Western Wyoming Community College

Tel: (307)382-1600
3,834 students
Public institution
Western Wyoming Community College is under the control of a locally elected Board of Trustees responsible for governing Western Wyoming Community College District. It is a public, tax-supported, co-educational, two-year community college.
School Highlights:
Western Wyoming Community College serves 3,834 students (34% of students are full-time).
Minority enrollment is 11% of the student body (majority Hispanic), which is less than the state average of 52%.
Western Wyoming Community College is the only community colleges within Sweetwater County, WY.

School Overview

The teacher population of - teachers has declined by 100% over five years.
Western Wyoming Community College Community College Avg.
Institution Level At least 2 but less than 4 years At least 2 but less than 4 years
Institution Control Public institution Public

Student Body

The student population of 3,834 teachers has grown by 13% over five years.
The student:teacher ratio of 27:1 has increased from 24:1 over five years.
The school's diversity score of 0.20 is less than the state average of 0.45. The school's diversity has grown by 17% over five years.
Total Enrollment
3,834 students
1,287 students
Western Wyoming Community College Total Enrollment (2006-2012)
# Full-Time Students
1,320 students
832 students
Western Wyoming Community College Full-Time Students (2006-2012)
# Part-Time Students 2,514 students
1,021 students
Western Wyoming Community College Part-Time Students (2006-2012)
Western Wyoming Community College sch enrollment Western Wyoming Community College sta enrollment
% American Indian/Alaskan
-
1%
% Asian
1%
2%
Western Wyoming Community College Asian (2006-2012)
% Hawaiian
- 1%
% Hispanic
9%
7%
Western Wyoming Community College Hispanic (2006-2012)
% Black
2%
12%
Western Wyoming Community College Black (2006-2012)
% White
89%
66%
Western Wyoming Community College White (2006-2012)
% Two or more races"
- 2%
Western Wyoming Community College sch ethnicity Western Wyoming Community College sta ethnicity
Diversity ScoreThe chance that two students selected at random would be members of a different ethnic group. Scored from 0 to 1, a diversity score closer to 1 indicates a more diverse student body. 0.20 0.45
Western Wyoming Community College Diversity Score (2006-2012)

Finances and Admission

The in-state tuition of $2,186 is less than the state average of $5,940. The in-state tuition has grown by 9% over four years.
The out-state tuition of $5,786 is less than the state average of $10,072. The out-state tuition has grown by 10% over four years.
In-State Tuition Fees $2,186 $5,940
Western Wyoming Community College In-State Tuition Fees (2009-2012)
Out-State Tuition Fees $5,786 $10,072
Western Wyoming Community College Out-State Tuition Fees (2009-2012)
Source: 2012 (latest year available) IPEDS

School Notes:

Western's fundamental purpose is to provide high quality learning opportunities to students who are at various stages of life and have differing needs and expectations. Committed to quality and success, Western encourages flexibility, innovation, and active learning for students, faculty and staff. The College understands that learning occurs inside and outside the classroom and, therefore, seeks to create an environment where lifelong learning is encouraged and where students and employees interact in an atmosphere of mutual respect. Western Wyoming Community College, the fifth of seven community colleges in Wyoming, was established in the Fall of 1959. In 1960-61, the College moved to Reliance, five miles from Rock Springs, to occupy the former Reliance High School and daytime classes began. In September, 1964, the original district was expanded to include all communities within Sweetwater County. Consistent growth of the College led to the inauguration of a $1,822,000 building program on October 4, 1966. On November 11, 1967, ground-breaking ceremonies marked the beginning of construction on a new campus, and completion in June, 1969. Growth continued. In March, 1973, voters approved a $1,780,000 bond issue to provide additional instructional facilities. The new vocational-technical education building was ready for occupancy in Fall, 1974, and the college center building was completed. In 1976, three residence halls were constructed to provide on-campus housing, made possible by a loan from the State Farm Loan Board. The college offers Occupational and Transfer Programs in Arts & Performing Arts, Business, Computer Science and Office Information Systems, Education, Health, Humanities & Communication, Math & Science, Social Science, Technology & Industry Programs Technology & Industry Programs and General Studies. The college offers Associate of Applied Science (A.A.S), Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Fine Arts (A.F.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.) degrees and One Year Certificate Programs and Certification Testing. Western Wyoming Community College is accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges & Schools.

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  • College Loaction Mi. Students
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