Save $80K by First Attending Community College

Updated |
Save $80K by First Attending Community College
Learn how you can save over $80,000 by first attending community college then transferring to a private institution.
With the dramatically rising costs of tuition, many families are turning towards the financially-savvy decision of starting on the higher education path first at a two-year community college.   Many universities, both public and private, have articulation agreements with local community colleges. Therefore, attending a community college for two years before transferring to a four-year institution can save significant amounts of money – while still providing you with an excellent bachelor’s degree from the university of your choice. 
 
According to the College Board, for the 2007 – 2008 school year, community college’s average tuition and fees are $2,360. This is in contrast to $6,185 at a public four-year institution, or $23,712 for a private four year institution. 
 
Calculating the specific academic savings
 
For example, let us calculate the savings if you begin your academic career at Pasadena City College, which has articulation transfer agreements with the public UC campuses and the private University of Southern California. 
 
If you are a resident of California and attend Pasadena City College full-time, which is based upon 12 units, then you have the following annual academic costs:
 
- Tuition and Fees: $508
 
- Books and school supplies: $1500
 
In contrast, at the private University of Southern California, you have the following full-time annual academic costs:
 
- Tuition and fees: $30,850
 
- Books: $1,000
 
At a public, University of California campus, the annual full-time academic costs for a California resident are:
 
-  Tuition and Fees: $8,385
 
- Books: 1,300 
 
If you attended Pasadena Community College for the first two years, your tuition and books would only cost $4,016. At a
. . .read more
Updated |
Community College Students Need Parent Encouragement
Learn tips on how to support your child during during their transition to community college.
An increasing number of high school students are going directly from high school into community colleges to begin their higher education. Many of these students still live with their parents for financial or other reasons. Many parents of these traditional students want to help their children make the transition from secondary school to college. This article discusses the instrumental role parents can play in encouraging a young student's move from high school into community college. The article contains tips for parents seeking to be supportive and suggests questions parents can ask to demonstrate their interest. Using these tips and suggestions, parents can show support for a child in community college without jeopardizing the child's new independence and responsibility as a college student.
 
Background
 
According to the latest statistics compiled by the American Association of Community Colleges, 43 percent of community college students are age 21 or younger. Some of these are traditional students, or students who proceeded directly from high school to college. Some traditional students attend community college to avoid the rising tuition costs at public and private four-year institutions. Some students are not ready to leave home and prefer to stay with or near their parents for the first two years of college. Unlike older students, traditional students may not have the maturity and savvy which are required to make their way in a new environment.
 
Parents as "First Responders" When Community College Students Need Help
 
There is a well-founded concern about the low retention rate at community colleges. Students are
. . .read more
Updated |
Transferring from Community College to a 4-year Institution
Learn about the steps you need to take to successfully transfer from a community college to a 4-year institution.
Are you considering attending a community college before transferring to a four year university? Nearly 11 million students each year attend community college. Some choose community college to save thousands of dollars on tuition for the first two years of schooling, while others opt to attend community college to determine which major interests them most.   Regardless of why you choose to attend community college, with a few phases of planning, you can transfer to the university and major that are right for your higher learning.  
 
Many students choose to begin their careers at community college before transferring to a four-year institution. Considering that the University of California Regents reported that approximately 30% of all the UC awarded bachelor’s degrees were given to students who transferred from community colleges, you are not alone. 
 
The time that you take to plan out your community college curriculum will pay off significantly in helping you gain acceptance into the university of your choice, along with transferring valuable credits. The key to successfully transferring to a four year institution begins with early planning. This ensures that your credits not only transfer, but that the classes you take put in the best academic light possible. 
 
 
Step 1: Befriend your academic counselor
 
One of the least utilized resources is your academic counselor, whose goal is to help you succeed…academically!   One of the first things you should do during your transfer planning is to meet with your academic counselor as soon as possible. Tell your counselor what your plans and
. . .read more
Updated |
Can Community Colleges Cure the Economy?
Learn about recent government recommendations for community colleges and their role in our nation's competitiveness.
Do community colleges hold the key for curing an ailing U.S. economy? That is one conclusion in the Report of the National Commission on Community Colleges entitled "Winning the Skills Race and Strengthening America's Middle Class: An Action Agenda for Community Colleges" (the Report). The Commission took a comprehensive look at the fundamental role of community colleges in maximizing our nation's ability to compete in a global economy. The Commission's findings and recommendations are discussed in this article.
 
Background
 
In 2005, the College Board established the Center for Innovative Thought (the Center) to identify challenges to America's education system and recommend solutions. Convinced that community colleges are the nation's overlooked asset, the Center formed the National Commission on Community Colleges to investigate means for improving and expanding the role of community colleges in the future. The Commission is composed of chair Augustine P. Gallego, Chancellor Emeritus of San Diego Community College District, and ten community college presidents or immediate past presidents. The Commission released its Report in January 2008. The Report looks at the present state of community colleges, identifies numerous challenges facing the U.S., and recommends taking action that will place community colleges in the forefront of meeting these challenges. The College Board applauded the Report and pledged to contribute the Board's expertise in implementing the Report's recommendations.
 
Present Status of Community Colleges
 
The 1,202 community colleges in the U.S. enroll approximately 11.6 million credit and non-credit students. The average age of the community college student is 29. About 34 percent
. . .read more
Updated |
Careers After Community College
Learn about fast-growing careers and degrees community college grads are pursuing.
Many students who are considering attending community college want to know what their career opportunities are after graduating. If you are contemplating community college, then you are in for good news! 
 
The professional prospects for a community college grad are very promising. According to the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC), who analyzed data presented by the US Department of Education and College Board, the average community college graduate earns significant more than a high school graduate. When it comes to the average expected lifetime earnings, those with an associate’s degree earn $1.6 million, which is significant more than the $.4 million a high school graduate will earn. From this perspective alone, graduating from community college will earn your bank account an extra $1.2 million in your lifetime!  
 
Popular community college majors
 
Although the majors and careers found in community college are quite diverse, ranging from art to zoology, there are several majors that are highly popular, according to the AACC. The five most popular majors in community college are: 
  • Computer technologies – 1,017 programs throughout community colleges
  • Registered nursing – 755 programs offered in community colleges
  • Law enforcement – 751 programs offered nationally through community colleges 
  • Licensed practical nursing – 528 programs throughout community colleges
  • Radiology – 269 programs offered through community colleges
The working applications of community college
 
The AACC estimates that there are 11 million students enrolled in community college; with the sheer numbers of the community college student population, employers have taken note of the high caliber of talent that emerges from community college. According to surveys conducted by
. . .read more
View Pages:<<Prev  121 122 123 124 125  Next>>
Recent Articles
We report on the recent increases in Stafford Loan Rates, which have led to some community colleges across the country discontinuing this option for financial aid.
Attending college is expensive but there are options for financing beyond just student loans. Keep reading to learn more.
College is expensive enough without the added cost of medical school on top of it. If you're on a pre-med track, consider taking some of your prerequisites at community college. Keep reading to learn more.