Fun & Elective Classes

Community colleges offer a gamut of fun and interesting classes, and we give ideas that may strike inspiration for your elective choices. Learn homesteading skills, study paranormal investigating, or earn a scuba diving certificate all at a community college near you. This sections identifies some of the fun non-credit courses available at your local campus.
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Community colleges have become the go-to place for professional training of all kinds, but the benefits of these local schools extend far beyond the professional realm. Many adults head to community college to hone a craft, discover a new hobby or simply learn something new. Whether your interests lie in writing, gardening or arts and crafts, a class at community college may be the perfect way to take your interest to the next level. Even if you want to delve into a subject you have never explored before, a community college course may open the door to a whole new field of interest. Check out these non-credit courses offered by community colleges to help adults in the community find new interests, hobbies and activities.

 
Grow Native Plants
 
Carroll Community College in Maryland offers a non-credit course that teaches students to grow native plants to the area right in their own backyards. According to the Eldersburg Patch, the class is taught by a licensed landscape professional and includes the benefits of growing native plants, how to identify plant species and properly care for native vegetation. The course also teaches students how to incorporate native plants into their backyard landscape for an eye-pleasing look both homeowners and neighbors are sure to love. Finally, students will learn how to select plants that will attract natural wildlife right to their property.
 
Whip Up a New Dish
 
Cooking classes abound at community college, whether you are an aspiring chef or simply a parent that . . . read more

Homesteading began in this country with the Homestead Act that was signed into law by President Lincoln in 1862. According to this legislation, people were allowed to obtain free land in exchange for the development of a homestead farm within a set time frame. If they successfully started their farm, the land it sat upon was theirs to keep.

Although homesteading laws are no longer in effect throughout most of Canada and the United States, the idea of homesteading appears to be catching on once again. We will take a look at the new definition of homesteading and visit some community colleges that are teaching students how to successfully adopt this way of life.
 
Today's Homesteading
 
While homesteading in the 19th century was about staking your claim to a piece of land, today's definition is more about finding self sufficiency in a simpler way of life. According to Modern Homesteading Today, modern homesteaders grow their own food, make their own clothing and even supply their own electricity to their homes through solar or wind power. Homesteading allows individuals to abandon the break-neck speed lifestyles common today, in favor of a simpler life living off the land and growing together as a family.
 
Homesteading can be done in any area of the country, including the heart of big cities. In fact, urban homesteading has become a popular concept, as more city dwellers learn to live self sufficiently as much as possible, despite their bustling surroundings.

Other homesteaders find that living on acreage is an . . . read more

Community colleges have always been at the forefront of training students for both traditional and innovative careers...and ghost-busting is no exception!  Indeed, a handful of community colleges are actually offering paranormal studies to train students in the interesting field of ghost-busting.   
 
Be spooked or inspired by the paranormal studies available at the following community colleges. Could researching ghosts be the right career choice for you?
 
 
This Indiana institution is known for many strong fields of study, but recently, the college added paranormal investigation courses to its catalogue. These courses, according to the Kokomo Perspective, are designed to explore the world of paranormal behavior in a way never seen before.
 
The teacher of the course, Al Taylor, is the PR director of Indiana Ghost Trackers. Taylor will lead students on an exploration of paranormal research that will include conduct and safety, as well as the proper use of paranormal equipment.
 
The courses are offered at two different Ivy Tech campuses and are done in collaboration with the Kokomo Region of the Department of Workforce and Economic Development. This organization offers provides career training solutions to help fill the needs of today's employers.
 
 
In North Carolina, Almance Community College is offering its own brand of paranormal training. The school's current class in paranormal investigations has been consistently topping the list as one of the most popular course offerings at Almance.
 
The course is taught by Heather Garner of Grahan, the head of TimeStoppers Paranormal and the . . . read more

Is your voice an instrument? Whether you are interested in singing professionally or for pleasure, your local community college may be the perfect venue for fine tuning your vocal skills.  
  
While many community colleges provide students with music classes, some campuses have added depth to their curriculum by offering classes that specifically focus on the art of singing. Consider adding a singing course as an elective or even declaring singing as your major, which could help you ultimately earn an associate’s degree of applied arts or sciences. 
 
Pursuing a Choral Career in Community College
 
Certain community college campuses are conducive to helping you pursue a lifelong career in singing. For example, Edmunds Community College, located in Lynwood, Washington provides musical opportunities that can prepare you for a career in song. In addition to classes focusing on the foundations of music theory and instrumental performances, the vocally-inclined can further fine tune their singing skills by enrolling in one of three voice courses.
 
The first singing course at ECC is designed to guide students through the intermediate concepts of singing and voice control. Focus areas include, “breath control, tone quality, diction, range, and stage deportment.” Upon completing this first course, students can move to the second voice class, wherein students learn to continually perfect their singing skills through both individualized and group instruction.
 
As students continue to advance their skills, interested individuals can explore various mediums of music and singing, as offered in ECC’s “Soundsation” class. In “Soundsation,” students engage in an advanced and focused study of various elements of . . . read more

Are you interested in a new hobby that will open the mysteries of the sea? Are you hoping to enrich your college experience with a unique and entertaining course? Whether you’re interested in learning to scuba dive for recreational or educational reasons, community colleges across the country are qualified to provide students with the necessary skills, training, and practice to become a certified diver.  These courses are generally open for both registered students, as well as adult community members pursuing continuing education.
 
Indeed, scuba diving courses can be a fun and engaging opportunity to explore new underwater worlds!

How to Get Certified to Scuba Dive

Scuba divers must first obtain a certification card to prove their completion of a reputable training course. The most common certification agencies are PADI, NAUI, YMCA, SSI, as well as other local institutions. Oftentimes, community college campuses provide certification courses through one of these leading agencies. 
 
When enrolling in a scuba training class, the most common certification venue is known as an “open water” scuba class. Once you complete this type of primary scuba course, you will need to pass all the tests and required dives before receiving official certification. Upon earning a certification card, a scuba diver never needs to re-enroll for training, but once this step is completed, you can maintain your certification status for life! 
 
Most scuba courses require that all participants ensure they are in healthy physical shape. Participants should be able to swim at least 200 yards and float or tread water for at least 10 minutes without stopping Adding . . . read more
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FUN & ELECTIVE CLASSES