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Learn Wine Making, Beer Crafting at Your Local Community College
In addition to the new beer crafting program at a North Carolina Community College, we take a look at other schools around the country that teach the fine arts of beer and wine making.
One of the more popular and less conventional fields of study at community colleges today is a degree in beer crafting or winemaking. While these programs may not seem like paths to lucrative professions on the surface, the truth is that the wine and beer industry is a booming one in the U.S. and beyond. Check out these community colleges that offer training in a long-standing craft that continues to be highly sought today.
 
The Booming Business of Beer Crafting
 
According to a report at Blue Ridge Now, craft beer is a U.S. industry that is growing by leaps and bounds. The article cites numbers from the Brewers Association that show the $26.8 billion industry grew to 27 percent of the $100 billion beer market in 2021. The total number of craft breweries in 2021 is 9,118.
 
“I think it’s a great idea for a school to start this kind of program,” Andy Cubbin, co-owner and head brewer at Southern Appalachian Brewery, told Blue Ridge Now. “I think [the craft beer industry] is growing about 15 or 16 percent a year.”
 
The Community College Times reported earlier this year that providing a degree program in beer crafting gives community colleges another avenue to do what they do best – offer training for employment opportunities right in their own neighborhoods. The article uses Rockingham Community College in North Carolina as an example. When this college decides to add a new program to its catalog, the nearby MillerCoors Brewery, which employs
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Learn the Art of Wine-Making at Your Local Community College
We’ll report on the new wine-making program at Walla Walla Community College in Washington, as well as programs at other community colleges nationwide.
The West Coast is an area filled with fertile land perfect for wineries, which is why the winemaking industry has become big business for western farmers. Many community colleges are acknowledging the success of the wine-making industry by offering degree and certification programs for aspiring winemakers. While one Washington college has been duly noted for its contribution to winemaking in the area, it is not the only school to offer the necessary training for employment in this lucrative industry.
 
Winemaking 101

According to the Huffington Post, Washington has the second-highest number of wineries than any other state in the nation. It also ranks third in overall wine production. With this distinction, it makes sense that one of the biggest winemaking degrees in the country would also be located at a community college in Washington. However, Walla Walla Community College in Walla Walla, Washington, isn’t the only school to capitalize on the need for trained workers in the wine industry. Other schools in the state, as well as in Oregon, have also provided training programs for local wineries.

The art of winemaking is a complex one that begins with planting the grapes and ends with marketing the finished product. Throughout the experience, training is required for grape growing and winemaking, also referred to as enology. Once the wine is ready, workers in the industry must learn wine tasting and marketing products to the hospitality industry. While the work was often passed down through generations of families, the growth of the wine
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Growing a Career in Horticulture
If you have a green thumb and are looking for a growing career, consider the training opportunities available at community colleges.
The field of horticulture opens up a wealth of career opportunities, ranging from education and public service to landscape design and nursery management. Many community colleges have tuned into the value of offering a comprehensive horticulture program to students, providing plenty of educational options.

Grow interested in just a few examples of the many horticulture programs available across the country, as well as the career opportunities you can explore with a two-year degree or certification in this field.
 
This video describes the Horticulture Technology program at Alamance Community College.
 
 
Careers in Horticulture
 
According to the website for the American Society for Horticulture Science, there are many possible career paths to pursue a degree or training in the field of horticulture. Some of the possibilities include:
  • Education – Teach at the community college or university level.
  • Research – Conduct research through universities or companies involved in horticulture.
  • Entrepreneur – Own your own nursery, landscape design company or winery.
  • Parks – Become a part of botanical gardens, learning gardens or public parks and museums.
  • Public Service – Work in non-profit organizations or extension offices.
  • Golf and Sports – Design or manage golf courses, athletic fields or country clubs.
  • Production – Create an inventory for nurseries or landscape companies.
  • Landscape Design – Create beautiful outdoor spaces for commercial and residential properties.
  • Communication – Educate others about horticulture through mass media like radio and print publications.
  • Marketing – Promote nurseries, landscape companies or non-profits involved with horticulture.
The above list is not exhaustive, but it does exemplify just how wide the field of horticulture can be. If working outdoors with plants and landscaping sounds like the perfect career choice for
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How to Go Organic at Community College
Learn about how community colleges across the nation are offering organic gardening classes, as well as opportunities to grow your own organic crops!
While organic foods are healthier than their pesticide-laden counterparts, organic options are typically far more expensive. To help students become healthier – while saving money – a rising number of community colleges are now offering organic gardening classes.
 
The Benefits of Organic Gardening
 
As The Daily Vidette reports, a rising number of consumers are embracing the many benefits of organic foods. Specifically, not only are organic foods grown without harmful chemicals, but these foods also contain up to 40 percent more antioxidants than conventionally grown crops. In addition, organic foods tend to have more nutrients, vitamins, and minerals.   
 
This video describes the benefits of organic gardening.
 
 
Since conventional farming and gardening methods utilize fertilizers and chemicals to boost the yield of food growth, these vegetables and fruits are robbed of many of their natural healthy compounds. By avoiding these potentially less healthy foods, consumers adhering to an organic lifestyle can experience perks such as:
  • Decreased risk of various cancers
  • Decreased toxins in the body
  • Reduced inflammation
  • Decreased signs of body aches/headaches/ general pains
  • Additional health and wellness benefits
Community College Organic Programs
 
Although organic foods are certainly healthier than their conventional options, many individuals are frustrated with the higher cost of these products. Typically, organic foods are priced about 10 to 20 percent more than traditionally farmed produce. 
 
To help ameliorate this burden, community colleges are now offering courses to teach students about the effective processes and methods for maturing healthy organic foods. For example, Central Piedmont Community College (CPCC), located in Charlotte, North Carolina, provides students with a diverse
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