Transfer Process

Many community college students transfer to four-year institutions. Be prepared to make a swift and easy transfer with these articles. Determine the most transfer-friendly universities, learn why some 4-year schools are limiting transfer students, and get tips on ensuring your credits go with you.
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Start to Finish: Making the Most of Community College Degree Programs
As you plan your community college journey, take advantage of this start to finish guide. Learn about some of the hottest community college degree programs today, the importance of tying the degree into the current industry needs and how to plan your community college degree for preparation into a four-year degree program.
Community college has come a long way since their humble beginnings, and now two-year programs have become an effective way for many to jumpstart a new career or advance their current job to the next level. Whether you are looking for a two-year degree program that gets you into the workforce faster, or you are preparing for a four-year degree program with an eventual transfer to a university, community colleges have what you are looking for. However, before you sign on with the closest community college, check out these tips to help you make the most of your two years spent at that institution.

Choosing a Degree Program
 
The plethora of two-year degree programs is one of the primary reasons more adult students are flocking to community colleges today. These schools offer a bevy of options, from general education degrees to career-specific training in everything from renewable energy to healthcare. However, the growing number of degree choices can also make it difficult for first-year community college students to settle on a program that will offer them both fulfillment and sufficient career openings. It is important to research degree programs carefully before choosing a major to ensure you find the program that will be both personally rewarding and financially lucrative.
 
According to data collected by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics and reported by College Board, the top 10 degrees currently offered by community colleges in terms of job openings include:
 
       ·        Registered nurses
       ·        Nursing aids, orderlies . . . read more

University of Minnesota to Limit Transfer Students
A recent decision by the University of Minnesota will limit the number of transfer students it will accept. How will this decision impact community college students in the area?
Photo Credit: Wikipedia Commons
In what has been called a major setback for Minnesota community college students, the University of Minnesota has formally announced plans to reduce the number of transfer students to the school. While the university claims that the decrease will be just a “drop in the bucket” in regards to total transfer numbers, students and community college officials are voicing their concerns over the policy change. With community college enrollment increasing nationwide, it is possible that other universities will eye the new University of Minnesota policy with interest as they grapple with their own issues regarding a rising number of transfer students.

Pulling Back the Welcome Mat
 
According to a report at TwinCities.com, the welcome mat has a history of being extended to transfer students at the University of Minnesota. In 2009, the school accepted 3,260 new transfer students, which made up nearly 40 percent of their new student population overall. However, the university plans to cut the number of transfer students they accept by roughly eight percent over the next two years – which will translate to around 300 transfer students. The university cites various reasons for their decision, including their desire to form a solid, four-year relationship with more students coming to the school. The school has also stated that fluctuating transfer numbers from year to year put a strain on university resources.
 
Another concern from some university officials is the lack of preparedness seen in some transfer students when they enroll at the four-year school. Need for . . . read more

2+2 Programs Going Strong at Community Colleges Nationwide
Learn about programs offered by community colleges that allow students to earn a two-year degree and then go on to earn a bachelor’s degree either online or at a nearby university.
2+2 programs match up the puzzle pieces of the transfer process.
Students who are serious about earning a four-year degree will find that community college may be a good place for them to begin the process. Thanks to “2+2” programs cropping up across the country, students can now enroll in community college with their eyes set on goals after the associate degree is earned. Through partnerships with nearby universities and online programs, students have a precise educational direction that starts at community college and continues on through the four-year degree program. We’ll take a look at what a 2+2 program offers community college students, as well as examine some of the 2+2 programs going on around the country today.

What is 2+2?
 
According to a report at the Grand Island Independent, a 2+2 program is one that begins in a community college, with a two-year associate degree or certification program. Coursework taken at the community college then transfers to a four-year program, allowing the student to complete a bachelor’s degree in the same amount of time it would have taken if they had gone to the four-year institution right out of high school. Because the program is a partnership between the schools, students enter community college with a four-year end in sight and select courses at the first institution that will help them to achieve their ultimate goals.
 
The community college and four-year school work together to ensure all of the courses they offer complement each other for an overall, comprehensive degree program. Whether the second half of . . . read more

New Community College Transfer Programs Putting Students on Fast Track to Success
More college transfer programs are streamlining the process of transferring from community colleges to four-year universities. Learn about some of the newest programs and how you could possibly benefit.
While some community college students focus on a two-year vocational program to launch their career, others look ahead to additional education to make their desired career path a reality. To make the second path more efficient, many community colleges across the country are teaming up with four-year universities to streamline the transfer process. While this is a pattern that has been gaining steam, new community colleges are joining the ranks this year to offer even more options to community college graduates. We’ll take a look at some of the latest community college transfer programs launching around the country.

The Big Transfer Push in California
 
One of the biggest transfer programs to make headlines this year is in California. Currently, the state has 112 community colleges. Of that number, more than half have developed an associate degree program designed for transfer to CSU schools. According to a report in the Sacramento Business Journal, the goal of the plan is to provide guaranteed associate degrees for transfer at every community college in the state. Chancellor of California Community Colleges, Jack Scott, said that the new program is still in the early stages and that much more is planned. Students that are currently enrolled in participating community colleges, and have taken 60 credit hours in an approved associate degree program, will be able to transfer to a CSU school with a similar major and a junior standing.
 
According to California Community Colleges, the transfer program will save the system $160 million each . . . read more

University Leaders Report: How to Increase Transfers from Community Colleges
Many students start their academic careers at a community college, hoping to transfer to a four-year university, but find themselves missing the mark. Thankfully, a new report surveying university leaders provides ideas on how to help students make the transfer successfully.
While community colleges offer a wealth of options in associate degree programs and practical career training, the majority of students that grace a community college campus for a period of time are not content with a degree from these schools. In fact, the large majority of community college students has plans to further their education by eventually transferring their credits to a four-year institution. This is the precise subject of the latest report by College Board that looked at the high number of community college students that want to transfer to a four-year university and why.

About the Report
 
College Board is a non-profit organization committed to equality in education, from the early primary years all the way through a postsecondary education. This particular report, titled, “Improving Student Transfer from Community Colleges to Four-Year Institutions,” was designed to emphasize the importance of smooth pathways between community colleges and other institutions of higher education. The College Board website estimates that more than 7 million students enrolled in community colleges – up to 41 percent of all college students across the country - at any given time. With so many students enrolled in community colleges, it is important to assess what the choices for these students might be should they decide to continue to pursue their education after their initial degree program is completed.
 
To compile this report, College Board interviewed 21 education leaders at 12 institutions of higher education across the country, according to an article on the New . . . read more
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TRANSFER PROCESS