Transfer Process

Many community college students transfer to four-year institutions. Be prepared to make a swift and easy transfer with these articles. Determine the most transfer-friendly universities, learn why some 4-year schools are limiting transfer students, and get tips on ensuring your credits go with you.
View the most popular articles in Transfer Process:
How Well do Community College Students Perform After Transferring?
After transferring to a four-year institution, how do community college students fare? Learn about the reports and studies that shed light on community college student performance at the university level.
Students enter community college with plans to eventually transfer to a four-year university for a number of reasons. The student may have limited funds and will try to save money by getting lower division courses out of the way at community college, before heading to a university to complete major requirements. Some students may not have a high enough GPA at graduation to move directly into the university of their choice, so they take the first year or two of classes at community college until their GPA is high enough for a successful transfer.

No matter what your reason for transferring from community college, success in your academic endeavors is surely your ultimate goal. This article will explore the success rate of community college students that transfer to a four-year institution, as well as some of the factors that help determine performance after transferring.
 
What is Transfer Shock?
 
One concern for community college students transferring to four-year institutions is something commonly referred to as "transfer shock" in higher education circles. According to a report at the National Academic Advising Association (NACADA) website, transfer shock refers to the dip in grade point average that is experienced during the first or second semester at a new school. Transfer shock is a concern for educators as well as students, and it may impact the number of transfer students a university may be willing to accept in any given year.
 
Transfer shock is a very real phenomenon that affects many transfer students and may . . . read more

Top 10 Most Community College Transfer-Friendly Universities
Which four-year universities embrace the highest numbers of community college transfer students? Read this article to find out!
ASU - Photo Credit: Schwnj via Wikipedia Commons
For many community college students, the end goal is not simply an associate degree from their current school, but the ability to transfer to a university and earn a bachelor's degree. However, many community college students are dismayed to discover that the classes they paid for and worked hard in at their community college don't always make the transfer to the next step. To ensure the hard work completed at the community college level does not go by the wayside, we analyze the latest US News and World Report study that discusses the 10 most transfer-friendly universities around the country.

Transfer Rates
 
According to the US News and World Report study, more than a half-million community college students transferred into four-year colleges in 2009. There are a variety of reasons why students may choose to take this path to completing their education. Some like the more affordable tuition rates at community colleges and get as many of their credits at these less expensive schools as possible before completing their education at a university. Others find that after earning their associate degree, they want to pursue additional training and education in their field.
 
No matter what the reason for completing a transfer, students in this situation may discover that universities vary significantly in the amount of transfer students they accept and the resources provided to transfer students. For those who want to join this number in the future, it pays to research the best universities for transfer students, so they can . . . read more

Enroll in a Community College and Four-Year University Simultaneously
Savvy students are taking advantage of dual enrollment programs that allow them to take courses at community college and a four-year university concurrently. Learn about the benefits and how you can take advantage of these programs.
Students who wish to earn a four-year degree but have limited funds to pay for a university have often been in a quandary over how to pay for their education. Some begin their college careers in less expensive community colleges, in the hopes of transferring to a four-year college once they earn their associate's degree. To expand the options for these students, some community colleges are teaming up with four-year institutions to provide dual-enrollment at both schools at the same time. We'll tell you how this dual enrollment works, what the benefits are and highlight some of the schools already using this model.

What is Dual Enrollment?
 
Students pursuing the dual enrollment option actually enroll in a community college and four-year university simultaneously. The student must be accepted into both schools before the dual enrolment can be complete. In most of these programs, students can take courses from either institution, and tuition rates are based on the college where the course is offered. In addition, students have access to facilities and services at both colleges, expanding their options in additional activities and resources.
 
Benefits of Dual Enrollment
 
There are many potential benefits of the dual enrollment model, including:

  • Simplified admission process that allows students access to both colleges with one application
  • Course planning and advising is coordinated for a more efficient degree track
  • Financial aid is streamlined between the two schools
  • Expanded options for student services, including counseling, libraries and computer labs
  • Transcripts may be sent automatically from one institution to the other . . . read more

Legislation that will Make Transferring to Four-Year Universities Easier
Learn about how California and another states are passing legislation to guarantee transfer requirements between community colleges and state universities.
Many high school students are advised to begin their college career at a community college for cost or academic reasons. However, the transfer process from a two-year college to a four-year university can be confusing at best, with conflicting requirements that may make a degree that much more elusive. The result is that many students never end up graduating at all and some don't even make it into the hallowed ivy walls of a university in the first place.

California Higher Education Bill
 
The state of California is hoping to change all the confusion, thanks to legislation intended to make the transfer process much easier and more streamlined. A report at the Chronicle of Higher Education explains the legislation, which is slated to go into effect during the fall of 2011. The bill was approved in the state senate this month, and it is expected that Governor Schwarzenegger will sign the bill into law.
 
The California bill requires community colleges to offer a redesigned associate's degree. Students who complete the degree would be guaranteed admission into one of California State University campuses, where they could complete a bachelor's degree in 60 credit hours or less. The purpose of the bill is to increase the number of students who successfully transfer from a community college to a four-year university and come out of the process with a degree in hand.
 
Models to Follow
 
The California legislation is modeled after similar program in Florida and Texas, indicating a national movement toward . . . read more

Learn about articulation agreements between community colleges and prestigious business schools, which can help you earn a lucrative business degree.
Earning a bachelor’s business degree can pay off in dividends, with staff accountants generating $40,000 annually to financial controllers earning a median salary of $70,000. If you are a community college student considering a career in business, there’s good news on the horizon! Some of America’s best business programs have partnered with local community colleges, offering transfer students guaranteed admissions into business schools at four-year universities.     

Building Bridges Between Community Colleges and Business Schools
 
Across the country, more community colleges and business schools are signing articulation agreements, guaranteeing admissions for transfer students who meet the requirements. 
 
For example, Carroll Community College (CCC), located in Westminster, Maryland, signed a transfer agreement with Johns Hopkins University’s Carey Business School in November of 2009. The agreement “assures that qualified community college students can enter Johns Hopkins without the loss of credit and work on a four-year degree while entering with junior status.” With this agreement, community college students at Carroll have a specific outline regarding which courses to take and how they will transfer towards a B.S. Business. 
 
In addition, through this agreement, students of Carroll Community College who intend to pursue a degree with the Carey Business School can access joint programs, resources, and advisors. 
 
According to CCC’s dean of Mathematics, Business, and Sciences, Judy Coen, “The new agreement is indicative of a trend among independent and private colleges that community college students are of high caliber and that articulation agreements make good sense.”
 
Articulation from Maryland to Connecticut
 
In March of 2010, the University of . . . read more
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Choosing a School

TRANSFER PROCESS