2015-2020

Updated |
Sports at Community College: Spring 2017 Trends
Community colleges are not generally known for their athletics programs, but some schools do offer opportunities for student-athletes. In fact, it has been a trending topic this week in March 2017.

Many students choose community college over a traditional four-year university because it is the more affordable option. A year of tuition at community college could be as low as $3,500 compared to more than $33,000 for a private university. But just because community college is more affordable doesn’t necessarily mean it is any less a real college. Many community colleges strive to mimic the “true” college experience by offering their students campus housing and social activities.

Another way in which community colleges strive to compete with traditional universities is by offering athletics programs. In early March of 2017, community college athletics was a trending topic on Twitter, Instagram, and other social media. Keep reading to learn more.

Students Choose Community Colleges for Sports

In early March 2017, the Twitter hashtag #communitycollege was filled with announcements made by incoming community college students making commitments based on athletics. Here is an overview of some of those announcements:

  • On March 2, 2017, Twitter handle @jvaught11 posted, “Excited to announce that I have signed to play baseball at Chandler Gilbert Community College.” Home of the Wild Coyotes, Chandler Gilbert Community College is located in Chandler, Arizona and they offer a variety of different sports programs including baseball, basketball, golf, soccer, softball and volleyball.
  • On March 8, 2017, Twitter handle @CoachRegalado posted, “Congrats to @mgonzalez13 on her visit and PWO offer to Laredo Community College!” Laredo Community College, also known as LCC, is located in Laredo, Texas and offers sports programs including baseball, softball, volleyball, tennis,
. . .read more
Updated |
Why Four Year Community College Degrees May Be Great for California
Recently, a measure passed that allows community colleges in California to offer 4 year degrees. Until now such offerings have been the sole province of other institutions. Now, the game has changed.
There’s a change coming in California.
 
Recently, a measure passed that allows community colleges in California to offer 4 year degrees. Until now such offerings have been the sole province of other institutions. Now, the game has changed.
 
On September 28, 2014, California Governor Jerry Brown signed Senate Bill 850 (Block) authorizing up to 15 California community college districts to offer a single Baccalaureate degree on a pilot basis. Ultimately, the goal of the bill is to create one million bachelor’s-degree jobs by 2025.
California Community Colleges Four Year 2
A Better College System
 
Former California State Senator Dean Florez says this measure is a powerful move in the right direction. “Allowing California Community colleges to offer four year skill-based degrees has grown from a long simmering recognition—from students, employers and government leaders—that skills matter more today than how and where they were acquired. This new four-year program offers students a more accessible and shorter education pathway with a recognized skill-based credential.” 
 
“Students benefit with a tailored personalized degree program directed in part by employers, blending their career needs with an affordable degree.  It is also very cost effective, given the planned BA degrees will be under $10,000 dollars, which is nearly one-half the cost of California State's four year schools and one-eighth the cost of a traditional University of California four-year degree.  Most community college students can't afford to give up four or five years of income while accumulating six-figure debt, so this degree program is critically
. . .read more
Updated |
Free Community College Coming Soon? President Obama Hopes So
Earlier this year, President Obama outlined a proposal that would make community college free for millions of community college students. What does it mean for you?
So you want to go to college but can’t afford it. Perhaps you don’t want to take out loans that will take you decades to pay off. Or maybe you don’t think you’d get many (or any) scholarships or grants because your grades are just good enough but not that great, or because you make just enough money to not be considered in great financial need.
 
If the President has his way, none of this will matter.
 
In January in his State of the Union Address, President Obama outlined a $60 billion plan that would make community college free for everyone. And while ‘everyone’ doesn’t actually mean everyone, the plan still would open a lot of doors for students who may not otherwise be able to attend college.
What are the Criteria?
The criteria for tuition-free community college under the Obama plan are fairly straightforward. Students must maintain at least a 2.5 GPA, which works out to a smattering of Bs and Cs – grades that are easily achieved by most students. Attendance must be at least half-time, which is typically considered to be six or more credit hours each semester. That’s just two classes per semester, which again, is easily achievable by most students, even those that work or have other obligations outside of school. In short, students that put in the effort would get a free education.
 
There is, however, a third criterion. Presumably to limit the long-term costs of the program, the plan would be
. . .read more
Updated |
Housing is Down, but California Community College Construction Projects Still Strong
Although California’s real estate may be soft, the state’s community college constructions projects are booming. Learn about where the $1.6 billion is going and how community colleges are improving their facilities.
New construction may be at a standstill for the housing market throughout the West Coast, but that slowdown hasn’t impacted construction enhancements at many community colleges around the state of California. From new student centers to “green” classrooms, the projects at institutions of higher education right now are making up a large percentage of the total construction occuring around the state. And since colleges had already earmarked portions of their budget for the enhancements, many schools are finding they are actually saving money, thanks to the lower cost of supplies and property over the past few years. We’ll take a look at how some California community colleges are gearing up for bigger, better campuses in the not-so-distant future.

50 Projects, $1.6 Billion
 
According to a recent report at Sign on San Diego, more than 50 construction projects are currently underway at community colleges and universities across the state of California. The total projected cost for the combined effort is around $1.6 billion, a huge boon to a slumping construction industry where only a few housing projects are still up and running. In addition to the current projects, there are many more waiting to begin, ensuring the construction industry for the state will continue to find work and revenue for some years to come.
 
Boone Hellmann, University of California, San Diego vice chancellor for facilities, design and construction, told Sign on San Diego, “I think it’s extraordinarily fortunate to have an influx of work in both the community
. . .read more
View Pages:<<Prev  1 2  Next>>
Recent Articles
You've graduated from community college - now what? Keep reading to learn what to do after you've finished college.
Your local community college campus offers a variety of art programs both traditional and modern. Find out more about them here.
With serious mental health issues on the rise on college campuses nationwide, community colleges are scrambling to provide expanded mental health services to students.
Community College News

2015-2020