Courses in College

Be inspired by the gamut of community college courses, from the arts to technical training. This section will cover everything from remedial classes to continuing education. Community colleges offer courses for youth and teens, individuals looking for a new hobby or skill, or those behind bars looking for a second chance.
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Is your voice an instrument? Whether you are interested in singing professionally or for pleasure, your local community college may be the perfect venue for fine tuning your vocal skills.  
  
While many community colleges provide students with music classes, some campuses have added depth to their curriculum by offering classes that specifically focus on the art of singing. Consider adding a singing course as an elective or even declaring singing as your major, which could help you ultimately earn an associate’s degree of applied arts or sciences. 
 
Pursuing a Choral Career in Community College
 
Certain community college campuses are conducive to helping you pursue a lifelong career in singing. For example, Edmunds Community College, located in Lynwood, Washington provides musical opportunities that can prepare you for a career in song. In addition to classes focusing on the foundations of music theory and instrumental performances, the vocally-inclined can further fine tune their singing skills by enrolling in one of three voice courses.
 
The first singing course at ECC is designed to guide students through the intermediate concepts of singing and voice control. Focus areas include, “breath control, tone quality, diction, range, and stage deportment.” Upon completing this first course, students can move to the second voice class, wherein students learn to continually perfect their singing skills through both individualized and group instruction.
 
As students continue to advance their skills, interested individuals can explore various mediums of music and singing, as offered in ECC’s “Soundsation” class. In “Soundsation,” students engage in an advanced and focused study of various elements of . . . read more

Are you interested in a new hobby that will open the mysteries of the sea? Are you hoping to enrich your college experience with a unique and entertaining course? Whether you’re interested in learning to scuba dive for recreational or educational reasons, community colleges across the country are qualified to provide students with the necessary skills, training, and practice to become a certified diver.  These courses are generally open for both registered students, as well as adult community members pursuing continuing education.
 
Indeed, scuba diving courses can be a fun and engaging opportunity to explore new underwater worlds!

How to Get Certified to Scuba Dive

Scuba divers must first obtain a certification card to prove their completion of a reputable training course. The most common certification agencies are PADI, NAUI, YMCA, SSI, as well as other local institutions. Oftentimes, community college campuses provide certification courses through one of these leading agencies. 
 
When enrolling in a scuba training class, the most common certification venue is known as an “open water” scuba class. Once you complete this type of primary scuba course, you will need to pass all the tests and required dives before receiving official certification. Upon earning a certification card, a scuba diver never needs to re-enroll for training, but once this step is completed, you can maintain your certification status for life! 
 
Most scuba courses require that all participants ensure they are in healthy physical shape. Participants should be able to swim at least 200 yards and float or tread water for at least 10 minutes without stopping Adding . . . read more

Could being married help you earn better grades in college?  Interestingly, studies have found that students who are married generally report higher grades and grade point averages. 
 
According to the Research in Higher Education Journal, a study of college students “confirms earlier work regarding the positive influence of marriage on the scholastic achievement of community college students.”   The study also found that married students tended to excel most significantly in programs such as Business Administration, Executive Secretarial, and Nursing Education
 
While the causation relationship between marriage and good grades still remains unclear, community colleges are not wasting any time in helping their students benefit from the positive correlation! Many college campuses offer marital workshops and classes that help improve relationships, while other courses delve into the sociological underpinnings of marriage in our society. 
 
Community Colleges Workshops that Foster Stronger Marriages
 
Through workshops and lectures, many community colleges specifically cater to students who are currently or planning to be married.  For example, at Arapahoe Community College in Littleton, Colorado, couples can take a variety of non-credit workshops, such as “Before You Say ‘I do’  Marriage Education for Engaged Couples, "Four Hours to a Happier Relationship," "Is Anyone Listening to Me? Solving Communication Problems in Relationships,” and “Preparing for Your Empty Nest Marriage: Now That the Kids are Leaving.”  Through these workshops, students learn about how to strengthen their relationships – and potentially even their grades in school!   
 
On a broader basis, The National Healthy Marriage Resource Center (NHMR) is an . . . read more

Although most parents wish for manuals, young infants and children simply do not come with instruction manuals. Fortunately, community colleges across the country offer excellent parenting classes to help parents stimulate a child's development and behavioral growth. 
 
As all child development experts will support, the role of a parent in a child's earliest and most formative years is absolutely imperative; pro-actively seeking the best philosophies and strategies for optimal child rearing can help both parents and children experience greater feelings of satisfaction and care.

To find out how your local community college parenting classes can help you and your family, consider some of the most popular and widely available opportunities at campuses nationwide.

Mt. San Jacinto Community College
(MSJCC), California Campuses

As the San Diego News Network reports, Mt. San Jacinto Community College has gained a great deal of positive attention for its innovative parenting classes. Through cooperating Mt. San Jacinto-area campuses, participants enjoy completely free classes and resources for improved parent-child relationships and child development. Throughout the six week course, participants will engage in sessions focusing on issues such as "From Power Struggles to Encouragement," "Challenges in Discipline," as well as other topics of exploration.
 
Led by parenting expert and author, Sandi Schwartz provides parents with information based on her research and four decades of experience. Schwartz believes that actively seeking solutions to parent-child issues early in the relationship is imperative, as effectively communicating and bonding with one's child within the first five years of life can result . . . read more

While some community colleges are cutting costs by boosting tuition rates or reducing instructor positions, other campuses have found an alternative approach. In lieu of sacrificing community college resources, some schools are implementing summer programs that are only four days long.
 
Leaders of these programs assert that by closing the school one day early each week, the school will be able to save on common costs, such as electricity, water, air conditioning, security, and additional day-to-day expenses. 
 
This new approach, however, is not taking effect without ruffling a few feathers. Opponents to this plan argue that both students and faculty will be overwhelmed with longer work hours that are crammed into a shorter time period. While leaders have not yet found the perfect solution, many community college students are awaiting the reports and results of these proposed schedule changes.
 
The Four Day School Week
 
Community colleges have been inspired by how the corporate world has minimized their expenses in the face of a recession. To strengthen their bottom lines, many companies have offered their employees with the option to work from home or work four days instead of the standard five. By allowing employees to complete their work in just four days, companies have discovered that their facility costs have dropped, while employees have also benefitted from saving money on fuel. This approach, however, does not leave all participants with a happy smile. 
 
As the News and Observer reveals, Durham Technical Community College (DTCC), located in North Carolina, is one of the schools implementing the . . . read more
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Recent Articles
Freshman Year in College Looks More and More Like High School
Freshman Year in College Looks More and More Like High School
Nearly 52 percent of community college students in the United States begin their freshman year in at least one remedial class. These courses, which help students acquire knowledge and skills they should have acquired in high school, do not count toward their degree requirements. As a result, students are taking longer than ever to obtain their degree, if they obtain one at all.
Federal Student Loans – Unavailable at 20% of Community Colleges
Although a community college education is inexpensive when compared to tuition and fees at a four-year institution, some students still need financial assistance to pay their education bills. Yet, some community colleges don’t participate in the federal student loan program, putting some students in a financial bind.
Post-Recession Cliff Looms for Community Colleges
While many factors have contributed to the current decline in community college enrollment, the recovering economy is chief among them. As more and more people return to the workforce, fewer students enroll in courses at community colleges. Many institutions must now deal with budget shortfalls in the face of double-digit declines in enrollment.
Courses in College

Remedial Education

60% of community college students need remedial courses. This section covers the classes and new developments to help students who need remedial coursework. Learn why the gap exists, how schools are combatting it and what you can do to avoid remedial classes. Get tips on mastering college math, learn what you can do to prevent repeating a class and hear what the experts have to say about remedial class placement.

Kids and Teens

Community college is not just for adults. Learn about all the programs available to children and teens too. From aiding high school dropouts to ramped up summer school programs, community colleges work hard to encourage the pursuit of higher education to students of all ages.

Online Courses

Online classes give you the flexibility to learn off-campus, often at times most convenient for your schedule. Identify 10 degrees you can earn online, weigh the pros and cons of online education and find out how you can take online classes for free.

Class Schedules

Setting your class schedule with community colleges gives you flexibility and many options.

Support for Businesses

Local business are taking advantage of special training programs at community colleges. From OSHA training to a collaboration with Goldman Sachs, community colleges are training employees for small and large businesses across the country.

Fun & Elective Classes

Community colleges offer a gamut of fun and interesting classes, and we give ideas that may strike inspiration for your elective choices. Learn homesteading skills, study paranormal investigating, or earn a scuba diving certificate all at a community college near you. This sections identifies some of the fun non-credit courses available at your local campus.

Continuing Education

Community colleges are filled with continuing education opportunities. Whether you are looking for a resume booster, new skills to earn a promotion or want to earn your degree while incarcerated, community college may be a good choice for you.