Most Selective Community Colleges in Massachusetts

The average community college acceptance rate in Massachusetts is approximately 68% per year (2022).
The most selective college in Massachusetts is currently Laboure College, with an acceptance rate of 21%.
Acceptance Rate Range: 21% 93% Avg. Acceptance Rate: 68%

Most Selective Community Colleges in Massachusetts (2022)

  • College Acceptance Rate Location
  • Rank: #11.
    Laboure College
    Private not-for-profit
    21%
    303 Adams Street
    Milton, MA 02186
    (617) 296-8300
  • Rank: #22.
    Bay State College
    Bay State College Photo
    Private, for profit
    65%
    31 Saint James Avenue
    Boston, MA 02116
    (617) 217-9080
  • Rank: #3-43.-4.
    Dean College
    Private not-for-profit
    69%
    99 Main Street
    Franklin, MA 02038
    (508) 541-1900
  • Rank: #3-43.-4.
    Fisher College
    Private, non-profit
    69%
    118 Beacon Street
    Boston, MA 02116
    (617) 236-8800
  • Rank: #55.
    Becker College
    Public
    70%
    61 Sever St
    Worcester, MA 01609
    (877) 523-2537
  • Rank: #66.
    Bay Path University
    Private not-for-profit
    72%
    588 Longmeadow Street
    Longmeadow, MA 01106
    (413) 565-1000
  • Rank: #77.
    FINE Mortuary College
    Private for-profit
    77%
    150 Kerry Place
    Norwood, MA 02062
    (781) 762-1211
  • Rank: #88.
    Lasell University
    Lasell University Photo
    Private, non-profit
    80%
    1844 Commonwealth Avenue
    Newton, MA 02466
    (617) 243-2000
  • Rank: #99.
    Bard College at Simon's Rock
    Private not-for-profit
    93%
    84 Alford Road
    Great Barrington, MA 01230
    (413) 644-4400
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