Student Issues / Attending College

Academics, extracurricular activities, housing and more: be savvy about all facets of attending community college. Get tips on making the Dean's list. Find ways to benefit from community college outside the classroom. Analyze the latest data on graduation and employment rates. Plus news from journals, blogs and more.
View the most popular articles in Student Issues / Attending College:
Published |
Understanding the Different Types of College Degrees and How to Choose
Choosing a college major can be tough, but you also need to think about choosing the right type of degree. Keep reading to learn about the five different types of college degrees and your earning potential for each one.

The world of higher education is a wide one with many different options. Whether you choose to attend community college or a traditional college or university, there are a number of different degrees to choose from and each one offers unique potential in terms of your future career.   

Before you apply to college, you should consider your field as well as the type of degree you intend to pursue. Not every job requires a college degree, but many do – there are also many careers where you are unlikely to succeed without an advanced degree.

Keep reading to learn about the five different types of college degree, the common career paths for each of those degrees and how to choose the right degree for you.

The Five Types of College Degrees

One of the main benefits of earning a college degree is that it increases your earning potential – college graduates simply earn more than non-degree holders in most fields. Outside of higher income potential, the process of earning your degree opens you up to a whole new world of learning and you develop skills you may not have had before. Having a degree typically means better job security, more career options, and more personal development along the way.

The benefits of having a degree are many, but not all degrees are created equal. Here is an overview of the five different types of college degree:

  1. Associate Degree (ex: Associate of Arts or Associate of Science)
  2. Bachelor’s Degree (ex: Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of
. . .read more
Published |
Can You Still Get into Community College with Bad Grades?
To a graduating high school senior, grades are everything. But how do colleges view bad grades and can you still get into college without a perfect GPA? Keep reading to find out.

High school is a stressful period for young adults. Between the struggles with changing hormones, social pressures, and academics all rolled into a four-year span, it can be quite overwhelming.

Some students handle the pressure of high school better than others, and some are simply better at school for whatever reason. Poor grades are sometimes viewed as an indicator of laziness, but that is not always the case. For many students, poor grades are a small piece of the puzzle. Many students struggle with basic study skills or test taking while others have difficulty with learning disabilities, distractions at home, or other issues that affect their academic success.

For many students, getting good grades feels like the only thing that matters. After all, good grades are what gets a student into college. Or are they?

College admissions have changed significantly over the years. Today, colleges want to see their students be well-rounded individuals with real-life experience and a direction for their future. Grades are still a key indicator of discipline and academic potential, but they aren’t everything. Even if you have poor grades, you can still get into college.

In this article, we’ll talk about the importance of grades and how much they really matter for college applications. We’ll also discuss some strategies to address poor grades in your college applications to increase your chances of being accepted.

Do Grades Really Matter for Community College?

There is a common misconception that community college is somehow below traditional colleges and universities. While community colleges accept

. . .read more
Published |
How Community Colleges Are Changing Remedial Education
Remedial education exists to help struggling students succeed in college-level classes. Unfortunately, the existing model may be doing more harm than good. Keep reading to learn more about the history of remedial education and what community colleges are doing to change it.

Community colleges provide educational opportunities for many students who might not otherwise have access to higher education. First-generation college students, single parents, and other nontraditional students make up a significant percentage of the community college population.

For those who enter community college straight after high school and for those who have already completed some higher-level course work, community college is a less challenging transition than for those who have been out of school for years or who are pursuing higher education for the first time. Many nontraditional students struggle when there is a gap between what they already know when they set foot on campus for the first time and what they are expected to know.

That’s where remedial education comes in. Unfortunately, a review of years of remedial education has revealed that, instead of helping students succeed in their college careers, it acts as a brick wall that prevents them moving forward. Keep reading to learn more about the history of remedial education and what community colleges are doing to change it.

What is Remedial Education?

Remedial education exists at all levels of education from grade school to post-secondary education. A remedial program is typically designed to close the gap between what a student knows and what they are expected to know, typically in math and reading courses. Simply put, remedial instruction is designed to help struggling students strengthen their basic skills to help them succeed.

In a primary education setting, remedial programs often serve to help struggling students improve their reading

. . .read more
Published |
Five Things Every Recent Community College Graduate Should Do
You've graduated from community college - now what? Keep reading to learn what to do after you've finished college.

After years of school, finally entering the “real world” is certainly cause for celebration. Graduating from college is an incredible achievement and with it comes unlimited opportunities for the future.

But what exactly do you do after you graduate from community college? What are your first steps?

Many community college students spend so much time and effort focusing on passing their classes and keeping up their GPA that they fail to really think about what comes next. You don’t necessarily need to plan the next ten years of your life down to the finest detail, but you should have some kind of game plan in place for when you finish school. If you aren’t quite sure what to do after you finish community college, here are five suggestions.

1. Update Your Resume and Beef Up Your Interview Skills

The whole point of going to college is to get the education and experience you need to land your dream job. Just because you have the right degree, however, doesn’t guarantee that you’ll get the job you want. You need to make yourself look valuable to potential employers and that largely comes down to two things – your resume and your interview skills.

When you apply for a job, potential employers will look at your resume first. If they don’t like what they see, you’re unlikely to make it past that first round of cuts and you probably won’t get an interview. You could be the most charismatic person in the world, capable of crushing every

. . .read more
Updated |
Tips for Community College Grads to Break the Millenial Stereotype
The millennial generation is assumed to be entitled, lazy, and tech-obsessed. When you graduate from college, you may find yourself working against these stereotypes to land your first job. Keep reading to learn some tips for breaking those millennial stereotypes.

There was a time when obtaining a college degree almost guaranteed you a job after graduation. Unfortunately, that no longer seems to be the case. Hundreds of thousands of college graduates enter the “real world” each year and many of them struggle to find a job in their field, no less a job at all.

Many college graduates find that entry-level positions require work experience – experience which they can’t get if no one will give them a job. Add to that the challenge of being labeled a “millennial,” and finding steady employment after graduation is like finding a diamond in the rough.

So, how do you break through the millennial stereotype to land your first job? Keep reading to learn what the top millennial stereotypes are and how to overcome them to get a job.

This TEDx Talk by Keevin O'Rourke discusses How to Make Millennials Want to Work for You.

What Are the Most Common Stereotypes About Millenials?

First and foremost, it needs to be established exactly what a millennial is. There is some confusion regarding which ages fall into the millennial category, but most researchers agree that millennials are the generation born between 1980 and 1996. People born during this generation have been assigned all kinds of labels including lazy and entitled. The more these labels are used, the more they perpetuate the stereotype – a stereotype that may or may not have any foundation in truth. Here are some of the most common stereotypes

. . .read more
View Pages:<<Prev  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10  Next>>
Recent Articles
Take advantage of career opportunities in the field of radio broadcasting by starting your training at your local community college.
Being a single parent is difficult (and expensive) but it shouldn't stop you from furthering your education. Read on to learn how to pay for community college as a single parent.
If you're preparing to apply to college, use your summer wisely and complete a few college visits. Read on to learn how to plan and how to get the most from each visit.
Student Issues

Extracurricular Activities

Community college can be fun and socially enriching, especially with the right extracurricular activities. Reasons to join the debate club, volunteer opportunities and wellness programs are just a few topics covered here. Explore the benefits of community college outside of the classroom, from holiday celebrations to athletic programs, schools are finding ways to keep students engaged on campus.

Graduation

Graduation rates, policies, and caps - oh my! This section covers all topics related to community college graduations. How does state spending impact graduation rates? Who are the oldest community college graduates? What initiatives are in place to stem the rate of dropouts? Find the answers to these questions and more.

Community College Housing

The number of community colleges offering on-campus housing is on the rise. Learn more about campus living options, compare the pros and cons of dorm life, and get help deciding what housing is best for you.

Improving Learning

Get helpful tips and expert advice on boosting your GPA. This section will provide valuable tips on studying, mentor programs and how to avoid academic probation. Examine the latest trends in student motivation techniques, take a good look at online learning, and find resources to guide you on the path to success.

Improving Your Job Search

Whether you have just enrolled in community college or you’re ready to graduate and enter the job market, our articles can help improve your opportunities of landing the perfect job. Internships and apprenticeships offer lots of benefits, find out how participation in these programs can move your resume to the top of the pile. Analyze employment data for community college graduates and determine who is getting hired. Get valuable tips on polishing your candidacy and making the most of job fairs.

Class Schedules

- Do you need child care? Are you employed full-time? Community colleges offer a variety of scheduling options, allowing most students to easily integrate continued education into an already busy schedule. From weekend classes to courses at midnight, we cover the gamut of flexible class schedules at community college.