Good Samaritan College of Nursing and Health Science

Tel: (513)862-2631
  • Good Samaritan College of Nursing and Health Science is a private, not-for-profit institution of higher education and it serves the tri-state region of Southwestern Ohio, Northern Kentucky, and Southeastern Indiana. The College is a subsidiary of TriHealth, Inc. and Good Samaritan Hospital. Good Samaritan Hospital has sponsored a nursing program since 1896, beginning with the Good Samaritan Hospital School of Nursing. The College provides quality nursing education in a Catholic environment. The College awards the Associate of Applied Science in Nursing degree to qualified graduates who go on to serve Good Samaritan Hospital, the community of greater Cincinnati, the nation, and the world. The Good Samaritan College of Nursing and Health Science identifies itself as a specialized college of higher education committed to educating men and women for careers in nursing and other health related fields in the greater Cincinnati region. The College is a private Catholic institution that fulfills its mission by addressing the needs of qualified students of differing interests, plans, expectations, and ages.
School Highlights
  • Good Samaritan College of Nursing and Health Science serves 353 students (36% of students are full-time).
  • The college's student:teacher ratio of 11:1 is lower than the state community college average of 28:1.
  • Minority enrollment is 6% of the student body (majority Black), which is more than the state average of 27%.
  • Good Samaritan College of Nursing and Health Science is one of 14 community colleges within Hamilton County, OH.
  • The nearest community college is Cincinnati State Technical and Community College (1.20 miles away).

School Overview

  • The teacher population of 32 teachers has declined by 36% over five years.
Good Samaritan College of Nursing and Health Science (OH) Community College Avg.
Institution Level Four or more years Four or more years
Institution Control Private, non-profit Private, non-profit
Total Faculty 32 staff 30 staff
Good Samaritan College of Nursing and Health Science Total Faculty (2007-2016)

Student Body

  • The student population of 353 has grown by 12% over five years.
  • The student:teacher ratio of 11:1 has increased from 6:1 over five years.
  • The school's diversity score of 0.11 is less than the state average of 0.44. The school's diversity has declined by 45% over five years.
Total Enrollment 353 students 641 students
Good Samaritan College of Nursing and Health Science Total Enrollment (2007-2016)
Student : Teacher Ratio 11:1 28:1
Good Samaritan College of Nursing and Health Science Student Staff Ratio (2007-2016)
# Full-Time Students 128 students 392 students
Good Samaritan College of Nursing and Health Science Full-Time Students (2007-2016)
# Part-Time Students 225 students 249 students
Good Samaritan College of Nursing and Health Science Part-Time Students (2007-2016)
Good Samaritan College of Nursing and Health Science Enrollment Breakdown OH All Enrollment Breakdown
% Asian
-
1%
Good Samaritan College of Nursing and Health Science Asian (2007-2013)
% Hispanic
-
3%
Good Samaritan College of Nursing and Health Science Hispanic (2007-2013)
% Black
5%
12%
Good Samaritan College of Nursing and Health Science Black (2007-2016)
% White
94%
73%
Good Samaritan College of Nursing and Health Science White (2007-2016)
% Two or more races
1%
1%
Good Samaritan College of Nursing and Health Science More (2011-2016)
Good Samaritan College of Nursing and Health Science Ethnicity Breakdown OH All Ethnic Groups Ethnicity Breakdown
Diversity ScoreThe chance that two students selected at random would be members of a different ethnic group. Scored from 0 to 1, a diversity score closer to 1 indicates a more diverse student body. 0.11 0.44
Good Samaritan College of Nursing and Health Science Diversity Score (2007-2016)
College Completion Rate
71%
31%
Good Samaritan College of Nursing and Health Science Completion Rates for First-Time, Full-Time Students (2007-2012)
Average Graduate Earnings (10 Years) $43,800 $31,400
Good Samaritan College of Nursing and Health Science Average and Median Earnings, Disaggregated by Student Subgroups (2008-2013)

Finances and Admission

  • The private state tuition of $19,420 is more than the state average of $14,791. The private state tuition has grown by 13% over four years.
Private State Tuition Fees $19,420 $14,791
Good Samaritan College of Nursing and Health Science In-State Tuition Fees (2007-2015)
% Students Receiving Some Financial Aid 73% 93%
Good Samaritan College of Nursing and Health Science % Students Receiving Some Financial Aid (2007-2016)
Median Debt for Graduates $23,750 $21,960
Good Samaritan College of Nursing and Health Science Median debt for students who have completed (2007-2015)
Median Debt for Dropouts $10,500 $7,090
Good Samaritan College of Nursing and Health Science Median debt for students who have not completed (2007-2015)
Acceptance Rate 79% 78%
Good Samaritan College of Nursing and Health Science Percent Admitted (2007-2016)
SAT Total Avg. 992 935
SAT Reading 502 460
Good Samaritan College of Nursing and Health Science SAT Reading (2007-2016)
SAT Math 490 475
Good Samaritan College of Nursing and Health Science SAT Math (2007-2016)
ACT Total Avg. 62 63
ACT Composite 21 21
Good Samaritan College of Nursing and Health Science ACT Composite (2007-2016)
ACT English 21 21
Good Samaritan College of Nursing and Health Science ACT English (2007-2016)
ACT Math 20 21
Good Samaritan College of Nursing and Health Science ACT Math (2007-2016)
Source: 2016 (or latest year available) IPEDS

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