Montgomery County Community College

340 Dekalb Pike, Blue Bell
PA, 19422-0796
Tel: (215)641-6300
13,645 students
Public institution
Montgomery County Community College is a place where the future is created, a place where desire and knowledge are combined to yield opportunity. The College is a reflection and a response to the needs and aspirations of those who live, work, and conduct business in Montgomery County and beyond. Grounded in a set of values that teach us to encourage, listen, respect, and treat fairly those whom we serve, those with whom we work, and those who work with us in service, the College strives to ensure that all residents of Montgomery County have access to the highest quality and most affordable higher education possible. Most importantly, the College is dedicated to fostering the growth and success of all we serve.
School Highlights:
Montgomery County Community College serves 13,645 students (37% of students are full-time).
Minority enrollment is 18% of the student body (majority Black), which is less than the state average of 25%.
Montgomery County Community College is one of 7 community colleges within Montgomery County, PA.
The nearest community college is Antonelli Institute (6.5 miles away).

School Overview

The teacher population of - teachers has declined by 100% over five years.
Montgomery County Community College Community College Avg.
Institution Level At least 2 but less than 4 years At least 2 but less than 4 years
Institution Control Public institution Public

Student Body

The student population of 13,645 teachers has grown by 48% over five years.
The student:teacher ratio of 34:1 has increased from 32:1 over five years.
The school's diversity score of 0.32 is less than the state average of 0.45. The school's diversity has declined by 21% over five years.
Total Enrollment
13,645 students
1,283 students
Montgomery County Community College Total Enrollment (2006-2012)
# Full-Time Students
5,013 students
832 students
Montgomery County Community College Full-Time Students (2006-2012)
# Part-Time Students 8,632 students
1,020 students
Montgomery County Community College Part-Time Students (2006-2012)
Montgomery County Community College sch enrollment Montgomery County Community College sta enrollment
% American Indian/Alaskan
- 1%
% Asian
4%
2%
Montgomery County Community College Asian (2006-2012)
% Hawaiian
-
1%
% Hispanic
4%
7%
Montgomery County Community College Hispanic (2006-2012)
% Black
9%
12%
Montgomery County Community College Black (2006-2012)
% White
82%
66%
Montgomery County Community College White (2006-2012)
% Two or more races
1%
2%
Montgomery County Community College More (2010-2012)
Montgomery County Community College sch ethnicity Montgomery County Community College sta ethnicity
Diversity ScoreThe chance that two students selected at random would be members of a different ethnic group. Scored from 0 to 1, a diversity score closer to 1 indicates a more diverse student body. 0.32 0.45
Montgomery County Community College Diversity Score (2006-2012)

Finances and Admission

The in-state tuition of $7,710 is more than the state average of $5,940. The in-state tuition has grown by 22% over four years.
The out-state tuition of $11,370 is more than the state average of $10,075. The out-state tuition has grown by 22% over four years.
In-State Tuition Fees $7,710 $5,940
Montgomery County Community College In-State Tuition Fees (2009-2012)
Out-State Tuition Fees $11,370 $10,075
Montgomery County Community College Out-State Tuition Fees (2009-2012)
Source: 2012 (latest year available) IPEDS

School Notes:

Founded in 1964 and begun serving the community in 1966 from its initial location in Conshohocken, Pennsylvania. Since that time, the College has grown with the needs of the community, building its Central Campus in Blue Bell in 1972 and then opening the doors of the West Campus in Pottstown, in the fall of 1996. Along with these two campuses, the College offers distance learning opportunities as well as courses at various off-site locations, including the Willow Grove Naval Air Station and Lansdale. MCCC is the 4th most wired community college in the country. You can learn in one of our almost 40 smart classrooms, in one of our 26 computer classrooms, or on-line through one of our over 80 distance learning courses. The College offers four Associate Degrees (AA, AS, AAS, and AGS) in 90 degree and certificate programs in 40 areas of study. In 1998, the College created a new Liberal Studies degree (AS) that provides students with the strong general education core (36 credits) and flexibility to tailor electives (24 credits) to their transfer institution's program requirements. In fall 2004, approximately 55 percent of the College's students were enrolled in transfer-based programs, 38 percent were enrolled in occupational programs and 9 percent were enrolled in General Studies. The college is fully accredited by the Commission of Higher Education of the Middle States Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools.

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