Community College News

Stay abreast of all the news and reports impacting community colleges. This section covers the latest news stories, from campus protests to Wal-Mart partnerships. Read community college reactions to the latest State of the Union address, identify schools receiving big donations, and analyze the latest laws impacting community colleges and their students.
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The good news is that more Latinos are headed to college today, whether they set their sights on a two-year or four-year institution. The bad news is that despite their lofty goals, many Latinos won’t make it to college completion. In fact, some may face serious obstacles just getting their foot in the door of higher education. With the Hispanic population increasing across the county, it may be up to community colleges to change the tide and provide the necessary training so this growing population can reach their full earning potential.
 
First, the Good News
 
NBC Latino reports that a record number of Latino students are heading to college today. According to a recent analysis from the Pew Hispanic Research Center, seven out of every 10 Latino high school students enrolled in college in 2012. That number is higher than the rate of both white and black high school students. The dropout rate for Latino students was also cut in half – from 28 percent in 2000, to 14 percent in 2011.
 
There are a number of possible factors that could be attributed to the increase, according to the researchers that conducted the analysis. First, Latino students may be finding that heading off for more education is more productive than searching for employment in a somewhat dismal job market. Another reason could be the increasing importance the Latino community is giving to higher education overall.
 
“The wider Latino community understands the importance of education for the future of education when it comes . . . read more

Three years ago, the U.S. Labor Department began issuing grants to community colleges that were ready and willing to train up the local workforce in their areas. Those schools that successfully partnered with area businesses to target training programs to the specific needs of employers were rewarded with federal funds to help them do so. Three years later, the Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training Grant Program (TAACCCT) is still going strong, promising another $500 million to qualifying community colleges next year. What is the money being used for? Check out how community colleges are using these Labor Department grants to benefit students, colleges and the local workforce.
 
The Massachusetts Consortium Offers Variety of Options      
 
One of the federal grants has gone to a consortium of 15 community colleges across the state of Massachusetts, according to Inside Higher Ed. The $20 million in grant funding has been used to create new credentials for students and help them hone their job seeking skills to create better opportunities after graduation. To that end, each of the community colleges in the consortium now staffs a career and college navigator full time, to help students succeed in school and beyond graduation.
 
The Massachusetts program has focused on preparing students for careers in six key industries:
 
       ·      Advanced Manufacturing
       ·      Information Technology
       ·      Health Care
       ·      Financial Services
       ·      Green Energy
       ·      Biotechnology
 
While that may seem like a . . . read more

New Community College in New York has just found itself $15 million richer, thanks to a generous donation from the Stella and Charles Guttman Foundation. As one of the largest donations in community college history, the school felt a name change was in order as well. Now, New York’s newest community college will be known as the Stella and Charles Guttman Community College. In addition to the new name, the school is preparing to launch initiatives to improve graduation rates and expand their financial aid opportunities, courtesy of the foundation that is now the school’s namesake as well.
 
The Birth of a School
 
The New York Times reported in July, 2012, that New Community College was about to open its doors to its inaugural class of incoming high school graduates. The school was a new endeavor by City University of New York to bring an innovative two-year school to the Big Apple. New Community College wasted no time reaching out to the surrounding community of potential students; many of whom found the idea of higher education overwhelming and even out of reach.
 
The primary goal of New Community College was to provide relief for what ails community colleges today. CUNY designed the school structure from scratch, including a full curriculum that school officials hope will improve graduation rates and increase transfers to four-year schools. New York Community College Chancellor Matthew Goldstein stated on the CUNY website, “There is no more urgent task in higher education than to find ways . . . read more

A community college campus is typically filled with adults of all ages, books and backpacks in hand, moving from class to class. However, some community college campuses are adding a more youthful flavor to their ivied halls, with programs of all kinds designed for the younger set. Check out these innovative ways community colleges are giving younger students a taste of campus life, with special programs created just for them.
 
Science Olympiad Attracts Young Scientists
 
Mott Community College becomes a hot spot for young scientists every year, when it hosts its annual Region V Science Olympiad. According to mLive, the event attracts middle and high school students from Livingston, Lapeer, Genesee and Shiawassee. Students compete in a variety of events constructing machines, flying helicopters and designing robotics.
 
High school students participate during morning events, and middle schoolers compete in the afternoon session. Many of the events are open to the public, and the event draws a crowd of parents, teachers and interested community members. Students who come out on top in their events will advance to the state tournament of the Science Olympiad. The statewide event is to be held later this spring at Michigan University. There is also a national competition for those who do well in the state contests, which takes place at Wright State University in Dayton, Ohio, in May.
 
Budding Artists Find a Venue
 
Sussex County Community College finds a very different way to attract younger students from around the county. This New Jersey schools is . . . read more

California community colleges have faced a recent cash crunch that has resulted in thousands of students ending up on wait lists rather than in classes. A new study reveals that many of those students could find classroom space if the two-year colleges in the state were willing to coordinate at least a portion of their administrative staffs. The savings would not be insignificant, according to the recent analysis – in fact, tens of millions could be allocated for classroom resources by making consolidation decisions in college districts across California.
 
Analysis Offers Insight into Spending Patterns
 
The analysis was conducted by California Watch, a nonpartisan, investigative reporting center that performs a wide range of investigative reporting for the state. The group specializes in fields like public health, environment and education. According to the California Watch website, the award-winning team is supported by grants from a number of organizations, including the James Irvine Foundation and The California Endowment.
 
To complete this analysis, members of California Watch dug deep into the bureaucracy of the California Community College system, the largest of its kind in the United States. An additional article on the group’s website explains that a data-clustering algorithm was used to group districts into clusters within a 20-mile radius of one another. Using that model, 40 districts were sectioned into six clusters.
 
The group took a closer look at 16 districts in the state, using information like payroll data, size and proximity to one another. In addition to successfully identifying the spending . . . read more
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