Springfield Technical Community College

Tel: (413)781-7822
7,013 students
Public institution
Springfield Technical Community College, a leader in technology and instructional innovation, transforms lives through educational opportunities that promote personal and professional success.
School Highlights:
Springfield Technical Community College serves 7,013 students (44% of students are full-time).
Minority enrollment is 31% of the student body (majority Hispanic), which is equal to the state average of 31%.
Springfield Technical Community College is one of 2 community colleges within Hampden County, MA.
The nearest community college is Asnuntuck Community College (7.6 miles away).

School Overview

The teacher population of - teachers has declined by 100% over five years.
Springfield Technical Community College Community College Avg.
Institution Level At least 2 but less than 4 years At least 2 but less than 4 years
Institution Control Public institution Public

Student Body

The student population of 7,013 teachers has grown by 32% over five years.
The student:teacher ratio of 23:1 has increased from 17:1 over five years.
The school's diversity score of 0.48 is more than the state average of 0.45. The school's diversity has declined by 11% over five years.
Total Enrollment
7,013 students
1,275 students
Springfield Technical Community College Total Enrollment (2006-2012)
# Full-Time Students
3,104 students
829 students
Springfield Technical Community College Full-Time Students (2006-2012)
# Part-Time Students 3,909 students
1,020 students
Springfield Technical Community College Part-Time Students (2006-2012)
Springfield Technical Community College sch enrollment Springfield Technical Community College sta enrollment
% American Indian/Alaskan -
1%
% Asian 4%
2%
Springfield Technical Community College Asian (2006-2012)
% Hawaiian - 1%
% Hispanic 17%
7%
Springfield Technical Community College Hispanic (2006-2012)
% Black 10%
12%
Springfield Technical Community College Black (2006-2012)
% White 69%
66%
Springfield Technical Community College White (2006-2012)
% Two or more races -
2%
Springfield Technical Community College More (2010-2011)
Springfield Technical Community College sch ethnicity Springfield Technical Community College sta ethnicity
Diversity ScoreThe chance that two students selected at random would be members of a different ethnic group. Scored from 0 to 1, a diversity score closer to 1 indicates a more diverse student body. 0.48 0.45
Springfield Technical Community College Diversity Score (2006-2012)

Finances and Admission

The in-state tuition of $5,106 is less than the state average of $5,940. The in-state tuition has grown by 29% over four years.
The out-state tuition of $11,616 is more than the state average of $10,075. The out-state tuition has grown by 11% over four years.
In-State Tuition Fees $5,106 $5,940
Springfield Technical Community College In-State Tuition Fees (2009-2012)
Out-State Tuition Fees $11,616 $10,075
Springfield Technical Community College Out-State Tuition Fees (2009-2012)
Source: 2012 (latest year available) IPEDS

School Notes:

In the summer of 1967, STI moved into three buildings on the Armory grounds, and opened in September under the jurisdiction of the Massachusetts Board of Regional Community Colleges. In August 1968, the Institute's name was changed to Springfield Technical Community College. An initial enrollment of 400 students and a faculty of 20 began what is now one of the largest and most comprehensive community colleges in the Commonwealth, serving an increasingly diverse population. Springfield Technical Community College offers an exceptional and affordable education to prepare you for a rewarding career or to transfer to a four-year college. Students attend classes on a beautiful, historic campus where they find an experienced and caring faculty, a wide range of associate degree and certificate programs, a diverse student population and a host of services, resources and activities. STCC students enjoy small classes and individual attention, and then transfer to such fine local colleges as AIC, Springfield College, WNEC and ELMS College as well as nationally known institutions like Smith, Mt. Holyoke, Amherst, UMass, RPI, and Boston University. STCC offers 14 programs in Health, 27 programs in Engineering Technologies and 15 programs in Business/ Information Technologies. STCC is a national leader in Entrepreneurship Education. STCC is nationally recognized; major corporations such as IBM, Verizon, Microsoft, and Ford Motor Company have formed educational alliances with the College. The National Science Foundation, which awards very few grants to community colleges, has awarded 20 grants to STCC for projects such as building specialized labs, and has named STCC as the National Center for Telecommunications Technologies. Springfield Technical Community College is accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges, Inc., a non-governmental, nationally recognized organization whose affiliated institutions include elementary schools through collegiate institutions offering post-graduate education.

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