Improving Your Job Search

Whether you have just enrolled in community college or you’re ready to graduate and enter the job market, our articles can help improve your opportunities of landing the perfect job. Internships and apprenticeships offer lots of benefits, find out how participation in these programs can move your resume to the top of the pile. Analyze employment data for community college graduates and determine who is getting hired. Get valuable tips on polishing your candidacy and making the most of job fairs.
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Updated November 08, 2016 |
Getting into Law School with a Community College Degree
You don't have to be a pre-law major to get into law school, but how will your application be impacted by your community college degree?

Community college appeals to people from all walks of life for a number of different reasons. For some, community college offers a degree of flexibility that can’t be had at some colleges and universities and, for others, it is a way to save money on tuition. But will your graduation from a community college as opposed to a traditional college or university hurt your chances of success in pursuing a career in certain fields? Keep reading to learn some valuable tips for applying to law school with a community college degree.

When Should You Apply to Law School?

Many students who have been successfully admitted into law school agree that applying early is always best. Many law schools accept applications on a rolling bases, releasing their decisions over the course of several months. While applying early will not guarantee your admission, applying closer to the deadline means that there may be fewer spaces left to fill which could hurt your chances forgetting in. Keep in mind that most schools will not even begin to review your application until they have received all of the necessary documents so be proactive about making your requests for recommendations and with writing your essays. Take the LSAT as soon as you can without compromising your score – if you are fully prepared, take the test at the first available sitting. You should also keep in mind that even if you do not get accepted during the first round of admissions, there may still be hope.

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Updated October 10, 2016 |
Do You Need to Pick a Major Before Starting Community College?
Picking a major is a big decision. You shouldn't rush, but there are benefits to making your choice early. Keep reading to receive tips for choosing a major.

When you set foot on a college campus for the first time and start to meet other students, the question you are most likely to be asked first is, “What’s your major?” For some, this question rears its ugly head even earlier, during high school before you even decide where (or if) you are going to college. Choosing a major is a big decision and one that will have a serious impact on the rest of your life. This being the case, it is not something you should take lightly.

But just how important is it to pick a major before you start college? Or can you wait until you have a few classes under your belt to see what you really like? If you are still undecided, it isn’t the end of the world – you can still graduate with the major of your choice and enter the “real world” in your chosen field. Keep reading to learn more about which majors offer the best chances for success and to receive tips for choosing a major that suits your interests.

What Exactly is a Major?

A college major is simply a specialized area of study. When you choose a major, you are choosing the direction of your academic career. In addition to taking any general education requirements your school might have, you will also be taking classes that are relevant to your major. Most community colleges and traditional universities offer a wide variety of different majors, though many schools specialize in

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Updated August 26, 2016 |
Employment Up for Community College Graduates
We examine a new report at USA Today that shows employment rates for community college graduates have skyrocketed - and which of the fields where a community college degree is particularly helpful.
Historically, a four-year degree was the recommendation for those who wanted to find gainful employment directly after graduation. However, that tide appears to be changing, as more employers are looking to community colleges to provide the qualified workforce they require. With less time to earn a degree and less debt once the college experience is over, many students have been turning to community college as a means of gaining a higher education that leads to a lucrative career. Now, statistics from the Labor Department appear to support that choice, showing that jobs after graduation from community college also appear to be on the rise.
 
What the Numbers Show
 
According to USA Today, the latest numbers from the Labor Department show a rise in employment for those with an associate degree – up 578,000 over the past six months. This brings the grand total of employed Americans with an associate degree to around 35.2 million. During the same time period, employment growth for those with a bachelor degree increased 314,000, bringing the grand total of employed Americans with a four-year degree to 46.5 million. Although more four-year graduates are still found in the workforce, the significant increase in workers with an associate degree suggests a distinct trend toward a two-year degree to increase competitiveness in today’s workforce.
 
These numbers are particularly interesting in light of the recent recession, which saw employment for those with a high school diploma plummet, while workers with a minimum of a four-year degree remained
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Published October 27, 2010 |
Dressed for Future Success? Community College Dress Codes
Should students be free to fully express themselves through their wardrobe? Some community colleges think that dress codes are in order, ranging from uniforms to even business-appropriate attire.
Once thought of as traditional and old-fashioned, dress codes and school uniforms have become a center of focus for many schools once again. Some school administrators assert that maintaining a standard of dress is essential to level the playing field for students of all income levels and backgrounds, as well as to promote a clean, safe campus. The movement to stricter dress codes is no longer stopping at the secondary level. Today, some community colleges are even hopping aboard the dress code bandwagon too!  

Why Enforce Dress Codes?
 
The Clearinghouse on Educational Policy and Management from the University of Oregon states that the implementation of dress codes or school uniforms has been linked to a variety of benefits, including:
 
       ·        Safer schools overall
 
       ·        Enhanced learning environment
 
       ·        Higher student self esteem
 
       ·        Less pressure on parents

A strict dress code has been found to minimize violence in schools, particularly when it comes to gang-style clothing.  In addition, by eliminating expensive trendy clothing, the number of students robbed of shoes, hats, and jackets can be reduced.  Of course, when students feel safer on their school campus, learning is also enhanced.
 
Community College Dress Codes
 
In addition to many of the benefits listed above, community college students who must adhere to a relatively strict dress code receive training in how to dress for the professional world and beyond. Many community college administrators take their job of vocational training very seriously, and they believe appearance is an important component in that training if their
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Published June 17, 2010 |
Learn about the job conditions facing community college graduates in 2010.
Many who have found themselves out of work thanks to the recent recession have headed back to school for retraining in a more lucrative profession – or so they thought. It turns out that many of those so-called hot industries highly touted during the slowdown are only lukewarm at best for many of the college grads trying to hunt down the openings.

We have the report on the real state of the job market, as well as some tips that could put you at the forefront during your own job search.
 
The Hot Market Illusion
 
Check out any news publication today, and you will find at least one article about the hottest markets that are currently hiring. Case in point: A piece on the New Year's Day edition of Good Morning America this year listed four hot markets for college graduates to consider. The industries included health care, law enforcement, business services and sales.
 
A recent article on CareerBuilder.com lists companies that will be hiring college graduates this summer. Some of those companies do fall into the industries listed by Good Morning America earlier this year. However, finding a company or industry that is hiring, and landing a good job right out of college are too different things, thanks to the many complexities of a dragging economy that hasn't pulled itself out of the unemployment slump just yet.
 
Factors Affecting Hiring
 
The truth is that it is simply hard to predict where the jobs will arise because there are many
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