Degrees

Community colleges have been expanding course and degree offerings. This section provides information on your options, from GED to a bachelor’s degree. Learn how you can benefit from a professional certification, find out which community colleges are offering bachelor’s degrees, and identify the top degree-producing colleges.
View the most popular articles in Degrees:
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5 Tips for Pre-med Students Attending Community College
College is expensive enough without the added cost of medical school on top of it. If you're on a pre-med track, consider taking some of your prerequisites at community college. Keep reading to learn more.

The base salary for a physician is around $190,000 with some specialties earning well over $500,000 per year. As much as doctors get paid, however, they accrue a lot of debt over the course of their education. The average yearly cost of medical school is over $200,000 and most doctors graduate with over $400,000 in student loans.

According to a 2010 study, roughly 40% of American undergraduate students attend community college but only 5% of students who enrolled in medical school in 2012 had attended community college. Because medical school is so expensive, it is worth it to consider taking premed classes at community college and then transferring to a four-year university to finish out the degree.

Keep reading to learn more about how medical schools view community college credits and to receive tips for premed students attending community college.

How Do Med Schools View Community College Credits?

Getting into medical school is no easy task. Not only do you have to complete a rigorous undergraduate degree, but you also have to find a way to stand out among thousands of applicants. Though it is important to position yourself well to stand out in the crowd, your primary concern as a premedical student should be to learn and understand the content of your premed classes. Taking some of these classes at community college can save you money so you’re able to focus on what really matters instead of worrying about how you’re going to pay your tuition.

Many people assume that colleges favor

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Is a Community College Bachelor’s Degree a Smart Choice?
In recent years, community colleges have been granted permission to offer four-year degrees. For some, this represents a great opportunity to get an education at an affordable price. But for others, worry with regard to the quality of these newly established programs is a point of concern.
The lure of an affordable college education brings countless thousands of students just like you to community college campuses each semester. With a greater breadth and depth of course offerings and degree programs available than ever before, community colleges represent excellent value for many students who seek to build their skills for future educational and career endeavors. Now, in addition to many associate’s degrees and professional certificate programs, community colleges throughout the country are offering select bachelor’s degree programs, furthering the appeal of the community college route. However, despite many advantages to these programs they are not for everyone.
 
Degree Programs Around the Nation
 
The movement to allow community colleges to offer four-year degrees is borne out of the needs of the modern workforce. Education and economic officials recognize that with major gaps in the workforce in the areas of healthcare, energy exploration, and information technology in particular, new workers need to be trained. Community colleges represent an excellent opportunity to train these workers because they are typically at the forefront of educational innovation and are much more able to respond to the changing needs of the workforce that is a four-year institution.
 
This new wave of educational opportunity is present in all corners of the country. More than a dozen community colleges in Washington State now offer baccalaureate degrees. More than two-dozen two-year institutions in Florida offer four-year degree options. Texas, Hawaii, and West Virginia community colleges have gotten on board with offering bachelor’s degree programs as well. In fact,
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Four-Year Degrees at Community College? Many Schools Now Say Yes
What is the latest on four-year degree programs at community colleges? We look at some of the states entering into this relatively new frontier, and why some are having a tough time selling the idea.
Community colleges have traditionally been considered the go-to place for two-year vocational degrees or general college coursework for students that have plans to transfer to a four-year college or university. However, these institutions of higher education are increasing their program offerings to include a smattering of four-year degree options as well. Although not without their share of opposition, the four-year degree is slowly but surely becoming more common at the community college level. Check out these states and schools delving into the frontier of the four-year degree program.
 
Chattanooga State Considers Addition of Five Four-Year Programs
 
A community college in Tennessee is looking at adding five new programs to their current catalog selections. The Chattanoogan reports that Chattanooga State Community College is considering the addition of four-year degree programs in a variety of high-tech fields. The president of the college, Dr. Jim Cantanzaro, applied for approval of the programs last summer and is still waiting for a response from the Tennessee Board of Regents.
 
The community college would like to add four-year degree programs in chemical process engineering, radiological sciences, nuclear engineering, technology management, and mechatronics engineering. The programs were specifically chosen based on the local employment needs of the current workforce. Dr. Cantanzaro made it clear the goal of the program addition was to fulfill those professional needs and not to transform Chattanooga State into a full-fledged four-year school.
 
Dr. Cantanzaro also explained that 60 percent of the material in the new degree programs would be
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Top 100 Degree-Producing Community Colleges
Which community colleges produce the greatest number of degrees? We analyze a report that details the top producing community colleges across the country.
Community colleges have become the main focus of higher education in recent years, as the United States strives to fill the workforce needs of the 21st century. Completion rates for community colleges are more important than ever before, as students must complete their training programs to become productive members of the global marketplace. To help prospective students locate the community colleges with the greatest odds of success, Community College Week releases annual analyses of the community colleges that produce the most associate degrees each academic year.
 
About the Analysis
 
The data for the annual Top 100 Analysis is collected by the National Center for Education Statistics. The list includes associate degrees earned during the 2010-2011 school year, with total degrees earned and breakdowns according to race. The breakdowns were handled by a two-question format students were asked to answer, according to the website for Community College Week. Students were first asked if they were of Hispanic or Latino heritage, and then they were asked to check off various races that applied to them, including African American, Native American and Asian American.
 
This year’s analysis found record increases in the number of associate degrees earned over the past three years. As associate degrees appear to be on the rise, certificate programs, which can usually be earned in less than two years, seem to be on the decline. It is also interesting to note that the number of associate degrees earned at public community colleges was just 61 percent. Proprietary institutions (
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The Benefits of Professional Certification from Your Local Community College
Forget the degree! Many community college students are landing good jobs with just a community college professional certificate.
While many college students today are opting for a two-year degree over four years in school, there is an even shorter option to consider. Community college students are finding that certificate programs can be completed in much less time, yet reap the same employment benefits as a full degree program. Check out these benefits of professional certification from your local community college.
 

Consider the Statistics

While many are still out of work in the United States, millions of jobs remain unfilled. Why? There are no skilled workers to fill the slots, according to a report at CNN Money. Employers need workers who can come right into a position with the necessary training and experience. However, much of that training is not available through four-year universities. Instead, students must turn to schools that are providing the specific training employers in the community require. This is the important void that community colleges are learning to fill – and often through certification and licensing programs.
 
This video compares a professional certificate vs. a master's degree.
 
 
Fast Turnaround
 
Community college degree programs typically take around two years to complete, but certification programs can take significantly less time. AOL Jobs estimates that most certificate programs range in length from six months to one year. In addition, coursework for these types of programs is often offered in the evenings or on weekends for students who are trying to juggle current family and professional responsibilities. In some cases, classes can even
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Degrees