Improving Learning

Get helpful tips and expert advice on boosting your GPA. This section will provide valuable tips on studying, mentor programs and how to avoid academic probation. Examine the latest trends in student motivation techniques, take a good look at online learning, and find resources to guide you on the path to success.

View the most popular articles in Improving Learning:

ChatGPT: A Powerful Tool With Many Uses

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ChatGPT: A Powerful Tool With Many Uses
When your database is the entire Internet, you can answer just about any question lightning-fast. Here are some suggestions for using ChatGTP in your college studies.

Artificial Intelligence has been around for many years. But it's recently gotten much media attention because of an AI application called ChatGPT. ChatGPT is one of several AI apps that OpenAI has developed. Let's explore ChatGPT and find out how it can help you plan your studies at a community college.

To show you how ChatGPT can work as a resource, I submitted the following questions to ChatGTP. ChatGPT's answers are in blockquotes. These questions and answers will show you the power of this remarkable new tool. Note that I use the word "tool" to describe ChatGPT. Its database is the entire Internet through 2021. It is speedy, powerful, and generally accurate. You may be tempted to have it write your papers, answer quizzes, and do other homework tasks. But don't be tempted. Your work and the thinking behind your work are unique. Only submit work that is yours with proper attribution. Claiming that you wrote something somebody else or ChatGPT wrote is cheating. It's unethical and will get you into trouble with your college instructors.

This video offers a crash course on ChatGPT.

I want to take an online course at my local community college. Which is better, online learning or in-person learning?

That really depends on your individual learning style and preferences. Online learning can be great because it allows you to work at your own pace and can

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A Nontraditional Student’s Guide to Community College

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A Nontraditional Student’s Guide to Community College
Going to college is hard work but it’s even more challenging for nontraditional students who are working or raising a family at the same time. If you’re considering community college to improve your life or further your career, here’s everything you need to know.

In the movies, the typical college classroom is full of young, bright-eyed students who have just made the move from high school. They’re excited about being on their own for the first time and ready to take on the world. In reality, every college classroom looks different – especially community college classrooms. Community college students come from all walks of life, including those who went to work right out of high school and those working full-time jobs or raising a family.

Community college is where many nontraditional students go to obtain an education. The flexibility and affordability of community college compared to traditional four-year schools is a major draw, but there are still plenty of challenges to overcome. Read on to learn everything you need to know about succeeding in community college as a nontraditional student.

What is a Nontraditional Student?

When you think of the average college student, you probably picture someone 18 to 22 years old balancing their time between classes, the dorm room, and the student center.

Picture this instead: a 38-year-old single mother who works days at a restaurant, attending classes at night and on her days off. Or a military veteran attending classes online hoping to start a new career after completing his service. The truth is that 38% of undergrads are older than 25. Over 25% are parents, and 58% are working while attending classes.

Students like these are considered “nontraditional,” but what exactly does that mean? Nontraditional students

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Can You Still Get into Community College with Bad Grades?

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Can You Still Get into Community College with Bad Grades?
To a graduating high school senior, grades are everything. But how do colleges view bad grades and can you still get into college without a perfect GPA? Keep reading to find out.

High school is a stressful period for young adults. Between the struggles with changing hormones, social pressures, and academics all rolled into four years, it can be pretty overwhelming.

Some students handle the pressure of high school better than others, and some are better at school for whatever reason. Poor grades are sometimes viewed as an indicator of laziness, but that is not always the case. For many students, poor grades are a small piece of the puzzle. Many students struggle with basic study skills or test taking, while others have difficulty with learning disabilities, distractions at home, or other issues that affect their academic success.

For many students, getting good grades is the only thing that matters. After all, good grades are what gets a student into college—or are they?

College admissions have changed significantly over the years. Today, colleges want to see their students be well-rounded individuals with real-life experience and a direction for their future. Grades are still a key indicator of discipline and academic potential, but they aren’t everything. Even if you have poor grades, you can still get into college.

In this article, we’ll discuss the importance of grades and how much they matter for college applications. We’ll also discuss some strategies for addressing poor grades in college applications to increase your chances of acceptance.

This video outlines the admissions requirements for community college.

Do Grades Matter for Community College?

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How Community Colleges Are Changing Remedial Education

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How Community Colleges Are Changing Remedial Education
Remedial education exists to help struggling students succeed in college-level classes. Unfortunately, the existing model may be doing more harm than good. Keep reading to learn more about the history of remedial education and what community colleges are doing to change it.

Community colleges provide educational opportunities for many students who might not otherwise have access to higher education. First-generation college students, single parents, and other nontraditional students make up a significant percentage of the community college population.

For those who enter community college straight after high school and for those who have already completed some higher-level course work, community college is a less challenging transition than for those who have been out of school for years or who are pursuing higher education for the first time. Many nontraditional students struggle when there is a gap between what they already know when they set foot on campus for the first time and what they are expected to know.

That’s where remedial education comes in. Unfortunately, a review of years of remedial education has revealed that, instead of helping students succeed in their college careers, it acts as a brick wall that prevents them from moving forward. Keep reading to learn more about the history of remedial education and what community colleges are doing to change it.

What is Remedial Education?

Remedial education exists at all levels of education from grade school to post-secondary education. A remedial program is typically designed to close the gap between what a student knows and what they are expected to know, typically in math and reading courses. Simply put, remedial instruction is designed to help struggling students strengthen their basic skills to help them succeed.

In a primary education setting, remedial programs

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How Do Mental Health Issues Affect Community College Students?

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How Do Mental Health Issues Affect Community College Students?
College is a stressful time but, for students with mental illness, there are some additional challenges. Keep reading to learn more about mental health problems in community college students and how to manage them.

Mental illness is still somewhat of a taboo subject, even though it affects millions of Americans of all ages. According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness, about 1 in 5 American adults suffer from some form of mental illness but only 41% of those with mental illness ever seek treatment. The stigma of mental illness makes it difficult for people who struggle with it to reach out for help, especially when they are young and may not be sure what’s going on.

Unfortunately, mental illness is very common in college students and it can impact more than just academic performance – it can affect the quality of life as well. Keep reading to learn more about common mental health issues as well as the challenges they create for students and how to manage them.

Understanding Common Mental Health Issues

There are many different forms of mental illness and they affect people in different ways. Though mental health issues are vast and varied, there are some more common than others. The top mental health issues facing college students include the following:

  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • Eating Disorders
  • Addiction

Depression is not just one of the most common forms of mental illness overall – it also affects as many as 36% of college students on some level. This condition is characterized by low mood, sadness, hopelessness, and changes in sleep, weight, and appetite. Anxiety disorders affect 40 million adults over the

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Recent Articles

New Law Brings Accountability to California Community Colleges
New Law Brings Accountability to California Community Colleges
We explore Senate Bill 1456, which would hold community colleges in the state to a higher standard. How would this translate to benefits for students?
Community Colleges React to President Obamas State of the Union
Community Colleges React to President Obamas State of the Union
President Obama’s call to community colleges in his recent State of the Union Address elicited reactions from community college officials across the country. We’ll report on what some said and how some colleges are already the “community career centers” upon which Obama has called.
A to Z of Community College Certificates and Courses
A to Z of Community College Certificates and Courses
From business and healthcare to technology and skilled trades, the article showcases the breadth of options available to students seeking to enhance their knowledge, develop new skills, or pursue career advancement.

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