Remedial Education

60% of community college students need remedial courses. This section covers the classes and new developments to help students who need remedial coursework. Learn why the gap exists, how schools are combatting it and what you can do to avoid remedial classes. Get tips on mastering college math, learn what you can do to prevent repeating a class and hear what the experts have to say about remedial class placement.
View the most popular articles in Remedial Education:
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Redefining Remedial Education
Remedial education can be the catalyst for success for students who struggled through high school. Learn about new remedial education programs at community colleges that help students turnaround their educational trajectory.
In the past, students who struggled in high school often didn't even bother with the idea of higher education. After all, if secondary school was difficult, then college would be nearly impossible, right?
 
However, a push for higher college graduation rates by President Obama, as well as truths discovered about many so-called remedial students, has led educators in community colleges across the country to redefine remedial education. As times are changing, more students are turning to special community college programs that are helping them see success in their education and lives after college.
 
In this video, two students discuss how they ended up taking a remedial math class.
 
 
What is Remedial Education?
 
According to WiseGeek.com, remedial education is "education designed to bring students who are lagging behind up to the next level of achievement realized by their peers." Students who found themselves in remedial education often felt they didn't have much chance at academic success beyond high school. Those who did qualify for college entrance often dropped out within their first year because they simply didn't have the background knowledge or study skills to succeed in a college setting.
 
The good news is that these students now have hope for making it through college and earning a degree, thanks to programs that help students develop the skills they need to succeed in higher education.
 
The Need for College Success
 
According to an article at Diverse Issues in Education, the American Association of Community Colleges estimates
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Why Do 60% of Community College Students Need Remedial Coursework?
With a large percentage of community college students needing remedial coursework, educators and policymakers are questioning the causes and solutions to this problem. Gather insight into the issue and how students can better prepare for community college coursework.
In the last decade, community colleges have certainly overcome its wrongful stereotype as “13th grade,” providing invaluable education and training to millions of successful graduates. However, with 20% to 60% of today’s community college students needing remedial coursework, could the stereotype be reinforced once again?    
 
The Problem
 
Shocking numbers of community college students need remedial coursework
 
According to Michigan’s Detroit Free Press, experts estimate that about 20% of students at four-year colleges and universities across the nation need remedial coursework of some kind. But at community colleges, “it has been estimated that 60% of first-time students need at least one remedial course.”
 
This video reports on Black and LatinX students being placed in remedial courses that waste their time/
 
 
Remedial coursework is costly for states and for students
 
The education research and advocacy group Alliance for Education estimated in 2006 that remedial education at community colleges and four-year universities costs taxpayers and students $1.4 billion per year.

Detroit Free Press reports that in the state of Michigan alone, more than $28 million is spent each year on remediation courses at just the community college level.

Students who require remedial coursework more likely to drop out

The Alliance for Education also estimated that the United States economy loses more than $2.3 billion every year due to the higher college dropout rate of students who require remedial reading coursework. An individual who drops out of college has a significantly reduced lifetime expected earning potential.
 
The Cause
 
High school curriculum inadequate preparation
 
An inadequate high school
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Mastering Math: A Guide to Passing Your Community College Math Requirements
Learn about how to prepare for your community college's math placement exams, as well as excel in remedial math courses.
Increasing numbers of students are enrolling in two-year community college programs, yet only one-third of these students will graduate with their degrees. Naturally, there are multifaceted reasons for the high dropout rate, but some reports cite the students’ struggle with math courses as playing a major role, as outlined by WNYC.   
 
Most community colleges require that students take three placement tests prior to registering for classes. The placement tests include a basic math section, a reading comprehension section, and a writing composition section.  
 
Approximately half of prospective community college students struggle with the math placement test, and thus, require at least one remedial math class. Even at community colleges, most degrees require the successful completion of several college-level math classes, and many students consistently struggle to make the grade. Clearly, lowering the community college dropout rate hinges in part on preparing students for math success.
 
This video offers a look at Portland Community College's math literacy program.
 
 
Math Placement Tests: How to Improve Your Score
 
Scoring well on the math placement test can save a lot of time, effort, and money in the long term. In most cases, remedial math classes don’t count towards degree requirements, and thus, making the score on placement tests can save you tuition fees. The best way to prepare for the math placement test is to get the gray matter working again – especially if a lot of time has elapsed since your
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How to Earn Your GED and College Degree Simultaneously
How important is a GED to your future career and earning potential? Also, find out how you can earn both your GED and college degree simultaneously at your local community college.
For many Americans, withdrawing from high school prior to graduation leads to a number of closed doors. Without a high school degree, most Americans have traditionally been unable to pursue higher forms of education, as well as obtain certain jobs. The bottom line is, in order to make a decent living, a high school diploma or equivalency, as well as some college coursework is necessary.
 
Fortunately, community colleges across the country are striving to provide more programs to cater to the needs of non-high school graduates. Upon earning one’s GED, students can enroll in community college to pursue a variety of career and college degree opportunities. In some cases, both a GED and a college degree can be sought simultaneously.
 
The Short Path without College
 
According to the National Center for Education Statistics, individuals who have not earned their high school degree stand to earn far less than individuals who have earned their high school diploma, associate’s degree, bachelor’s degree, or other advanced degrees or trainings. In fact, statistics show that high school graduates make, on average, over $7,000 more per year than workers who did not complete high school. Additionally, workers who have an associate’s degree make about $7,000 more per year than those with a high school diploma. With reduced wages, pay, and benefits, individuals who do not graduate from high school are at a considerable economic and social disadvantage. 
 
Image source: National Center for Education Statistics
 
Furthermore, even when a high school dropout earns his or her GED, the
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Remedial Education