Courses in College

Be inspired by the gamut of community college courses, from the arts to technical training. This section will cover everything from remedial classes to continuing education. Community colleges offer courses for youth and teens, individuals looking for a new hobby or skill, or those behind bars looking for a second chance.
View the most popular articles in Courses in College:
Homesteading began in this country with the Homestead Act that was signed into law by President Lincoln in 1862. According to this legislation, people were allowed to obtain free land in exchange for the development of a homestead farm within a set time frame. If they successfully started their farm, the land it sat upon was theirs to keep.

Although homesteading laws are no longer in effect throughout most of Canada and the United States, the idea of homesteading appears to be catching on once again. We will take a look at the new definition of homesteading and visit some community colleges that are teaching students how to successfully adopt this way of life.
 
Today's Homesteading
 
While homesteading in the 19th century was about staking your claim to a piece of land, today's definition is more about finding self sufficiency in a simpler way of life. According to Modern Homesteading Today, modern homesteaders grow their own food, make their own clothing and even supply their own electricity to their homes through solar or wind power. Homesteading allows individuals to abandon the break-neck speed lifestyles common today, in favor of a simpler life living off the land and growing together as a family.
 
Homesteading can be done in any area of the country, including the heart of big cities. In fact, urban homesteading has become a popular concept, as more city dwellers learn to live self sufficiently as much as possible, despite their bustling surroundings.

Other homesteaders find that living on acreage is an . . . read more

Community colleges have always been safe havens where struggling students can bring themselves up to academic par before transferring to a four-year university. In some cases, this might mean repeating a course a number of times before getting the required grade to advance to the next level. However, budget constrictions are impacting repeat classes for students across the country, with some left wondering how they will complete their community college program. We will take a look at both sides of this issue to find out how institutions are struggling to balance their commitment to student achievement with their bottom line.
 
California Setting Limits
 
California is one of the first to look into setting limits on repeat courses at community colleges across the state. According to a report at Inside Higher Ed, the California Community Colleges Chancellor's Office is looking into the feasibility of limiting the number of times students can repeat courses within their college system. Currently, a small number of California community college students may repeat a class as many as five times or more during their college career.
 
A spokesman for the chancellor's office, Terri Carbaugh, told Inside Higher Ed that the office was looking into the feasibility of a regulation limiting the number of times students can retake courses to save taxpayer dollars. The office would like to set a limit of four retakes, and then community colleges would have to find their own source of funding for additional classes – without using any taxpayer . . . read more

It all started when Lane Community College in Oregon decided to offer a non-credit course titled, "What is Islam?" The instructor of the course, Barry Sommer, had submitted an application to teach a class in Islam for the community college, which the college accepted. However, before the course had a single sign-up, the college put the brakes on the offering. Apparently, officials of the school learned some potentially disturbing facts about Sommer and decided it was best to nip the brewing controversy in the bud.

The Facts
 
Eugene resident Barry Sommer submitted an application in October of this year to teach a class on Islam at Lane Community College. The school typically offers non-credit courses for interested students throughout the year, and many of these are taught by qualified residents of the community, rather than college professors. According to a report at World Net Daily, approval for the course came, and Sommer began preparations for teaching. When the course went online on the college website, Sommer also sent out a press release to alert others to his offering.
 
Once the details were announced, a local news station asked to interview Sommer. As the course became more public, so did Sommer's background. It turns out the Sommer may have been involved in organizations that were perceived as anti-Islamic. Once the news spread that Sommer was a potential controversial figure in the Islamic community, Lane pulled the plug on the course.
 
More about Sommer
 
According to a report at the Register Guard, Sommer . . . read more

Community colleges have always been at the forefront of training students for both traditional and innovative careers...and ghost-busting is no exception!  Indeed, a handful of community colleges are actually offering paranormal studies to train students in the interesting field of ghost-busting.   
 
Be spooked or inspired by the paranormal studies available at the following community colleges. Could researching ghosts be the right career choice for you?
 
 
This Indiana institution is known for many strong fields of study, but recently, the college added paranormal investigation courses to its catalogue. These courses, according to the Kokomo Perspective, are designed to explore the world of paranormal behavior in a way never seen before.
 
The teacher of the course, Al Taylor, is the PR director of Indiana Ghost Trackers. Taylor will lead students on an exploration of paranormal research that will include conduct and safety, as well as the proper use of paranormal equipment.
 
The courses are offered at two different Ivy Tech campuses and are done in collaboration with the Kokomo Region of the Department of Workforce and Economic Development. This organization offers provides career training solutions to help fill the needs of today's employers.
 
 
In North Carolina, Almance Community College is offering its own brand of paranormal training. The school's current class in paranormal investigations has been consistently topping the list as one of the most popular course offerings at Almance.
 
The course is taught by Heather Garner of Grahan, the head of TimeStoppers Paranormal and the . . . read more

The Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, also known as OSHA, was established to ensure a safe and healthy working environment for working men and women, according to the U.S. Department of Labor website. The act is designed to provide the necessary training and education to maintain a high level of safety in a wide range of industries.
 
To work in these industries, new employees are often required to attend OSHA training prior to beginning their new job. Today, there are plenty of options in OSHA training, since community colleges across the country have stepped up to answer the call for skilled laborers who understand the importance of safety on the job.
 
Determining a Need
 
OSHA includes a specific set of training guidelines that must be applied to all businesses, from the employer down through all of the employees. The guidelines include:
  • Determining whether there is a need for training
  • Identifying training needs, goals and objectives
  • Developing learning activities and conducting training
  • Evaluating the effectiveness of the program and creating improvements when necessary
The model set forth by the U.S. Department of Labor makes it much easier for smaller companies to conduct their own training without going to the added expense of hiring professional trainers or purchasing expensive materials. However, the value from utilizing a community college program for OSHA training often makes this path the best choice for companies of all sizes.
 
Community colleges take the guesswork out of the process by providing programs customized to the specific needs of industries. Many colleges . . . read more
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A recent study reveals that job applicants with a credential or associate’s degree from a community college have slightly better chances of getting a job interview than students who attend a for-profit college or university. Since community colleges are much more budget friendly than for-profit institutions and have much better job placement results, community colleges are a much better option for employment-minded students.
Freshman Year in College Looks More and More Like High School
Nearly 52 percent of community college students in the United States begin their freshman year in at least one remedial class. These courses, which help students acquire knowledge and skills they should have acquired in high school, do not count toward their degree requirements. As a result, students are taking longer than ever to obtain their degree, if they obtain one at all.
Courses in College

Remedial Education

60% of community college students need remedial courses. This section covers the classes and new developments to help students who need remedial coursework. Learn why the gap exists, how schools are combatting it and what you can do to avoid remedial classes. Get tips on mastering college math, learn what you can do to prevent repeating a class and hear what the experts have to say about remedial class placement.

Kids and Teens

Community college is not just for adults. Learn about all the programs available to children and teens too. From aiding high school dropouts to ramped up summer school programs, community colleges work hard to encourage the pursuit of higher education to students of all ages.

Online Courses

Online classes give you the flexibility to learn off-campus, often at times most convenient for your schedule. Identify 10 degrees you can earn online, weigh the pros and cons of online education and find out how you can take online classes for free.

Class Schedules

Setting your class schedule with community colleges gives you flexibility and many options.

Support for Businesses

Local business are taking advantage of special training programs at community colleges. From OSHA training to a collaboration with Goldman Sachs, community colleges are training employees for small and large businesses across the country.

Fun & Elective Classes

Community colleges offer a gamut of fun and interesting classes, and we give ideas that may strike inspiration for your elective choices. Learn homesteading skills, study paranormal investigating, or earn a scuba diving certificate all at a community college near you. This sections identifies some of the fun non-credit courses available at your local campus.

Continuing Education

Community colleges are filled with continuing education opportunities. Whether you are looking for a resume booster, new skills to earn a promotion or want to earn your degree while incarcerated, community college may be a good choice for you.