Courses in College

Be inspired by the gamut of community college courses, from the arts to technical training. This section will cover everything from remedial classes to continuing education. Community colleges offer courses for youth and teens, individuals looking for a new hobby or skill, or those behind bars looking for a second chance.
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College is an important step for nearly any young adult who wants to embark on a rewarding and lucrative profession after graduation. Unfortunately, many of these students drop out of high school before they even earn their diploma, leaving them with few options in employment that can support a family or allow for career advancement. To help some of these students rediscover their academic roots, Gateway to College was created. This innovative program provides the information, resources and support high school dropouts need to get back on track and earn their diplomas and their degrees.

What is Gateway to College?
 
The Gateway to College program began at Portland Community College in 2000 as a means to help high school dropouts bridge the gap in their educational careers. According to the Gateway to College website, the program helps students earn their high school diplomas and community college credits simultaneously, setting them on a path to completing not only high school, but college as well. Since its humble beginnings more than a decade ago, Gateway to College has grown to a nationwide network that includes 30 colleges in 16 states and more than 100 school districts across the country.
 
The Gateway program operates as an organization within a community college campus, teaching students how to succeed in an academic setting where they may have fallen short before. The instructors and specialists that work with Gateway specialize in helping youth who have dropped out of school for a variety of reasons . . . read more

In Iowa, more and more high school students are graduating with a significant number of community college credits under their belts. The reason began nearly two decades ago, when the state passed legislation that requires high schools to pay for the students that take the courses. Money for tuition ultimately comes from the state, with a portion going to the community college tuition and the rest going to the high school. The idea behind the legislation, according to the Green Field Reporter, was to provide additional opportunities to advanced high school students without taxing already tight school budgets.

As a result of the new law, more Iowa students began seizing the opportunity to get a leg up on their post-secondary education. According to the Des Moines Register, more than 38,200 high school students across the state earned community college credits before their high school graduation. Those numbers showed a 50 percent increase over a period of five years, according to the Iowa Department of Education. Students who received this credit ahead of time made up more than one-quarter of all the community college students in the state.
 
The Study Begins
 
This year, as Iowa’s 15 community colleges are gearing up for accreditation through the National Alliance of Concurrent Enrollment Partnership, a study has been launched to determine the quality of college courses taught at the nearby high schools. This study will provide information on just how valuable community course during high schools can be, and what benefits high school . . . read more

Looking for a fun way for your kids to spend their summer vacation? How about a week or two at college? Many community colleges are bringing camps and workshops to their campuses across the country, allowing future college students of all ages the chance to dabble in technology, theatre and a host of sports. The offerings vary in terms of length of time, cost and curriculum, allowing students from a wide range of interests to pursue a new hobby or hone their skills at a current discipline. This article will highlight some of the community college programs available this summer across the country.

Bringing the Arts and Physical Education to New Mexico Kids
 
Clovis Community College has plenty to offer kids on break this summer at their CCC Kid's College. The school provides a range of classes in their summer outreach program, including science, arts and crafts and physical education. Students can create their own volcano while learning about the different rock that is created during an eruption. They can build bird houses to decorate their backyards. They can develop skills in tennis, bowling and volleyball. CCC offers some of the best – and most creative – courses for kids in New Mexico beginning at age five.
 
Kid's College Director Judith Spillane told cnjonline.com, "We wanted to offer both educational and physical educational programs. All of the classes have education and skills components, including our athletic programs."
 
Registration is currently underway at Clovis Community College and will continue . . . read more

Incarcerated individuals are much more likely to return to prison three years after their release if they do not have access to educational opportunities beyond high school, a new study from the Institute of Higher Education Policy has found. In the report titled, "Unlocking Potential: Results of a National Survey of Postsecondary Education in State Prisons," IHEP has determined that providing prisoners with access to college education offers a benefit both to the individual and to society at large. The report was published this month on the IHEP website, and it includes recommendations for policymakers regarding prisoners currently in the system.
 
According to IHEP, there are approximately 2.3 million people in the prison system in the United States today, costing taxpayers about $52 billion each year. Without access to any sort of postsecondary education, seven of 10 formerly incarcerated individuals will return to prison within three years of their initial release. Recidivism costs states every year, which is why it is critical for policymakers to consider instituting programs within the prison system to provide prisoners with the necessary training and education to find jobs after their release.
 
The Profile of a Prisoner
 
The IHEP study found many common characteristics of incarcerated individuals vs. the general population today, including:

  • Incarcerated individuals are much more likely to come from economically disadvantaged backgrounds than the general population
  • Those in prison tend to be from racial and ethnic minorities to a higher degree than the population at large
  • Many in prison today were either working . . . read more

President Obama wants to see more young Americans heading to college after high school, and he has started the wheels turning to make that happen. According to a report at DelawareOnline, Vice President Joe Biden recently announced President Obama's plan to boost community college completion to 50 percent by 2020. The president has also issued additional funding to community colleges to help them meet this goal. Some schools are taking a new approach to boosting enrollment and completion in community colleges – by inspiring students to higher education before they even reach high school. This article will take a look at the way some community colleges across the country are sparking student interest in college earlier than ever before.

Delaware Inspires Middle Schools
 
When President Obama increased national funding for the federal College Access Challenge Grant, it meant more money for the community colleges in Delaware. The schools in the state decided to use some of that extra money to fund a middle school program that brings eighth-grade students onto the community college campus for tours and information. The students learn about the various academic programs available, as well as financial aid options.
 
The purpose of the program is to get students interested in college at a younger age, so they succeed in high school and move to a community college right after graduation. The program primarily targets areas of the state where there are high percentages of potential first-generation college students and single parent . . . read more
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Recent Articles
Community Colleges Prep for the Future by Focusing on STEM
Community Colleges Prep for the Future by Focusing on STEM
As careers in science, technology, engineering, and math become more prevalent, community colleges are shifting their focus to meet demand and secure their place in a rapidly changing educational landscape.
Community Colleges: Bigger Buck Bang than For-Profits
A recent study reveals that job applicants with a credential or associate’s degree from a community college have slightly better chances of getting a job interview than students who attend a for-profit college or university. Since community colleges are much more budget friendly than for-profit institutions and have much better job placement results, community colleges are a much better option for employment-minded students.
Freshman Year in College Looks More and More Like High School
Nearly 52 percent of community college students in the United States begin their freshman year in at least one remedial class. These courses, which help students acquire knowledge and skills they should have acquired in high school, do not count toward their degree requirements. As a result, students are taking longer than ever to obtain their degree, if they obtain one at all.
Courses in College

Remedial Education

60% of community college students need remedial courses. This section covers the classes and new developments to help students who need remedial coursework. Learn why the gap exists, how schools are combatting it and what you can do to avoid remedial classes. Get tips on mastering college math, learn what you can do to prevent repeating a class and hear what the experts have to say about remedial class placement.

Kids and Teens

Community college is not just for adults. Learn about all the programs available to children and teens too. From aiding high school dropouts to ramped up summer school programs, community colleges work hard to encourage the pursuit of higher education to students of all ages.

Online Courses

Online classes give you the flexibility to learn off-campus, often at times most convenient for your schedule. Identify 10 degrees you can earn online, weigh the pros and cons of online education and find out how you can take online classes for free.

Class Schedules

Setting your class schedule with community colleges gives you flexibility and many options.

Support for Businesses

Local business are taking advantage of special training programs at community colleges. From OSHA training to a collaboration with Goldman Sachs, community colleges are training employees for small and large businesses across the country.

Fun & Elective Classes

Community colleges offer a gamut of fun and interesting classes, and we give ideas that may strike inspiration for your elective choices. Learn homesteading skills, study paranormal investigating, or earn a scuba diving certificate all at a community college near you. This sections identifies some of the fun non-credit courses available at your local campus.

Continuing Education

Community colleges are filled with continuing education opportunities. Whether you are looking for a resume booster, new skills to earn a promotion or want to earn your degree while incarcerated, community college may be a good choice for you.