Carolinas College of Health Sciences

1200 Blythe Blvd, Charlotte
NC, 28203-2861
Tel: (704)355-5043
445 students
Public institution
Carolinas College of Health Sciences is a subsidiary of Carolinas HealthCare System, the nation's third largest non-profit healthcare system, giving our students extensive clinical opportunities at Carolinas HealthCare System facilities.
School Highlights:
Carolinas College of Health Sciences serves 445 students (13% of students are full-time).
Minority enrollment is 21% of the student body (majority Black and Hispanic), which is less than the state average of 30%.
Carolinas College of Health Sciences is one of 7 community colleges within Mecklenburg County, NC.
The nearest community college is Central Piedmont Community College (1.3 miles away).

School Overview

The teacher population of - teachers has declined by 100% over five years.
Carolinas College of Health Sciences Community College Avg.
Institution Level At least 2 but less than 4 years At least 2 but less than 4 years
Institution Control Public institution Public

Student Body

The student population of 445 teachers has declined by 8% over five years.
The student:teacher ratio of 8:1 has decreased from 11:1 over five years.
The school's diversity score of 0.36 is less than the state average of 0.45. The school's diversity has grown by 43% over five years.
Total Enrollment
445 students
1,275 students
Carolinas College of Health Sciences Total Enrollment (2006-2012)
# Full-Time Students
60 students
829 students
Carolinas College of Health Sciences Full-Time Students (2006-2012)
# Part-Time Students 385 students
1,020 students
Carolinas College of Health Sciences Part-Time Students (2006-2012)
Carolinas College of Health Sciences sch enrollment Carolinas College of Health Sciences sta enrollment
% American Indian/Alaskan 1%
1%
% Asian 4%
2%
Carolinas College of Health Sciences Asian (2006-2012)
% Hawaiian 1%
1%
% Hispanic 5%
7%
Carolinas College of Health Sciences Hispanic (2006-2012)
% Black 9%
12%
Carolinas College of Health Sciences Black (2006-2012)
% White 79%
66%
Carolinas College of Health Sciences White (2006-2012)
% Two or more races 1%
2%
Carolinas College of Health Sciences More (2010-2012)
Carolinas College of Health Sciences sch ethnicity Carolinas College of Health Sciences sta ethnicity
Diversity ScoreThe chance that two students selected at random would be members of a different ethnic group. Scored from 0 to 1, a diversity score closer to 1 indicates a more diverse student body. 0.36 0.45
Carolinas College of Health Sciences Diversity Score (2006-2012)

Finances and Admission

The in-state tuition of - is less than the state average of $5,940. The in-state tuition has stayed relatively flat over four years.
The out-state tuition of - is less than the state average of $10,075. The out-state tuition has stayed relatively flat over four years.
Percent Admitted 41%
78%
Carolinas College of Health Sciences Percent Admitted (2006-2012)
SAT Total Avg. 1,035
940
Carolinas College of Health Sciences sat total (2006-2012)
SAT Reading 505
465
Carolinas College of Health Sciences sat reading (2006-2012)
SAT Math 530
475
Carolinas College of Health Sciences sat math (2006-2012)
Source: 2012 (latest year available) IPEDS

School Notes:

Carolinas College of Health Sciences is on the campus of Carolinas Medical Center (CMC), the area's only Level I trauma center. The college features a well-equipped computer lab, simulation labs and biology labs. Carolinas College of Health Sciences has a proud tradition of educating the region's best nurses and allied health providers. We offer a small-school environment with big-hospital opportunities and experiences. In the late 1980s, Carolinas HealthCare System administration recognized the need for a school and established the CMHA School of Nursing. A feasibility study was conducted in 1989 to validate the need for nurses at the local and statewide level. Degree granting authority was obtained through the Hospital Authority Act [NC General Stat 113E-23 (a)(31)] and was delegated to the school by the Board of Commissioners. In December 1993, CMHA's Board of Commissioners passed a resolution to incorporate the CMHA School of Nursing and to appoint a board of directors for the school. Degree granting authority was delegated to the board of directors. The school was located on Blythe Boulevard on the Carolinas Medical Center campus in metropolitan Charlotte, NC. The school moved into the newly renovated Rankin Education Center in July 1994. Academic programs are offered in Nursing, Pre-Nursing, Emergency Medical Sciences, Radiologic Technology, Surgical Technology, Medical Technology, General Education, Nurse Aide I, Phlebotomy and CPR / Life Support Courses. Carolinas College of Health Sciences is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS) to award the Associate of Applied Science degree. The college also offers diploma and certificate-level educational programs.

Nearby Schools:

  • College Loaction Mi. Students
  • Charlotte Central Piedmont Community College
    Public
    1201 Elizabeth Avenue
    Charlotte , NC , 28204
    (704)330-2722
    1.3  Mi  |  17850  students
  • Dallas Gaston College
    Public
    201 Hwy 321 S
    Dallas , NC , 28034
    (704)922-6200
    20.2  Mi  |  6002  students
  • Rock Hill York Technical College
    Public
    452 S Anderson Rd
    Rock Hill , SC , 29730
    (803)327-8000
    20.4  Mi  |  4849  students
  • Concord Cabarrus College of Health Sciences
    Private not-for-profit
    401 Medical Park Drive
    Concord , NC , 28025
    (704)403-1555
    21.2  Mi  |  484  students
  • Rock Hill Clinton Junior College
    Private not-for-profit
    1029 Crawford Rd
    Rock Hill , SC , 29730
    (803)327-7402
    22.9  Mi  |  148  students
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