Career Training 101

Everything you need to know about the earnings potential of a community college degree. From fast track training to careers suited for introverts, we’ll cover a variety of career related topics. Learn more about a recession proof careers, casino dealing certification and theology programs at community college.
View the most popular articles in Career Training 101:
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Land One of the Fastest Growing Jobs with a Community College Degree
Are you looking for your career path? Consider some of the jobs boasting the fastest job growth today that only need a community college degree.
Despite laments nationwide over the sluggish economy and high unemployment rates, some fields are literally booming for community college graduates today. With decent starting salaries and higher than average growth predictions, many of these fields are the perfect professions for students of higher education to focus their studies. Many of the fastest growing jobs on the latest list can be entered with an associate degree, giving graduates the best possible value for their education dollar.
 
Home Health Aides
Home health aides come into homes to help those who are disabled, ill or elderly. These professionals provide a wide range of services, from personal hygiene to light housekeeping. In some states, aides are allowed to administer medication or take vital signs as well. The role of the home health aide is imperative to those who want to be at home, but are unable to care for themselves completely. Although most visit patient homes, some work in group homes or care centers as well.
 
According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the average annual salary for a home health aide was $20,560 in 2010. The job opportunities are expected to grow by 69.4 percent between 2010 and 2020, which is well ahead of the national average for job growth. This profession typically does not require postsecondary education, although a two-year degree at a community college may increase employment prospects.
 
Veterinarian Technicians
Those with a passion for four-legged patients may find their niche as a veterinary technician or technologists. These professionals work alongside
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7 Recession Proof Careers You can Enter with a Two-Year Degree
We highlight seven careers that boast a low unemployment rate that you can enter with an associate degree under your belt.
The recession and subsequent high unemployment rate have led many adults in a search for additional education that would lead to a recession-proof career. Fortunately, community colleges are set to deliver such degree programs, in everything from health care to computers. Consider these seven recession-proof careers you can get into with just a two-year degree under your belt.
 

Health Care Administration

Healthcare is a booming industry regardless of what the economy is doing since people still get sick and need physicians and other medical staff. For those who like the stability of health care but don’t necessarily want to work directly with patients, healthcare administration might be just the ticket. This position entails handling the administrative duties in a physician’s office, clinic or hospital, such as maintaining patient files, setting appointments and handling insurance issues. Some administrators oversee an entire small office, while others might be responsible for a single department in a larger facility.
 
According to Yahoo News, the unemployment rate for experienced healthcare administrators between 2009 and 2010 was just 2.9 percent – far below the national unemployment rate of 8.2 percent during the same time frame.
 
Nursing
 
For those who prefer to work with patients, the field of nursing is always looking for graduates to man positions. Nurses work in hospitals or clinics, or they may provide care in patients’ homes. This profession can be entered with a two-year degree, although many employers require additional education to advance in the field. Career Builder also advises
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10 Top Health Fields You Can Enter with an Associate Degree
Learn about 10 of the best jobs in health care that you can land with just a two-year degree from your local community college.
For students looking to enter the workforce with a two-year degree under their belts, the medical field is an excellent one to consider. Many positions within this industry can be started with an associate degree, and the number of job openings and growth potential gives these healthcare jobs some of the best value for your higher education dollar. Check out these top 10 health fields you can enter after spending just two years earning your degree.
 

Dental Hygienist

Most people have a closer relationship with the dental hygienist than the dentist since this is the professional who spends the most time with patients. Hygienists go far beyond simple teeth cleaning, including assisting dentists with some surgical procedures, taking x-rays and educating patients on proper dental care. According to U.S. News and World Report, dental hygienists can expect to make an annual average salary of $68,200 and enjoy a projected job growth in their industry of around 38 percent.

This video explains what a dental hygenist does.

Medical Sonographer
 
Medical sonographers use ultrasound technology to help physicians diagnose a wide range of disorders and illnesses. Sonographers are responsible for taking the ultrasound pictures and determining which photos will be most helpful to the physician making the final diagnosis. This position is heavily patient-oriented, so it is well suited to those who enjoy working with others. Allhealthcare.com predicts that the job growth for medical sonographers should remain around 16 percent through 2016. Professionals in this field enjoy
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President Obama Expands Skills for America's Future Program
In a bid to boost America’s global competitiveness, President Obama has increased the scope of the “Skills for America’s Future” initiative. Learn about how this impacts community colleges and the future earning potential for its students.
The Skills for America's Future program was introduced by the current administration as a way to match up community college training with fields in need of qualified workers. The idea behind the initiative was to make community college graduates more competitive and marketable in the real world after school, as well as to provide industries with highly qualified workers. This month, President Obama has announced that Skills for America's Future will expand further, ensuring more community college students get the training they need to find successful, lucrative jobs once their college training is complete.
 

What is the Skills for America's Future Program?

Last year, President Obama launched an ambitious initiative along with the Aspen Institute, designed to bring companies together with community colleges to produce future workers that would be highly qualified and able to compete in a global market. The movement was dubbed Skills for America's Future, and it began with partnerships between industries and academia that would coordinate the training and build the skills of a qualified workforce in the United States. The initiative, according to the Aspen Institute website, would serve as a broad umbrella under which labor unions, corporations and community colleges could coordinate their efforts to train up a new generation of American workers.

From its inception, Skills for America's Future began signing on a number of key players to help the initiative achieve its goals. Some of the leaders that have worked with the Skills for America's Future program since the beginning include
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Retraining at Community Colleges: A Status Update
President Obama has called on community colleges to retrain America, but how well have the campuses answered the call? We looked across the country for a retraining status update - and the answers are surprising.
Two years ago, with a morbidly slumping economy and unemployment rates rising to the highest levels in decades, President Obama turned to community colleges as a means of bringing our country back to a state of robust economic health. According to a Washington Post report, Obama told the country that being unemployed is "no longer just a time to look for a new job." Instead, it's time to "prepare yourself for a better job."
 
To make it easier for displaced workers to get the training they needed to find employment once again, President Obama developed a plan that would allow unemployed workers to continue to receive unemployment benefits, as well as Pell Grants, to head back to school for retraining. Obama said, "I have asked every American to commit to at least one year of higher education. Every American will need more than a high school education."
 
Community Colleges Put it in Gear
 
To achieve Obama's end, community colleges across the country started kicking it into high gear, networking with employers in their area to provide job-specific training that would get the people in their communities back to work once again. However, it wasn't long before the economic crunch took its toll on higher education as well, and community colleges were forced to tighten their belts along with the rest of the country. With many budget cuts to grapple with, class sizes grew bigger and wait lists got longer. Still, throughout the struggles, community colleges
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Recent Articles
Learn about the growing trend of obtaining your bachelor's degree in community college.
The cost of obtaining a college degree is high, especially at private universities. Students can save a great deal by choosing community college, but there are still other costs to consider. Read on to learn what costs to expect in community college and to learn some essential money management tips.
You’ve heard the saying that a chain is only as strong as its weakest link. Unfortunately, many community college students find that their academic chain in school is full of weak links. Read on to learn the challenges that keep community college students from achieving success and what schools and students can do to resolve those issues.
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Career Training 101