Most Selective Community Colleges in Ohio

  • The average community college acceptance rate in Ohio is approximately 81% per year.
  • The most selective college in Ohio is currently Mercy College of Ohio, with an acceptance rate of 57%.

Most Selective Community Colleges in Ohio

  • College Acceptance Rate Location
  • Mercy College of Ohio
    Private, non-profit
    57%
    2221 Madison Avenue
    Toledo OH  43604
    (419)251-1313
  • AIC College of Design
    Private, for profit
    60%
    1171 East Kemper Road
    Cincinnati OH  45246
    (513)751-1206
  • 66%
    1725 E David Rd
    Dayton OH  45440
    (937)294-0592
  • 73%
    14445 Broadway Ave
    Cleveland OH  44125
    (216)475-7520
  • ATS Institute of Technology
    Private, for profit
    75%
    325 Alpha Park Dr
    Cleveland OH  44143
    (440)449-1700
  • 76%
    2139 Auburn Avenue
    Cincinnati OH  45219
    (513)585-0032
  • 79%
    375 Dixmyth Ave
    Cincinnati OH  45220
    (513)862-2631
  • 80%
    1505 Holland Road
    Maumee OH  43537
    (419)720-6670
  • Hondros College
    Private, for profit
    89%
    4140 Executive Parkway
    Westerville OH  43081
    (855)906-8773
  • 100%
    11724 Detroit Avenue
    Lakewood OH  44107
    (216)221-8584
  • 100%
    1600 South Arlington Street, Suite 100
    Akron OH  44306
    (330)724-1600
  • Herzing University-Toledo
    Private, for profit
    100%
    5212 Hill Ave
    Toledo OH  43615
    (419)776-0300
  • Aultman College
    Private, non-profit
    100%
    2600 6th St SW
    Canton OH  44710
    (330)363-6347
Recent Articles
December 01, 2017
Learn about trending community college topics this week such as San Francisco's move toward free tuition at community colleges and the rise in hunger and homelessness among community college students across the country.
December 01, 2017
This summer will be wrapping up before we know of it, and your first semester at community college is rapidly approaching. Are you ready for it?
December 01, 2017
To encourage students to pursue higher education, some states are considering plans to offer zero-tuition programs at public community colleges. These programs could make college a reality for many young people, however, critics argue such programs would cost taxpayers a significant amount of money.