Grants & Scholarships

There's nothing better than free money, and these articles can help you get grants and scholarships for your community college education. Acquire information on Pell grants and why you should take advantage of them, learn how you can earn money through community college writing and get the latest news on scholarships and funding.
View the most popular articles in Grants & Scholarships:
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An In-Depth Guide to Financing Options for Community College
Attending college is expensive but there are options for financing beyond just student loans. Keep reading to learn more.

College tuition is not cheap, and the cost seems to rise with each passing year. According to College Board, the average yearly rate for in-state tuition at a public college is over $25,000. At a private college, tuition can cost upwards of $50,000 per year.

If you are determined to go to college but you don’t have an extra $25k to $50k per year to spend, consider community college as an alternative. The average cost for community college tuition is under $5,000 for in-state students and under $10,000 for out of state students. Even if you complete your general education requirements and then transfer to a four-year school, you’ll still be saving a lot of money.

While attending community college is much more affordable than paying for a four-year university, it is still a significant expense. Keep reading to learn about your options for financing community college, including common myths about scholarships, the different grants, and tips for reducing your costs while in school.

This video offers suggestions on how to pay for college.

Debunking Common Myths About College Scholarships

The word “scholarship” is a dangling carrot for high school students preparing for college. While most colleges and universities offer them, they often seem like they are just out of reach. Though you may not realize it, many community colleges offer scholarships as well and there are always private scholarships to consider.

Unfortunately, many students misunderstand certain facts about scholarships, which could prevent them from obtaining one. Here are five

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7 Savvy Scholarship Tips for Community College Students
Are you taking full advantage of scholarships? Use these 7 smart tips when applying for your scholarships, whether need or merit-based awards, as well as those for individuals from certain ethnic, religious, or socioeconomic groups. Increase your chances of being awarded scholarships!
Getting college scholarships is a process that involves much more than filling out applications and writing essays. There are both practical and creative steps that must be taken that can help you win as many scholarships as possible. As a current or future community college student, you’re already one step ahead by choosing a school that is far less expensive than four-year or private school options. With a little work, you can make your community college expenses even less.
 
It’s never too early to start searching for scholarships. As surprising as it may sound, there are many college scholarship programs available for students in their freshman, sophomore, or junior years of high school, as well as for students in elementary and middle school! That being the case, waiting until your senior year to locate and apply for scholarships puts you at risk because you could be missing out on all kinds of scholarship opportunities.
 
It’s also vital to start your scholarship search early because it’s a time-consuming process and one that requires a healthy commitment of time and energy. Each application will have its own unique requirements, and the time it takes to gather transcripts, letters or recommendation, and other required materials can be up to several weeks. And while there are thousands of students who receive scholarships each year, not everyone will get something in return for all their hard work on their application materials. Although it can be discouraging to not receive any award letters in the
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More Scholarship Money Coming to California Community Colleges this Year
Learn about a recent endowment to California community colleges that will provide financial support to thousands of students in need.
Community college students in California who are struggling to make ends meet and pay their tuition bills may get a boost this academic year. The Foundation for California Community Colleges has set up a permanent scholarship fund of nearly $68 million to provide students with the financial aid they need to continue their education. The endowment fund is a culmination of three years of fundraising work that started with a gift from the Bernard Osher Foundation.
 

About the Scholarship

Three years ago, the Bernard Osher Foundation gave the Foundation for California Community Colleges a gift of $25 million to begin a scholarship fund for community college students. According to a press release on the Foundation for California Community Colleges website, the Bernard Osher Foundation was founded in 1977 by Bernard Osher, as a means of supporting higher education and the arts. In addition to the initial gift, the foundation also promised to match funds raised by the colleges themselves.

The L.A. Times reports that California’s 112 community colleges worked together for three years to raise $28.5 million for the scholarship fund. This allowed the Bernard Osher Foundation to contribute an additional $14.2 million to the endowment, which brought the grand total in the scholarship fund to $67.7 million. The scholarship fund is designed to provide financial aid to thousands of California community college students annually.
 
According to a report in the San Francisco Business Times, this fund is the biggest system-wide community college endowment in the
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Should Community Colleges Give Scholarships to Illegal Immigrants?
Amidst major immigration controversy in the country, some community colleges are in the spotlight for giving undocumented immigrants scholarships. Learn more about both sides of the debate.
As the illegal immigration debate continues to rage, another aspect of the issue comes to light. A community college in California has set up a scholarship fund that is available to illegal immigrants, as well as legal residents of the United States, according to a report on Fox News. While the foundation responsible for the scholarship is receiving a considerable amount of flack, it turns out there are other scholarship avenues for illegal immigrants to explore as well.
 
As Fastweb notes: "Federal law passed in 1996 prohibits illegal aliens from receiving in-state tuition rates at public institutions of higher education. Specifically, Section 505 of the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act of 1996 states: "an alien who is not lawfully present in the United States shall not be eligible on the basis of residence within a State (or a political subdivision) for any postsecondary education benefit unless a citizen or national of the United States is eligible for such a benefit (in no less an amount, duration, and scope) without regard to whether the citizen or national is such a resident."

Several states -- California, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Illinois, Kansas, Maryland, Minnesota, Nebraska, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Oregon, Texas, Utah and Washington -- have passed state laws providing in-state tuition benefits to illegal aliens who have attended high school in the state for three or more years."

The Immigration Question
 
Most immigrant students seeking scholarship money hold green cards or have permanent residency in this
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Why You Should Take Advantage of the Pell Grant
Learn about the millions of unclaimed Pell Grant dollars that could help fund your community college education. Find out if you qualify and how you can apply for the free funds.
Are you taking full advantage of your financial aid opportunities?   If you have not yet applied for the Pell Grant, then you may be missing out on millions in federal funding that is currently being unused.  In fact, in California alone, more than 500,000 community college students were eligible for the Pell Grant, but simply did not apply for it, according to the Institute for College Access and Success

As a grant, the Pell Grant does not need to be repaid, making it one of the best financial aid opportunities. In addition, the Obama administration plans to inject another $40 billion into the program, as reported by the Washington Post.
 
College Scholarships explains the Pell Grant as follows:
 
"What we know today as the Pell Grant, began as the Higher Education Act of 1965. Proposed by then President Lyndon Johnson and passed by Congress, the HEA provided financial aid to students from low income families who would otherwise have been unable to afford a college education. In 1972 the HEA was reformed under the oversight of Senator Claiborne Pell. The Higher Education Amendments of 1972 reauthorized the original act, while further alterations and amendments made in 1978 helped to form what we now recognize as the federal Pell Grant program. During the amendments of 1978 the program was renamed to honor the dedication of Senator Claiborne Pell in his pursuit to provide access to
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