Continuing Education

Community colleges are filled with continuing education opportunities. Whether you are looking for a resume booster, new skills to earn a promotion or want to earn your degree while incarcerated, community college may be a good choice for you.

View the most popular articles in Continuing Education:

Classes Behind Bars: Community College Takes Courses to Local Inmates

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Classes Behind Bars: Community College Takes Courses to Local Inmates
We’ll look at a new program offered by Jackson Community College, as well as other programs around the country, that allow prison inmates to take community college courses to prepare for life after incarceration.

Community college has offered opportunities to many students throughout their history. In recent years, those opportunities have been extended to incarcerated populations, offering inmates the skills and training to find productive lives after prison. By bringing education to those currently in the prison system, the hope is that once they leave the system, they will never return. Does higher education in prison work as intended? Read on about the efforts by some colleges to transform incarcerated individuals for the better.

This video outlines how education for inmates produces beneficial results.

New College Program in Mississippi Aimed at Correctional Facility

A handful of inmates at the G. Robert Cotton Correctional Facility in Jackson, Michigan, are getting a new lease on life. Fifteen prisoners at this institution are enrolled in a pilot program featuring college courses from Jackson Community College. The inmates are enrolled in four rounds of studies from the school, according to a report at mLive. Classes include a computer course, available through a grant from the U.S. Department of Commerce.

The inmates themselves pay for the rest of the classes. Some are using money they saved before incarceration, while others are relying on friends and family to foot the bill until they are released and able to begin earning their living. Most prisoners are ineligible for financial aid from the government, and even those who have some eligibility have

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10 Great Community College Degree Programs for Introverts

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10 Great Community College Degree Programs for Introverts
We’ll explore various degree programs for shy individuals who prefer to work independently, rather than in a team environment.

Plenty of degree programs offer a better fit for those who aren’t cut out for office politics and team-building activities. Introverts will find a wealth of options at their local community college that prepares them for jobs where they can fly solo much of the time. Whether your passion is art or analytics, check out these community college options to launch a career that fits you to a “T.”

Accountant

If crunching numbers is your forte, the job of an accountant may be a good option. This career, which can be launched with an associate degree, provides many opportunities, from balancing the books for small businesses to huge corporations. These professionals keep company ledgers up to date, pay bills, and file taxes annually. It is a job that requires inordinate attention to detail – and plenty of solo office time. According to AOL Jobs, the average annual salary for an accountant is $61,690.

Paralegal

Fascinated by the legal profession? Introverts who love dabbling in law but cringe at the idea of representing a client in a courtroom might enjoy the paralegal role. These professionals often enter the industry with a two-year degree that prepares them to analyze legal documents, conduct research for a specific client, and write briefs. The job can also be a way to get a foot in the door to other interesting positions within the legal profession. AOL cites the average annual salary for a paralegal as $62,853.

Technical

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Retraining at Community Colleges: A Status Update

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Retraining at Community Colleges: A Status Update
President Obama has called on community colleges to retrain America, but how well have the campuses answered the call? We looked across the country for a retraining status update - and the answers are surprising.

Two years ago, with a morbidly slumping economy and unemployment rates rising to the highest levels in decades, President Obama turned to community colleges as a means of bringing our country back to a state of robust economic health. According to a Washington Post report, Obama told the country that being unemployed is "no longer just a time to look for a new job." Instead, it's time to "prepare yourself for a better job."

To make it easier for displaced workers to get the training they needed to find employment once again, President Obama developed a plan that would allow unemployed workers to continue to receive unemployment benefits, as well as Pell Grants, to head back to school for retraining. Obama said, "I have asked every American to commit to at least one year of higher education. Every American will need more than a high school education."

Community Colleges Put it in Gear

To achieve Obama's end, community colleges across the country started kicking it into high gear, networking with employers in their area to provide job-specific training that would get the people in their communities back to work once again. However, it wasn't long before the economic crunch took its toll on higher education as well, and community colleges were forced to tighten their belts along with the rest of the country. With many budget cuts to grapple with, class sizes grew bigger and waitlists got longer.

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Should an Islam Class be Taught by an Islamophobe?

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Should an Islam Class be Taught by an Islamophobe?
A proposed Islam course at Lane Community College is gaining national controversy as the suppossed anti-Islamic background of the instructor is revealed. Learn more about the sparking debate and the future of the course.

It all started when Lane Community College in Oregon decided to offer a non-credit course titled, "What is Islam?" The instructor of the course, Barry Sommer, had submitted an application to teach a class in Islam for the community college, which the college accepted. However, before the course had a single sign-up, the college put the brakes on the offering. Apparently, officials of the school learned some potentially disturbing facts about Sommer and decided it was best to nip the brewing controversy in the bud.

The Facts

Eugene resident Barry Sommer submitted an application in October of this year to teach a class on Islam at Lane Community College. The school typically offers non-credit courses for interested students throughout the year, and many of these are taught by qualified residents of the community, rather than college professors. According to a report at World Net Daily, approval for the course came, and Sommer began preparations for teaching. When the course went online on the college website, Sommer also sent out a press release to alert others to his offering.

Once the details were announced, a local news station asked to interview Sommer. As the course became more public, so did Sommer's background. It turns out the Sommer may have been involved in organizations that were perceived as anti-Islamic. Once the news spread that Sommer was a potentially controversial figure in the Islamic community, Lane pulled the plug on the course.

This short video

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Continuing Education Opportunities at Community Colleges

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Continuing Education Opportunities at Community Colleges
Learn about the variety of options for continuing education in community colleges.

With over 2.5 million adult students enrolled across the country, according to Eric Digest, nearly one-third of all community college students are over the age of thirty. The variety of options for continuing education in community colleges gives students of any age great opportunities for both technical and personal interest growth.

Adults Seeking Continuing Education Paths

For adults or people curious about special topics, community colleges and continuing education courses allow the open study of various subject matters. As Edgecombe Community College, located in North Carolina, explains, “Continuing Education promotes the lifelong learning process by offering a wide range of programs and services.” The continuing education opportunities are meant to support all adults, regardless of their educational background. Most continuing education and special interest students are individuals who are taking classes for non-traditional reasons: According to Howell, “adult students come to community colleges with a variant set of characteristics. They are more likely to attend part-time, to take courses for self-improvement initially rather than for degree completion, and to enroll intermittently.” Because most continuing education students are already employed in careers or work full time in or outside the home, colleges report that continuing education students bring practical goals and valuable life perspectives to the classroom.

This video offers a rationale for pursuing continuing education.

What Does Continuing Education Offer?

For many adults, continuing education classes are opportunities to explore hobbies

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