Most Selective Community Colleges in Massachusetts

  • The average community college acceptance rate in Massachusetts is approximately 71% per year.
  • The most selective college in Massachusetts is currently Bay State College, with an acceptance rate of 50%.

Most Selective Community Colleges in Massachusetts

  • College Acceptance Rate Location
  • Bay State College
    Private, for profit
    50%
    122 Commonwealth Avenue
    Boston MA  02116
    6172179000
  • Becker College
    Private, non-profit
    62%
    61 Sever St
    Worcester MA  01609
    (877)523-2537
  • Bay Path University
    Private, non-profit
    63%
    588 Longmeadow Street
    Longmeadow MA  01106
    (413)565-1000
  • Dean College
    Private, non-profit
    68%
    99 Main Street
    Franklin MA  02038
    5085411508
  • Mount Ida College
    Private, non-profit
    68%
    777 Dedham Street
    Newton Center MA  02459
    (617)928-4500
  • Newbury College
    Private, non-profit
    70%
    129 Fisher Ave
    Brookline MA  02445
    (617)730-7000
  • Lasell College
    Private, non-profit
    76%
    1844 Commonwealth Avenue
    Auburndale MA  02466
    (617)243-2000
  • FINE Mortuary College
    Private, for profit
    77%
    150 Kerry Place
    Norwood MA  02062
    7817621211
  • Bard College at Simon's Rock
    Private, non-profit
    89%
    84 Alford Road
    Great Barrington MA  01230
    (413)644-4400
  • Laboure College
    Private, non-profit
    90%
    303 Adams Street
    Milton MA  02186
    (617)296-8300
Recent Articles
December 01, 2017
Learn about trending community college topics this week such as San Francisco's move toward free tuition at community colleges and the rise in hunger and homelessness among community college students across the country.
December 01, 2017
This summer will be wrapping up before we know of it, and your first semester at community college is rapidly approaching. Are you ready for it?
December 01, 2017
To encourage students to pursue higher education, some states are considering plans to offer zero-tuition programs at public community colleges. These programs could make college a reality for many young people, however, critics argue such programs would cost taxpayers a significant amount of money.