Graduation

Graduation rates, policies, and caps - oh my! This section covers all topics related to community college graduations. How does state spending impact graduation rates? Who are the oldest community college graduates? What initiatives are in place to stem the rate of dropouts? Find the answers to these questions and more.
View the most popular articles in Graduation:
Updated   February 22, 2017 |
New Study: 70% of California Community College Students Fail
A shocking 70% of California’s community college students fail to graduate or transfer. Learn about the catalysts of the failure and how campuses are trying to turn these dire statistics around.
Recent statistics have shown that it takes much more than a simple decision to attend community college to succeed in one of these institutions. In California, only 30% of community college students are receiving the benefits a college education can offer.
 
Study Results Concerning
 
A new study conducted by the Institute for Higher Education Leadership & Policy at Cal State Sacramento and reported by the Los Angeles Times found that the large majority of community college students failed to obtain a degree or transfer to a four-year institution. These students typically dropped out – some with a significant amount of debt and no degree to help them. In addition, only 40% of community college students achieved sufficient credit hours in school to boost their potential in the workforce.
 
The study also found a large disparity between minority and Caucasian students, with only 26% of African-American students and 22% of Latino students earning a degree, certification or transfer to a four-year university within six years. This compared to 37% of Caucasian students or 35% of Asian Pacific Islanders who saw success in community college. One possible reason for the difference is that many minority students in the California public school system find themselves in overcrowded classrooms with less access to qualified teachers and counselors.
 
Other States Facing Similar Problems
 
The low community college graduation rates are not restricted to California Schools. According to a report at the Goldwater Institute website, most Arizona community colleges can also be referred to
. . .read more
Updated   February 22, 2017 |
Retaining Students through Innovation
Community colleges are heeding President Obama's call for student retention. Learn about the innovative programs some community campuses are creating that keep students in their classroom seats.
One of the biggest obstacles community colleges face today is the ability to retain students until they graduate or transfer to another institution. According to the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), just one in five public community college students graduate with their certificate or associate’s degree within three years. Students pursuing a two-year degree have a much lower chance of achieving their educational goals than those who begin their academic careers at a four-year university, as the graduation for students at four-year institutions is nearly 60 percent.
However, a college degree is imperative today for individuals who want to gain employment that offers sufficient income to support themselves and their families. Community colleges are an especially good place to get an education because of the convenience and affordability many two-year institutions offer. To help students reach their goals, colleges are getting creative in their methods of student retention.
 
President Obama has set a high bar for colleges across the country: to have the highest college graduation rates in the world by the year 2020. However, this is a very tall task. According to report by 24/7 Wall St., from 2000-2011, the college graduation growth rate in the United States was a paltry 1.4 percent – one of the slowest rates of any developed country. While the U.S. has climbed the list of most educated countries – moving up to fifth place from seventh place – there is still much work to be done.
 
Although the United States ranks high
. . .read more
Updated   August 26, 2016 |
Learn about how you can save thousands in tuition costs by testing out of community college classes.
Are you taking unnecessary classes at your community college? You may be able to skip certain prerequisite courses by simply taking placement tests and earning passing AP test scores. If you can qualify for just 20 hours of course credit through your testing, you stand to save an average of $3,000 in tuition costs. In addition, by testing out of these courses, you not only save money, but can graduate or transfer early and enter into the job market more expeditiously. 
 
How to Test out of College Classes
 
The purpose of placement tests is to determine whether or not a student has mastered the particular subject matter. While testing options will vary at each community college, all students should be able to take placement tests that will earn you course credits. For example, at Warren Community College in Michigan, students can "Accelerate their graduation from college by taking exams including Advanced Placement exams, the College Level Examination Placement tests or the Warren County Community College Institutional Credit by Exam tests." Through these exams, students can earn 30 to 45 hours of course credit - without having to actually sit in class!
 
Students attending Warren Community College can take the College Level Examination Placement (CLEP) or can earn credits through alternative exams:
  • CLEP - You can earn credit for college courses by taking CLEP exams, which are proctored by the College Board. Upon evaluation of the test scores, college officials can evaluate whether or not a student's CLEP performance
. . .read more
View Pages:<<Prev  1 2 3 4  Next>>
Recent Articles
December 01, 2017
Learn about trending community college topics this week such as San Francisco's move toward free tuition at community colleges and the rise in hunger and homelessness among community college students across the country.
December 01, 2017
This summer will be wrapping up before we know of it, and your first semester at community college is rapidly approaching. Are you ready for it?
December 01, 2017
To encourage students to pursue higher education, some states are considering plans to offer zero-tuition programs at public community colleges. These programs could make college a reality for many young people, however, critics argue such programs would cost taxpayers a significant amount of money.
Student Issues / Attending College

Graduation