Certifications

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The Benefits of Professional Certification from Your Local Community College
Forget the degree! Many community college students are landing good jobs with just a community college professional certificate.

While many college students today are opting for a two-year degree over four years in school, there is an even shorter option to consider. Community college students are finding that certificate programs can be completed in much less time, yet reap the same employment benefits as a full degree program. Check out these benefits of professional certification from your local community college.

Consider the Statistics

While many are still out of work in the United States, millions of jobs remain unfilled. Why? There are no skilled workers to fill the slots, according to a report at CNN Money. Employers need workers who can come right into a position with the necessary training and experience. However, much of that training is not available through four-year universities. Instead, students must turn to schools that are providing the specific training employers in the community require. This is the important void that community colleges are learning to fill – and often through certification and licensing programs.

This video compares a professional certificate vs. a master's degree.

Fast Turnaround

Community college degree programs typically take around two years to complete, but certification programs can take significantly less time. AOL Jobs estimates that most certificate programs range in length from six months to one year. In addition, coursework for these types of programs is often offered in the evenings or on weekends for students

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Get Your Feet Wet with a WaterBotics Camp at Your Local Community College

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Get Your Feet Wet with a WaterBotics Camp at Your Local Community College
This summer, community colleges across the country have been participating in an innovative program known as “Waterbotics,” developed at the Stevens Institute of Technology by the Center for Innovation in Engineering and Science Education.

In an effort to turn more kids onto STEM learning, the Stevens Institute of Technology has brought a new summer program to community colleges across the country. WaterBotics allows middle and high school students to get their feet wet in the area of underwater technology while attracting demographics that might not otherwise consider an engineering career after graduation. This program has been gaining steam over the past few years, and this summer, several community colleges have hosted WaterBotics programs for students in their areas.

What is STEM?

STEM stands for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics – the key components some believe are key to this country’s future in the global marketplace. The Obama Administration has put out the challenge for schools across the country to bring more students into STEM studies to better prepare the future workforce for the challenges that lie ahead.

Dr. George Korfiatis, Stevens Provost and University Vice President, said in a press release on PR.com, “We are living in an age when knowing how to create new knowledge and what to do with it can create a healthier, safer, and more prosperous planet. Scientists, engineers, and technologists are providing the fuel to power the enterprises of this and future generations.”

This video explains STEM.

What is WaterBotics?

According to information on the Sinclair Community College website, WaterBotics is a program designed to educate students in science concepts

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Crack into Cyber-Security Training at Community Colleges

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Crack into Cyber-Security Training at Community Colleges
A career fighting cyber-terror and crimes can begin right at community college. Learn about the demand for cyber-security professionals and how you can obtain training at community colleges.

As we have come to rely more and more on computer systems for our daily lives, the issue of security has become a more widespread problem. From the original fear over a "Y2K" bug that could wipe out entire financial records when the calendar changed to the rising concern over a variety of terror threats, our country is on the search for highly trained cyber-experts that protect our precious computers from whatever ills might befall. The result is a growing demand for cyber-security training – a challenge that many community colleges across the country have been more than happy to accept.

The Role of Community Colleges

According to a blog on Bank Info Security last year, community colleges are beginning to offer cyber-security training in hopes of tapping into funds President Obama has released to spend on strengthening IT security. While this blog has voiced concern over the quality of training some students may receive, other reports are attesting to the fact that community college education in this area can be high quality, affordable and practical.

This video reports on community colleges teaching cybersecurity.

Finding the Best Schools

To help students find the best schools for their needs, the National Security Agency has designated a few institutions as National Centers for Academic Excellence, according to a report in the Baltimore Business Journal. When an institution boasts this label, students can

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Alternative Automobiles: New Training Programs at Community College

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Alternative Automobiles: New Training Programs at Community College
Learn about the demand for technicians of alternative fuel automobiles and its future career potential. Start your career as an alternative fuel vehicle technician at your local community college.

The past decade has seen an explosion of hybrid cars powered by alternative fuels, rather than traditional gasoline. What once seemed a science fiction dream – powering cars with energy other than petroleum – is quickly becoming a reality. However, alternative fuels don’t stop with hybrid engines; experts are working on creating vehicles that can be powered by compressed natural gas, biodiesel, ethanol, and propane.

As the landscape of the American auto industry shifts to include more alternative fuel vehicles, there is an emerging market for auto technicians who are trained to service and repair these next-generation cars. For those looking for a career in the auto industry with definite growth potential, a new training program for alternative fuel technicians available at community colleges could be an excellent investment.

This video offers a brief overview of the alternative fuels training at the Santa Fe Community Colleges.

Alternative Fuels Training Centers

West Virginia University started the National Alternative Fuels Training Consortium (NAFTC) in 1992 to address the lack of technicians who were trained to work with the then-new Alternative Fuel Vehicles. In 1995, the NAFTC added six technical training centers to the existing West Virginia University center. Since then, the program has grown to include 42 members: 41 national training centers and 1 associate training center.

The training centers are located in community colleges and other institutes of higher education from California to Maine.

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A Dazzling Degree: How to Pursue Jewelry Design at Your Local Community College

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A Dazzling Degree: How to Pursue Jewelry Design at Your Local Community College
Learn about the dazzling jewelry programs and certificates that are available at your local community college campus.

For those who are artistically inclined, creative, and motivated, there are rewarding career options in the field of jewelry design. According to reports, a jewelry designer earns an average income of just under $29,000 in the first year of work! After just five years of work, a jewelry designer can begin to earn an average of approximately $54,000 per year—and potentially more. To begin an exciting and imaginative pathway in the field of jewelry design, students can start with programs at their local community college.

Jewelry Design Programs and Opportunities

Although many believe that the art of jewelry design simply involves aesthetic skills and training, this career actually incorporates technical understanding. For example, as inexperienced designers begin to craft their first pieces of jewelry, some of the pieces may be too heavy, may feel cumbersome to the wearer, or may not be made of a sustainable and durable material. Furthermore, some jewelry designers have learned to specialize in the creation of allergy-free jewelry, which is created with specific non-irritating materials.

Due to the industry’s technical demands, designers are often more successful when they have a trained background. With the rising interest in jewelry design careers, community colleges across the country are now offering both degree programs and individual courses to provide students with the essential skills to become successful in this field.

North Seattle Community College

Offering a Certificate in Jewelry Design, North Seattle Community College (NSCC) in Washington enjoys reputable

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