Improving Your Job Search

Whether you have just enrolled in community college or you’re ready to graduate and enter the job market, our articles can help improve your opportunities of landing the perfect job. Internships and apprenticeships offer lots of benefits, find out how participation in these programs can move your resume to the top of the pile. Analyze employment data for community college graduates and determine who is getting hired. Get valuable tips on polishing your candidacy and making the most of job fairs.
View the most popular articles in Improving Your Job Search:
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Job-Hunting Tips for Community College Students in a Pandemic
Hunting for a job is always nerve-wracking but even more so in the aftermath of a global pandemic. Read on to learn some job-hunting tactics and tips for remote interviewing.

As of April 2021, the unemployment rate in the United States was 6.1%, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. While numbers have significantly improved over the past year, there were still an estimated 9.8 million people unemployed – this is compared to a 3.5% unemployment rate with 5.7 million unemployed persons in February of 2020. Though the job market is slowly recovering, 2021 college graduates will need to be patient and flexible as they start their job search.

The COVID-10 pandemic caused millions to lose their jobs and many to start working from home. While some companies have started to transition back to in-office work, many processes are still being carried out virtually – including the hiring process. As a community college graduate, you may find your job search looks different than graduates who came before you.

Read on to learn some simple tips for finding a job and how to ace a remote job interview.

10 Simple Job Search Tips for Graduates

Even in a non-pandemic year, graduating from community college and looking for a job can be stressful. Your first job out of school may not be your dream job, but it’s a steppingstone in the path that leads to a successful career. Though things are certainly improving, the economy isn’t what it was a year and a half ago and the job market hasn’t fully recovered.

With millions of jobseekers out there, your job search may be a little longer and more challenging than it normally might be.

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Understanding the Different Types of College Degrees and How to Choose
Choosing a college major can be tough, but you also need to think about choosing the right type of degree. Keep reading to learn about the five different types of college degrees and your earning potential for each one.

The world of higher education is a wide one with many different options. Whether you choose to attend community college or a traditional college or university, there are a number of different degrees to choose from and each one offers unique potential in terms of your future career.   

Before you apply to college, you should consider your field as well as the type of degree you intend to pursue. Not every job requires a college degree, but many do – there are also many careers where you are unlikely to succeed without an advanced degree.

Keep reading to learn about the five different types of college degree, the common career paths for each of those degrees and how to choose the right degree for you.

The Five Types of College Degrees

One of the main benefits of earning a college degree is that it increases your earning potential – college graduates simply earn more than non-degree holders in most fields. Outside of higher income potential, the process of earning your degree opens you up to a whole new world of learning and you develop skills you may not have had before. Having a degree typically means better job security, more career options, and more personal development along the way.

The benefits of having a degree are many, but not all degrees are created equal. Here is an overview of the five different types of college degree:

  1. Associate Degree (ex: Associate of Arts or Associate of Science)
  2. Bachelor’s Degree (ex: Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of
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Tips for Community College Grads to Break the Millenial Stereotype
The millennial generation is assumed to be entitled, lazy, and tech-obsessed. When you graduate from college, you may find yourself working against these stereotypes to land your first job. Keep reading to learn some tips for breaking those millennial stereotypes.

There was a time when obtaining a college degree almost guaranteed you a job after graduation. Unfortunately, that no longer seems to be the case. Hundreds of thousands of college graduates enter the “real world” each year and many of them struggle to find a job in their field, no less a job at all.

Many college graduates find that entry-level positions require work experience – experience which they can’t get if no one will give them a job. Add to that the challenge of being labeled a “millennial,” and finding steady employment after graduation is like finding a diamond in the rough.

So, how do you break through the millennial stereotype to land your first job? Keep reading to learn what the top millennial stereotypes are and how to overcome them to get a job.

This TEDx Talk by Keevin O'Rourke discusses How to Make Millennials Want to Work for You.

What Are the Most Common Stereotypes About Millenials?

First and foremost, it needs to be established exactly what a millennial is. There is some confusion regarding which ages fall into the millennial category, but most researchers agree that millennials are the generation born between 1980 and 1996. People born during this generation have been assigned all kinds of labels including lazy and entitled. The more these labels are used, the more they perpetuate the stereotype – a stereotype that may or may not have any foundation in truth. Here are some of the most common stereotypes

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Getting into Law School with a Community College Degree
You don't have to be a pre-law major to get into law school, but how will your application be impacted by your community college degree?

Community college appeals to people from all walks of life for a number of different reasons. For some, the community college offers a degree of flexibility that can’t be had at some colleges and universities and, for others, it is a way to save money on tuition. But will your graduation from a community college as opposed to a traditional college or university hurt your chances of success in pursuing a career in certain fields? Keep reading to learn some valuable tips for applying to law school with a community college degree.

When Should You Apply to Law School?

Many students who have been successfully admitted into law school agree that applying early is always best. Many law schools accept applications on a rolling basis, releasing their decisions over the course of several months. While applying early will not guarantee your admission, applying closer to the deadline means that there may be fewer spaces left to fill which could hurt your chances of getting in. Keep in mind that most schools will not even begin to review your application until they have received all of the necessary documents to be proactive about making your requests for recommendations and writing your essays. Take the LSAT as soon as you can without compromising your score – if you are fully prepared, take the test at the first available sitting. You should also keep in mind that even if you do not get accepted during the first round of admissions, there may still be

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Do You Need to Pick a Major Before Starting Community College?
Picking a major is a big decision. You shouldn't rush, but there are benefits to making your choice early. Keep reading to receive tips for choosing a major.

When you set foot on a college campus for the first time and start to meet other students, the question you are most likely to be asked first is, “What’s your major?” For some, this question rears its ugly head even earlier, during high school before you even decide where (or if) you are going to college. Choosing a major is a big decision and one that will have a serious impact on the rest of your life. This being the case, it is not something you should take lightly.

But just how important is it to pick a major before you start college? Or can you wait until you have a few classes under your belt to see what you really like? If you are still undecided, it isn’t the end of the world – you can still graduate with the major of your choice and enter the “real world” in your chosen field. Keep reading to learn more about which majors offer the best chances for success and to receive tips for choosing a major that suits your interests.

What Exactly is a Major?

A college major is simply a specialized area of study. When you choose a major, you are choosing the direction of your academic career. In addition to taking any general education requirements your school might have, you will also be taking classes that are relevant to your major. Most community colleges and traditional universities offer a wide variety of different majors, though many schools specialize in

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Improving Your Job Search