Tuition

This section will help you prepare for the costs of attending community college and any future increases. Explore pricing plans, learn where you may be able to attend community college tuition-free, and examine the latest initiatives to make higher education more affordable.
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Updated December 03, 2015 |
Unique Ways to Pay for Your Community College Tuition
Tuition expenses continue to rise each and every year, forcing students to find ever more creative ways to raise money. In this article you will find plenty of creative ways to raise money for school.
Learn how to earn money for community college tuition.
The average published yearly tuition for a private 4-year college is about $31,000 and, for a public university it is about $23,000 for out-of-state students. For many people, paying this much for college simply isn’t possible – the cost of tuition in many cases is more than the average person makes in a year. For this reason, more and more students are turning to community colleges because they are generally more affordable than traditional 4-year colleges and universities.
 
Even if community college is cheaper than traditional 4-year schools, tuition is still a major expense. Many students take out loans to finance their education but they are still left with the cost of books, supplies, and fees. If you are struggling to pay your community college expenses, you will be glad to know that there are some options out there that don’t involve taking out more loans.
 
Money-Saving Tips Before Enrollment
 
To ensure that you save as much as possible on community college tuition, there are a few things you can do while you are still in high school. For one thing, you should take full advantage of any opportunities you have during high school to earn college credits – this may include taking Advanced Placement classes so you can skip low level college courses. You should also keep an eye out for scholarship opportunities. Many charitable organizations offer scholarships that can help you save money for college even if you don’t qualify for need-based aid. Talk to your school counsellor to see
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Updated March 26, 2015
Is President Obama's Plan for Free Community College Right for America?
President Obama recently introduced a plan to deliver free Community College tuition to all Americans across the country. Is it the right call? In this story, we will not attempt to make a judgment call on whether free Community College is right or wrong for the United States. Instead, we paneled a few experts in education and economics to get their take on the issue. We’re showing both sides of the coin, and letting readers decide on their own.
Last week, President Obama introduced a plan to deliver free Community College tuition to all Americans across the country. Is it the right call?
 
In this story, we will not attempt to make a judgment call on whether free Community College is right or wrong for the United States. Instead, we paneled a few experts in education and economics to get their take on the issue. We’re showing both sides of the coin, and letting readers decide on their own.
 
The Case for Free Community College
 
Democratization of Higher Education
 
The biggest supporters of Obama’s plan laud the proposal as a right step in the right direction toward a more equal democracy. One such organization, University of the People, offers tuition-free degrees to many students who would have been shut out of the opportunity to attend college otherwise. Founder and President, Shai Reshef says, “According to the proposed plan, students could save an average of $3,800 a year. It is known that the average student spends as much as $1,200 each year on textbooks and supplies alone.”
 
Rasheen Carbin, Co-founder and CMO of career app nsphire, says Obama’s plan is the right step for America. “As we all know, the price of college has skyrocketed. We also know, having a Bachelor’s degree adds about a million dollars to your lifetime earnings.” Rasheen is adamant that free community college can lift a burden on lower-income families, and close the gap between poor and wealthy classes in the U.S.
 
“College is still a very elite
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Updated March 03, 2015 |
Learn about proposals to freeze community college tuition that would make the cost of college attendance much more affordable.
The cost of a college education has risen rapidly over the last three decades. In fact, according to the Bloomberg Report, the overall cost of a college degree has risen a whopping 1,120 percent since 1978. This rate of increase is nearly double that of medical care costs and has outpaced housing costs by threefold. The exorbitant cost of college has many people concerned that higher education is beyond their means, and rightfully so. As a result, many politicians in Washington, D.C., as well as state-level officials, are examining ways they can help curb the exponential growth of college costs in order to make higher education more affordable for more people.
Source: Bloomberg
 
Ohio Plans to Freeze Tuition
 
For those for whom college is too expensive, some states have launched plans to freeze tuition. In Ohio, House Bill 484 seeks to hold tuition rates steady while students complete their degrees. The guaranteed tuition rate would be good for a specified period of time, most often two or three years. The cost of tuition a student pays in their first year of study would remain constant over his or her tenure at the school, making their college studies more affordable and increasing the likelihood that they will stay in school and graduate.
 
Supporters of House Bill 484 maintain that the program will encourage more first-time students to enter college and obtain a degree. Additionally, they argue that more students will enroll full-time, thus shortening the
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Updated March 03, 2015 |
Free Tuition Could Come to a Community College Near You
To encourage students to pursue higher education, some states are considering plans to offer zero-tuition programs at public community colleges. These programs could make college a reality for many young people, however, critics argue such programs would cost taxpayers a significant amount of money.
It’s no secret that Americans are lagging behind other industrialized nations in terms of attaining a post-secondary degree. Losing the brain battle is concerning in and of itself, however, many politicians are also concerned about a workforce that may not have the necessary knowledge and skills to compete in the global market. To address this issue, legislators in some states are proposing plans that would make tuition at public community colleges free for all students, regardless of income.
 
Advantages of Zero-Tuition Programs
 
Clearly, free tuition makes college much more affordable for students. At a time when college tuition costs are higher than ever, being able to take advantage of such savings could encourage untold numbers of college hopefuls to enroll in classes at their local community college. Of course, with a college education comes improved knowledge, an expanded skillset, and better marketability for jobs.
 
Additionally, getting young people to go to college is a means to reverse the trend of income inequality in this country. With more and more of the nation’s wealth concentrated in the hands of a few, getting a college degree can help improve the economic situation of millions of young people that are the future of this country’s workforce. The better educated they are and the more skills they have, the more in-demand they will be and the more money they will make. As a result, upward mobility becomes much easier and the middle class expands.
Furthermore, providing a tuition-free
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Updated May 31, 2016 |
New “Pay it Forward” Plan will Allow Students to Attend Community College Tuition-Free
We explore an innovative idea coming to Oregon community colleges that will allow students to attend school tuition-free, with an agreement to pay back the state with a portion of their income after graduation.
As federal lawmakers appear unable to make progress in the student debt crisis, state lawmakers in Oregon are moving ahead with a plan to make higher education more affordable and debt-free. The proposal, known as “Pay it Forward, Pay it Back,” is a unique approach to footing the climbing bill of postsecondary education today. The bill has been approved by the state legislature and is expected to be signed into law by Oregon Governor John Kitzhaber later this month.
 
What is Pay it Forward, Pay it Back?
 
According to the website for the Oregon Working Families Party, this new piece of legislation, officially dubbed House Bill 3472, offers access to a higher education without the accumulation of large amounts of debt. Students attending public universities and community colleges would be able to do so without paying any tuition up front. After the student leaves the college or university and enters the workforce, these students would pay a percentage of their income directly to the state’s higher education funding.
 
Under the current proposal, students graduating from a four-year public school would pay 3 percent of their income. Those graduating from a community college would pay 1.5 percent of their income. Payments would be deducted directly from the individual’s payroll, much like social security taxes. The payments would increase or decrease according to the individual’s income amount, and would continue for a full 24 years.
 
Pay it Forward, Pay it Back was the brainchild of a group of students at Portland State University,
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