Support for Businesses

Local business are taking advantage of special training programs at community colleges. From OSHA training to a collaboration with Goldman Sachs, community colleges are training employees for small and large businesses across the country.
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The Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, also known as OSHA, was established to ensure a safe and healthy working environment for working men and women, according to the U.S. Department of Labor website. The act is designed to provide the necessary training and education to maintain a high level of safety in a wide range of industries.
 
To work in these industries, new employees are often required to attend OSHA training prior to beginning their new job. Today, there are plenty of options in OSHA training, since community colleges across the country have stepped up to answer the call for skilled laborers who understand the importance of safety on the job.
 
Determining a Need
 
OSHA includes a specific set of training guidelines that must be applied to all businesses, from the employer down through all of the employees. The guidelines include:
  • Determining whether there is a need for training
  • Identifying training needs, goals and objectives
  • Developing learning activities and conducting training
  • Evaluating the effectiveness of the program and creating improvements when necessary
The model set forth by the U.S. Department of Labor makes it much easier for smaller companies to conduct their own training without going to the added expense of hiring professional trainers or purchasing expensive materials. However, the value from utilizing a community college program for OSHA training often makes this path the best choice for companies of all sizes.
 
Community colleges take the guesswork out of the process by providing programs customized to the specific needs of industries. Many colleges . . . read more

Most business owners understand that top-notch employee training offers the necessary edge in a competitive market. However, finding the time, money and resources for such training is often out of the grasp of many small companies today.

The good news is that you can get your employees the training they need – sometimes at no cost to you! Community colleges have risen to the call of training the workforce in a variety of skills and industries.
 
Brush Up on Technical Skills at Brookdale
 
For business owners who want to help their staffs refine their computer skills, Brookdale Community College in New Jersey has an affordable solution. The college is offering a variety of course options, beginning now and running through the end of the year, according to a report in Asbury Park Press. The program is funded by a state Department of Labor and Business industry grant, so employees can reap the benefits of the additional training at no cost to them.
 
According to Brookdale Community College, classes offered can benefit employees in the following ways:
 
       ·         Help them achieve greater accuracy in technical jobs
 
       ·         Help them manage staff and workloads more efficiently
 
       ·         Show them how to develop business and serve current customers better

Classes include instruction in MS Excel, MS Word and the basics of navigating Windows. Employers can also find training options in math and measurement, communications, and English as a second language. Courses are offered at the six different Brookdale campuses, or employers can schedule classes right at . . . read more

While Goldman Sachs has found itself in plenty of hot investigative water recently, the investment bank has also contributed significantly to the development of small businesses via community colleges. Last year, Goldman Sachs announced the launch of 10,000 Small Business, a multi-million dollar initiative geared toward the creation and growth of small businesses across the country.

An Associated Press report published on Diverse Issues in Higher Education last November stated that Goldman Sachs is teaming up with billionaire Warren Buffett to provide $5 million to support small business owners in a variety of ways. Of that amount, $3 million will go to increasing opportunities for financial capital, while $2 million will be earmarked for education and training. The advisory council for the 10,000 Small Businesses initiative will be co-chaired by Buffett, Goldman Sachs CEO Lloyd Blankfein and Harvard Business School Professor Michael Porter.
 
Overcoming Obstacles
 
According to the Goldman Sachs website, Goldman Sachs is partnering with Warren Buffett, the Initiative for a Competitive Inner City and Community College Associations to provide for three factors that have been identified as the primary barriers to the growth of small business in the United States:

  • Access to Financial Capital – Goldman Sachs will invest $300 million in a combination of lending and donations to Community Development Financial Institutions to increase the amount of growth capital available to small businesses.
  • Business Education – Additional education and training will be available to business owners through a partnership between Goldman Sachs, local community colleges, universities and other educational institutions. . . . read more

Despite a dwindling economy, many business experts believe there is still room for entrepreneurs. In fact, individuals with striking ideas that are budget friendly may be in for luck at their local community college! 
  
If you have an idea for your own business and want to find out the secrets to entrepreneurship success, sign up at your local community college. With courses that specialize in an array of diverse fields, community colleges can help up and coming entrepreneurs refine their business concepts, set up their financial goals, and gain insight into the legal requirements of operating a company. 
 
The Benefits between Community Colleges and Business
 
As the National Association for Community College Entrepreneurship (NACCE) supports, community colleges have the opportunity to play an integral role in the economic wellness of a surrounding community. NACCE is aiming to boost the community college’s traditional role of workforce training into new and innovative forms of entrepreneurial development. 
 
As NACCE explains, with a college’s ties to its community, along with a nationwide link to fellow colleges across the country, entrepreneurial opportunities result in “Innovative ideas and programs that advance economic growth and prosperity in the communities served by the colleges.” By supporting entrepreneurs, community colleges can help stimulate job growth, economic development, and tax revenues for the local area.  
 
Community College Entrepreneur Programs  
 
While NACCE hosts a variety of workshops and courses to foster greater entrepreneurial education, individual community colleges are also working to create their own programs. As the Andover Townsman reports, Northern Essex Community College, located . . . read more
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SUPPORT FOR BUSINESSES