Joliet Junior College

1215 Houbolt Rd, Joliet
IL, 60431-8938
Tel: (815)729-9020
15,589 students
Public institution

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Joliet Junior College is committed to providing a quality education that is affordable and accessible to the diverse student population it serves. Through a rich variety of educational programs and support services, JJC prepares its students for success in higher education and employment. As part of this College's commitment to lifelong learning and services to its community, it also provides a broad spectrum of transitional, extension, adult, continuing and work force education.
School Highlights:
Joliet Junior College serves 15,589 students (39% of students are full-time).
Minority enrollment is 21% of the student body (majority Hispanic), which is less than the state average of 38%.
Joliet Junior College is the only community colleges within Will County, IL.
The nearest community college is ITT Technical Institute-Orland Park (15 miles away).

School Overview

The teacher population of - teachers has declined by 100% over five years.
Joliet Junior College Community College Avg.
Institution Level At least 2 but less than 4 years At least 2 but less than 4 years
Institution Control Public institution Public

Student Body

The student population of 15,589 teachers has grown by 18% over five years.
The student:teacher ratio of 35:1 has increased from 32:1 over five years.
The school's diversity score of 0.36 is less than the state average of 0.45. The school's diversity has declined by 20% over five years.
Total Enrollment
15,589 students
1,287 students
Joliet Junior College Total Enrollment (2006-2012)
# Full-Time Students
6,013 students
832 students
Joliet Junior College Full-Time Students (2006-2012)
# Part-Time Students 9,576 students
1,021 students
Joliet Junior College Part-Time Students (2006-2012)
Joliet Junior College sch enrollment Joliet Junior College sta enrollment
% American Indian/Alaskan
- 1%
% Asian
-
2%
Joliet Junior College Asian (2006-2011)
% Hawaiian
- 1%
% Hispanic
12%
7%
Joliet Junior College Hispanic (2006-2012)
% Black
7%
12%
Joliet Junior College Black (2006-2012)
% White
79%
66%
Joliet Junior College White (2006-2012)
% Two or more races
2%
2%
Joliet Junior College More (2010-2012)
Joliet Junior College sch ethnicity Joliet Junior College sta ethnicity
Diversity ScoreThe chance that two students selected at random would be members of a different ethnic group. Scored from 0 to 1, a diversity score closer to 1 indicates a more diverse student body. 0.36 0.45
Joliet Junior College Diversity Score (2006-2012)

Finances and Admission

The in-state tuition of $7,871 is more than the state average of $5,917. The in-state tuition has stayed relatively flat over four years.
The out-state tuition of $8,543 is less than the state average of $10,050. The out-state tuition has stayed relatively flat over four years.
In-State Tuition Fees $7,871 $5,917
Joliet Junior College In-State Tuition Fees (2009-2012)
Out-State Tuition Fees $8,543 $10,050
Joliet Junior College Out-State Tuition Fees (2009-2012)
Source: 2012 (latest year available) IPEDS

School Notes:

Joliet Junior College is a comprehensive community college. The college offers pre-baccalaureate programs for students planning to transfer to a four-year university, occupational education leading directly to employment, adult education and literacy programs, work force and workplace development services, and support services to help students succeed. JJC, America's oldest public community college, began in 1901 as an experimental postgraduate high school program. It was the "brain child" of J. Stanley Brown, Superintendent of Joliet Township High School, and William Rainey Harper, President of the University of Chicago. The college's initial enrollment was six students. Today, JJC serves more than 10,000 students in credit classes and 21,000 students in noncredit courses. Joliet Junior College's Main Campus is located at 1215 Houbolt Road, Joliet. The Main Campus facility boasts the Arthur G. and Vera C. Smith Business and Technology Center, a 90,000-square-foot building which houses several state-of-the-art microcomputer labs used by many of JJC's academic departments. In 2000, the college opened the Veterinary Technology and Industrial Training Building, which houses the faculty, classrooms and laboratories of the Veterinary Medical Technology degree program and facilities for the Institute of Economic Technology to conduct industrial training programs for business and industry. The Main Campus also has a full-service cafeteria, kitchen for Culinary Arts students, the Fine Arts Theatre, the Laura A. Sprague Art Gallery, the Herbert Trackman Planetarium, the Cyber Caf�, the Fitness Center, gymnasium, business offices, including the President's Office, human resources, financial aid, registration and payment center, and many other amenities.

Get admissions information on Joliet Junior College and online degrees at CampusExplorer.com.

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