Technology Careers

Indeed, technology careers, ranging from cyber-security to nano-technology, can all start from community college training. Get your feet wet with waterbotics, crack into cyber-security or dive into marine biology at your local community college.

View the most popular articles in Technology Careers:

Microcredentials: Tailoring Learning Journeys in Robotics

Updated
|
Microcredentials: Tailoring Learning Journeys in Robotics
Micro-credentials offer a unique opportunity for adult learners to tailor their learning journeys to their specific needs and career aspirations. In this article we explore micro-credentials in robotics.

Did you know you don't have to have a four-year or two-year degree to qualify for a lucrative job? What you do need is a micro-credential. Micro-credentials offer a unique opportunity for adult learners to tailor their learning journeys to their specific needs and career aspirations. This personalized approach to skill development empowers individuals to acquire targeted knowledge and expertise efficiently.

I know this is true because I took courses decades after graduating from McGill University with a Bachelor of Arts degree and earned several Microsoft and Cisco micro-credentials. Did it require effort? Yes! Was it worth it? Yes!

So, let's dig deeper into how micro-credentials enable learners to create customized paths to success.

What are micro-credentials?

By their very nature, micro-credentials focus on specific skills or knowledge areas. They allow learners to choose from various offerings that align with their career goals and interests. This flexibility enables individuals to target areas where they seek to enhance their expertise, whether in data analysis, project management, or digital marketing.

Research conducted by the Stanford Graduate School of Education emphasizes the importance of learner agency in the educational process. Micro-credentials provide learners with the agency to select courses or programs that resonate with their passions and professional goals. This ensures their learning experiences are highly relevant and motivating, leading to greater engagement and success. Once again, I can attest to that because personal computers were only a gleam in the inventors' eyes when I attended university. If

. . .read more

Careers: Corrosion Technology

Updated
|
Careers: Corrosion Technology
Train for a career in corrosion technology, a science-based job. Many community colleges offer programs. This varied field is a lucrative opportunity for qualified graduates.

Metal is a material that has been used for the construction of many of our buildings and much of our infrastructure today. As this substance corrodes over time, it creates serious safety, environmental and financial concerns across the globe. The industry of corrosion technology is a relatively new field committed to preserving construction projects of all kinds with corrosion prevention and repair. Now community colleges are coming onboard this exciting new field to train up a new generation of workers committed to preserving the hard work of generations past.

Seward County Community College

What is a Corrosion Technician?

According to the Kilgore College website, corrosion technicians work in both indoor and outdoor settings, installing, maintaining and inspecting properties of all kinds. Structures of concern for corrosion technicians might include massive underground pipelines, industrial equipment and storage tanks. The technician might also work in transportation, maintaining airplanes, boats and other vessels.

The corrosion technician must have a background in chemistry, metallurgy and electricity. These professionals may specialize in a particular area of corrosion technology, such as coating inspection or material selection, but others may work in a more generalized setting. According to a report at Pay Scale, the average salary for corrosion engineers ranges from just under $40,000 annually to more than $100,000, depending on the level of skill, training and experience. The field is a growing one, with an increasing demand for corrosion technicians as current infrastructure ages, and few workers trained and ready

. . .read more

Careers: Marine Biologist

Updated
|
Careers: Marine Biologist
Combine underwater adventures with scientific discoveries and crystal blue waters, and you may have a dream career as a marine biologist. Learn about how you can start your marine biology training right at community college!

If you love the ocean and are fascinated with the creatures that live within its depths, a career in marine biology might be the right choice for you. While this career has traditionally required a minimum of a four-year degree to get your foot in the door, many community colleges are now offering marine biology programs - in addition to aquarium science ones - that allow students to land jobs as research assistants and other entry-level positions in much less time. This article will cover what the career of a marine biologist looks like and highlight some of the community college programs now available in this field of study.

What is Marine Biology?

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, marine biologists commit their careers to studying saltwater organisms, focusing on the molecular biology of the living cells in creatures living within saltwater bodies around the world. Marine biologists may also be referred to as oceanographers, scientists who study the physical characteristics of the ocean, as well as the ocean floor. The work of a marine biologist is typically done in the field or a laboratory rather than in an office setting.

Marine biologists usually have a minimum of a four-year degree in the biological sciences, and many pursue post-graduate work as well. However, thanks to the addition of marine biology programs at community colleges, students can now find entry-level work in marine biology in a much shorter period of time, gaining on-the-job

. . .read more

Careers: Robotics

Updated
|
Careers: Robotics
Community colleges are paving the way for exciting careers in robotics. Learn more about the programs that could train you to be a robotics professional.

Robotics is an exciting, dynamic field that utilizes robots in a variety of industries. Robots are used in manufacturing, transportation, warehouses, safety research, mass production, and even surgery. This field offers a wide range of employment opportunities to those who are qualified. How do you earn those qualifications? Your community college has programs in robotics to train you for a lucrative career in the industry.

Robotics is the design, repair, and maintenance of robots. A robotics engineer learns a blend of mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, and computer science principles to develop autonomous machines that perform a wide range of dull, dangerous, and complex tasks. Source: New England Institute of Technology

This video outlines careers in robotics.

About a Robotics Career

Best Accredited Colleges lists two common professions within the robotics industry:

  • Robotics Technicians – These professionals typically require a two-year degree and are trained on the job in apprenticeship programs, as well as through classroom study.
  • Robotics Engineers – These individuals earn a four-year degree, then usually go on to earn a graduate degree or professional certification in their field.

Both of these professions have a wide range of options within their chosen industry, including medical robots, air traffic management, and medical care. Industries in search of professionals with training in robotics include the auto industry, agriculture, and health care. Manufacturing is another area that uses robotics in

. . .read more

Careers: Nuclear Technician

Updated
|
Careers: Nuclear Technician
Learn about the various roles nuclear technicians play, from reactor operation and maintenance to radiation protection and safety procedures. Join us as we explore how community college nuclear technician training programs are shaping the future of energy and offering unparalleled opportunities for those seeking a path into this dynamic field.

As our country continues to search for alternative energy sources, the field of nuclear technology becomes a larger piece of the pie. The knowledge, land, and resources are in place to open nuclear plants across the country – but there is one element lacking. Skilled technicians will be needed to work in these new plants, particularly in light of the fact that thousands of current nuclear technicians are slated for retirement over the next five years, according to a recent report in the New York Times.

As many as 40 community colleges across the nation have heeded the call and are now providing programs to train a new generation of nuclear technicians. These programs can be completed in a fraction of the time of a standard four-year degree, with most associate's degrees earned in two years or less. Both high school graduates and adults looking for a career change can capitalize on these programs, moving into an industry that pays well and is much more secure in terms of growth and stability.

What is a Nuclear Technician?

Education-Portal describes the role of a nuclear technician as one who operates and maintains equipment in nuclear power plants. As specialists in nuclear energy, they might also assist scientists in the field of research.

Many professionals get their foot in the nuclear door with just a two-year associate's degree, and their first job could earn around $50,000 per year. The New York Times estimates that

. . .read more

Recent Articles

New Law Brings Accountability to California Community Colleges
New Law Brings Accountability to California Community Colleges
We explore Senate Bill 1456, which would hold community colleges in the state to a higher standard. How would this translate to benefits for students?
Community Colleges React to President Obamas State of the Union
Community Colleges React to President Obamas State of the Union
President Obama’s call to community colleges in his recent State of the Union Address elicited reactions from community college officials across the country. We’ll report on what some said and how some colleges are already the “community career centers” upon which Obama has called.
A to Z of Community College Certificates and Courses
A to Z of Community College Certificates and Courses
From business and healthcare to technology and skilled trades, the article showcases the breadth of options available to students seeking to enhance their knowledge, develop new skills, or pursue career advancement.

Career Training

Hospitality Careers (1)