Courses in College

Be inspired by the gamut of community college courses, from the arts to technical training. This section will cover everything from remedial classes to continuing education. Community colleges offer courses for youth and teens, individuals looking for a new hobby or skill, or those behind bars looking for a second chance.
View the most popular articles in Courses in College:
As more students flock to community colleges today, the institutions are staying ahead of rising enrollment with creativity and flexibility. The newest offering at many community colleges across the country is early class times that allow for additional course offerings, as well as work around professional students' busy schedules.
 
However, do classes before dawn really make the grade? We looked at three different community colleges with early course offerings to find the answer. 
 
"Early Bird" Classes at Gateway
 
Gateway Community College in Connecticut is just one of the many colleges opening up their campuses for early birds. According to a report in the Hartford Courant, Gateway will begin offering its first set of "early bird classes" during its fall semester. The courses will begin at 6:30 in the morning, which will let out by 8 a.m., giving you plenty of time to make it to your day job.
 
"If you work the average day shift, this could be a simple way to get a class done before you go to work," Dean of Academic Affairs Mark Kosinski states on the college's website. Kosinski also told the Courant, "We are constantly looking for new ways to meet the needs of our diverse student body so we'll be looking closely at the results of this pilot to see whether it should be expanded beyond the fall semester."
 
In addition to adding flexible scheduling for professional students who are earning degrees while working full-time, the earlier schedules will provide more courses for . . . read more

Most business owners understand that top-notch employee training offers the necessary edge in a competitive market. However, finding the time, money and resources for such training is often out of the grasp of many small companies today.

The good news is that you can get your employees the training they need – sometimes at no cost to you! Community colleges have risen to the call of training the workforce in a variety of skills and industries.
 
Brush Up on Technical Skills at Brookdale
 
For business owners who want to help their staffs refine their computer skills, Brookdale Community College in New Jersey has an affordable solution. The college is offering a variety of course options, beginning now and running through the end of the year, according to a report in Asbury Park Press. The program is funded by a state Department of Labor and Business industry grant, so employees can reap the benefits of the additional training at no cost to them.
 
According to Brookdale Community College, classes offered can benefit employees in the following ways:
 
       ·         Help them achieve greater accuracy in technical jobs
 
       ·         Help them manage staff and workloads more efficiently
 
       ·         Show them how to develop business and serve current customers better

Classes include instruction in MS Excel, MS Word and the basics of navigating Windows. Employers can also find training options in math and measurement, communications, and English as a second language. Courses are offered at the six different Brookdale campuses, or employers can schedule classes right at . . . read more

As students head into the summer vacation mode, many parents are wondering how to keep those busy minds and hands busy as the summer months begin to stretch on. One solution is to send your kids to college for the summer!  
 
More and more community colleges across the country are opening their doors to middle school and high school students for summer enrichment programs. These classes provide the opportunity for students to continue learning throughout summer vacation in a fun, low-stress environment that promotes hands-on learning and smaller class sizes for the greatest benefit.
 
The Benefits of Summer Learning
 
There are many reasons to consider community college enrichment programs for your middle schooler this summer. According to Public School Review, some of the advantages of summer classes include:

 

  • Programs that emphasize academic instruction provide students with the opportunity to enhance their cognitive skills.
  • Any type of summer enrichment program can improve students' social skills and provide opportunity for personal growth.
  • Summer programs encourage routine during the summer months and encourage physical activity, which may help prevent behavioral issues and emotional downfalls.

 

There are many opportunities for summer enrichment today, but allowing kids to visit a community college campus offers additional advantages as well. Children get to experience a college environment firsthand, which may encourage them to pursue a higher education after high school
 
Luisa Bascur, director of work force and economic development at Ivy Tech Community College in Michigan, told the News and Tribune, "We think there is a need . . . read more

Looking for a way to get a college education at little or no cost? So is the current administration!
 
Last year, President Obama created a plan for community colleges that included a $500 million budget to create free online courses that could be tailored to the specific needs of students. According to Inside Higher Ed, the proposal was part of a larger plan to beef up community college services and access, preparing more Americans for practical job opportunities in the current workforce.
 
Plan Specifics
 
In addition to helping high schools come up with low-cost curriculum, the original proposal coming out of the White House offered federal funding to help community colleges develop courses that students could take absolutely free. The $500 million originally offered would be used to both create curriculum and ways to assess student performance in the courses. The efforts would be coordinated under a "National Skills College."
 
Many community colleges supported the efforts, even as they were making the move to put more and more courses online. An online curriculum makes sense to many community college students who are trying to structure their education around a professional job and family responsibilities. In light of the fact that many community college students have limited resources to spend on education, the free courses make even more sense on this level. Some college officials are even hopeful that free online courses would inspire other organizations to set up laptop programs to make computers available to low-income students.
 
Unfortunately, the Obama plan . . . read more

While Goldman Sachs has found itself in plenty of hot investigative water recently, the investment bank has also contributed significantly to the development of small businesses via community colleges. Last year, Goldman Sachs announced the launch of 10,000 Small Business, a multi-million dollar initiative geared toward the creation and growth of small businesses across the country.

An Associated Press report published on Diverse Issues in Higher Education last November stated that Goldman Sachs is teaming up with billionaire Warren Buffett to provide $5 million to support small business owners in a variety of ways. Of that amount, $3 million will go to increasing opportunities for financial capital, while $2 million will be earmarked for education and training. The advisory council for the 10,000 Small Businesses initiative will be co-chaired by Buffett, Goldman Sachs CEO Lloyd Blankfein and Harvard Business School Professor Michael Porter.
 
Overcoming Obstacles
 
According to the Goldman Sachs website, Goldman Sachs is partnering with Warren Buffett, the Initiative for a Competitive Inner City and Community College Associations to provide for three factors that have been identified as the primary barriers to the growth of small business in the United States:

  • Access to Financial Capital – Goldman Sachs will invest $300 million in a combination of lending and donations to Community Development Financial Institutions to increase the amount of growth capital available to small businesses.
  • Business Education – Additional education and training will be available to business owners through a partnership between Goldman Sachs, local community colleges, universities and other educational institutions . . . read more
View Pages:<<Prev  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9  Next>>
Recent Articles
Freshman Year in College Looks More and More Like High School
Freshman Year in College Looks More and More Like High School
Nearly 52 percent of community college students in the United States begin their freshman year in at least one remedial class. These courses, which help students acquire knowledge and skills they should have acquired in high school, do not count toward their degree requirements. As a result, students are taking longer than ever to obtain their degree, if they obtain one at all.
Federal Student Loans – Unavailable at 20% of Community Colleges
Although a community college education is inexpensive when compared to tuition and fees at a four-year institution, some students still need financial assistance to pay their education bills. Yet, some community colleges don’t participate in the federal student loan program, putting some students in a financial bind.
Post-Recession Cliff Looms for Community Colleges
While many factors have contributed to the current decline in community college enrollment, the recovering economy is chief among them. As more and more people return to the workforce, fewer students enroll in courses at community colleges. Many institutions must now deal with budget shortfalls in the face of double-digit declines in enrollment.
Courses in College

Remedial Education

60% of community college students need remedial courses. This section covers the classes and new developments to help students who need remedial coursework. Learn why the gap exists, how schools are combatting it and what you can do to avoid remedial classes. Get tips on mastering college math, learn what you can do to prevent repeating a class and hear what the experts have to say about remedial class placement.

Kids and Teens

Community college is not just for adults. Learn about all the programs available to children and teens too. From aiding high school dropouts to ramped up summer school programs, community colleges work hard to encourage the pursuit of higher education to students of all ages.

Online Courses

Online classes give you the flexibility to learn off-campus, often at times most convenient for your schedule. Identify 10 degrees you can earn online, weigh the pros and cons of online education and find out how you can take online classes for free.

Class Schedules

Setting your class schedule with community colleges gives you flexibility and many options.

Support for Businesses

Local business are taking advantage of special training programs at community colleges. From OSHA training to a collaboration with Goldman Sachs, community colleges are training employees for small and large businesses across the country.

Fun & Elective Classes

Community colleges offer a gamut of fun and interesting classes, and we give ideas that may strike inspiration for your elective choices. Learn homesteading skills, study paranormal investigating, or earn a scuba diving certificate all at a community college near you. This sections identifies some of the fun non-credit courses available at your local campus.

Continuing Education

Community colleges are filled with continuing education opportunities. Whether you are looking for a resume booster, new skills to earn a promotion or want to earn your degree while incarcerated, community college may be a good choice for you.