Extracurricular Activities

Community college can be fun and socially enriching, especially with the right extracurricular activities. Reasons to join the debate club, volunteer opportunities and wellness programs are just a few topics covered here. Explore the benefits of community college outside of the classroom, from holiday celebrations to athletic programs, schools are finding ways to keep students engaged on campus.
View the most popular articles in Extracurricular Activities:
Community colleges provide a plethora of opportunities for traditional and non-traditional students alike. These two-year institutions offer fast, affordable higher education to high school graduates who are not ready for the university and older students looking for a new direction in their career path. One element of community college that is often overlooked is the ability for students to play sports at the junior college level. From football to women’s softball, many campuses across the country provide the chance for students to participate in the sport of their choice for fun, competition and even a possible career.

Benefits of Sports at Community College
 
The addition of a robust athletics program at community colleges offers a host of benefits to students, as well as the school. While these programs are not traditionally big money makers for the colleges, the advantages offered may make the cost of the programs worthwhile to many college campuses.
 
“It provides a full college experience,” Gary Branch, president of Faulkner State Community College, explained to the GadsenTimes. Branch is also the president of the Alabama College Athletic Conference.
 
David Mollahan agrees. The president of Marion Military Institute told the Times, “It’s beneficial to higher education. Our programs, I think, are worth it.”
 
Although some in the community college arena lament the cost of such programs, particularly at a time when budgets are getting tighter and tighter, Raymond Staats, president of Gadsen State Community College told the Times, “It’s not as costly as people think, and . . . read more

Community college can be a challenging prospect for new students, whether they are coming right out of high school or after being in the workforce for a number of years. To make the transition smoother, a number of community colleges across the country have established mentoring programs connecting new students with those who already know the ropes. In the past several academic years, more of these programs have been introduced, thanks to grant money and willing mentor participants. We’ll take a look at why mentoring can be a valuable tool in the community college environment and how some schools are using the concept for the benefit of new students.

What is Mentoring?
 
Mentoring programs work by pairing newcomers with older, more experienced students. Mentors may provide a number of valuable functions, including helping new students with their schedules, providing campus tours and offering information about resources and facilities available on campus. In some cases, mentors might also be faculty members dedicated to helping new students succeed by easing them through the transition between high school or the workforce and a college environment. These programs can be a powerful tool to student success when they are correctly implemented.
 
For students that need special help when they get to community college, a mentor program can truly be a lifesaver. The mentors that work in these organizations may point new students to the resources and additional assistance they need, whether it is academic, financial or of another sort. In addition to . . . read more

The "freshman 15" and "sophomore 10" are phenomenon that seems to plague community college students on every campus. Gaining weight often arrives hand-in-hand with the start of the school year, especially during the first years of college.

To combat issues related to obesity, excess weight, and poor lifestyle habits, community colleges across the country are providing students with weight loss support. Through these programs, perhaps the freshman 15 may become a phenomenon of the yesteryears!
 
Free Community College Weight Loss Programs

To help students enjoy weight loss success, community colleges have implemented unique and diverse programs to cater to individual dieting needs. For example, as Chron News reveals, Alvin Community College (ACC), located in Texas, now provides students with an innovative online weight loss class. Titled "Lose Weight and Keep it Off," the ACC course has been designed in cooperation with the world's largest resource and provider of online classes for adult students, ed2go. Through the expert guidance of Donna Acosta, ACC's registered dietician and nutrition instructor, all participants will learn about weight loss strategies, including:
  • Sensible eating
  • Simple habits of weight loss
  • How to maintain weight loss results and keep the pounds off
Clark State Community College (CSCC), with campuses in Springfield and Beavercreek Ohio, has created an event to stimulate even more weight loss motivation. To help students pursue the path to better health, CSCC leaders encourage students to participate in weight loss contests sponsored and conducted by the college's Health Clinic. With the guidance of Health Clinic . . . read more

Are you willing to go the distance? Marathon enthusiasts can find fantastic races on their very own community college campuses. Through marathon clubs or teams, community college students not only race against their colleagues, but against their professors too!
 
If you're curious about what it takes to become a marathon runner, or if you're hoping to find fellow students to join for long distance running, consider community college marathon groups available in your local area.
 
Benefits of Joining Community College Marathon Teams

Marathon teams are literally springing up at community college campuses across the country. For example, Highland Community College, located in Highland, Kansas, offers a highly competitive Highland Marathon Team for eligible students. In examining the Highland Women's team, runners were able to compete at the National Junior College Athletic Association Half Marathon Championships, where participants raced in a 13.1 mile event.
 
Hosted at a different community college campus each year, the 2008 race was held at Johnson County Community College. Setting a six-year record for the Athletic Association's, 185 runners representing a total of 27 different colleges participated. Individual runners hoped to earn fast times, and each college team strove for a top prize and ranking. According to the Highland Women's Marathon Team records, several of the school's top runners completed the race in under 1 hour and 45 minutes!
 
If you're curious about how to join your community college marathon team, you may need to try out to showcase your speed and skills. Most community colleges . . . read more

Whether you are new to campus or simply looking to broaden your social network, your community college’s sports teams are an excellent way to meet friends and get healthy. 
 
Nearly all community colleges offer students team sports and casual athletic venues to have fun and interact with fellow students.  Regardless of your athleticism, all community college students can equally enjoy leisurely athletic opportunities by joining social teams at local community colleges. 
 
How to Participate in Community College Sports Teams, Clubs, and Groups
While students who have earned athletic scholarships certainly possess a unique set of skills and physical talents, the general student population attending community college generally seeks out sports as a way to relax, meet new friends, and have fun. 
 
Most commonly, community colleges provide students with club or intramural sports.  “Intramural” teams are common offerings at community colleges that provide students with more casual and leisurely interactions.  As “intramural” is derived from the Latin word for “wall” (muris), intramural sports generally allow any interested participants to engage in the “mural” or variety of school offerings.
 
To find out about these social and casual opportunities at local community colleges, students can simply seek out information from their Student Services / Student Activities Centers.  If these specialized offices or services are not available, a student can always meet with their campus advisor to find out more details about potential opportunities.  Oftentimes, community colleges have full time professionals monitoring, organizing, and advertising for these groups and clubs, as intramural and leisurely . . . read more
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EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES