decline, but some schools are refusing to roll over. Read on to learn the factors impacting enrollment rates and what some schools are doing to stay afloat.

Though some still think that community colleges are somehow less legitimate than traditional colleges and universities, the fact remains that community colleges provide opportunities for students that might not otherwise find the right fit. With reduced tuition costs and flexible class schedules, community college is ideally suited to non-traditional students including single parents, slightly older adults, and students for whom English is a second language.

Though community colleges fill an important niche in the American hierarchy of education, statistics show that enrollment numbers are falling at an alarming rate. Between 2016 and 2017 alone, enrollment dropped by nearly 2% nationwide. Furthermore, a survey of college and university admissions directors completed by Inside Higher Ed revealed that 84% of community colleges have seen enrollment declines over the past two years.

With declining enrollments and new political challenges to face, community colleges are being forced to adapt. Read on to learn how community colleges are changing strategies to boost enrollment.

Why Is Enrollment in Decline?

In 2018, the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center performed a survey to evaluate recent declines in community college enrollments. The survey revealed a decline of 1.8% or 275,000 students compared to the previous spring. This marks the seventh straight year where community college enrollment declined in the United States.

According to the survey, enrollment was down in 34 states. Six out of the ten largest states on that list were located in the Northeast or Midwestern United States. After taking an in-depth look at these declining student

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Living with roommates is part of an authentic college experience, but is it an option for community college students? Read on to learn about housing options in community college and to learn how to survive the year with roommates.
Some people seem to graduate high school but never really leave the academic world behind. No matter what career you pursue, there are plenty of opportunities for higher education, but are they worth it. Read on to learn about graduate degrees in nursing and whether they are worth the time, cost, and effort.