Class Schedules

The famous “all-nighter” has been a mainstay at colleges for generations, particular during midterms and finals weeks, when students are cramming for exams. However, some community colleges across the country are now taking this popular college term to a whole new level. Instead of poring over books and lecture notes in the privacy of their bedrooms or dormitories, students are now hitting the road – and the books – to attend community college classes in the wee hours of the night. So who attends midnight classes and what is the point of offering them?  While we reported on the midnight-class phenomenon in 2009, we’ll take a closer look at how this trend has grown even more in the last two years.

Meeting Needs – and a Growing Demand – Head-On
 
Most community colleges across the country have seen enrollments grow by exponential numbers since the economy went south and more displaced workers began showing up on campus. The higher enrollment numbers have been difficult for some schools to accommodate, particularly in light of budget cuts that have also been a byproduct of a sluggish economy. The unfortunate result has been that many community colleges are forced to turn students away – an action these schools vehemently oppose. To help alleviate the problem, some schools are turning to unconventional approaches to the college experience.
 
“They would rather do anything than turn students away,” Norma Kent, spokesperson for the American Association of Community Colleges told USA Today. “If...
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As more students flock to community colleges today, the institutions are staying ahead of rising enrollment with creativity and flexibility. The newest offering at many community colleges across the country is early class times that allow for additional course offerings, as well as work around professional students' busy schedules.
 
However, do classes before dawn really make the grade? We looked at three different community colleges with early course offerings to find the answer. 
 
"Early Bird" Classes at Gateway
 
Gateway Community College in Connecticut is just one of the many colleges opening up their campuses for early birds. According to a report in the Hartford Courant, Gateway will begin offering its first set of "early bird classes" during its fall semester. The courses will begin at 6:30 in the morning, which will let out by 8 a.m., giving you plenty of time to make it to your day job.
 
"If you work the average day shift, this could be a simple way to get a class done before you go to work," Dean of Academic Affairs Mark Kosinski states on the college's website. Kosinski also told the Courant, "We are constantly looking for new ways to meet the needs of our diverse student body so we'll be looking closely at the results of this pilot to see whether it should be expanded beyond the fall semester."
 
In addition to adding flexible scheduling for professional students who are earning degrees while working full-time, the earlier schedules will provide more courses for...
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With today’s rising community college enrollment rates, courses may no longer be scheduled between the hours of 8 am and 8 pm. To accommodate the growing demand, some community colleges have been forced to be creative with their class scheduling. In fact, some students are finding themselves attending classes at midnight!   

Midnight is the New 8 AM
 
As Diverse Issues in Higher Education reports, colleges across the country have experienced record enrollment rates for both new and returning students. As the economy forces many workers to retrain their skills, many community colleges find themselves nearly bursting at the seams. 
 
Coping with such pressures, Bunker Hill Community College, located in Boston, is setting a new example for college reform. Bunker Hill is the first college in the country to open its doors for midnight courses. According to reports, Bunker Hill has begun, “Offering two classes on the graveyard shift in a move to accommodate an unprecedented boost in enrollment attributed to the struggling economy as people look to augment their job skills without having to pay the tuition costs of more expensive schools.” 
 
With several night courses offered at the start of the 2009 semester, Bunker Hill students can enroll in classes such as Principals of Psychology or College Writing — which both run from 11:45 pm to 2:30 am throughout the semester. 
 
These new midnight options were supported by many faculty leaders, as well as students, who argued that the modern student has too many responsibilities to fit into the traditional community college...
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While some community colleges are cutting costs by boosting tuition rates or reducing instructor positions, other campuses have found an alternative approach. In lieu of sacrificing community college resources, some schools are implementing summer programs that are only four days long.
 
Leaders of these programs assert that by closing the school one day early each week, the school will be able to save on common costs, such as electricity, water, air conditioning, security, and additional day-to-day expenses. 
 
This new approach, however, is not taking effect without ruffling a few feathers. Opponents to this plan argue that both students and faculty will be overwhelmed with longer work hours that are crammed into a shorter time period. While leaders have not yet found the perfect solution, many community college students are awaiting the reports and results of these proposed schedule changes.
 
The Four Day School Week
 
Community colleges have been inspired by how the corporate world has minimized their expenses in the face of a recession. To strengthen their bottom lines, many companies have offered their employees with the option to work from home or work four days instead of the standard five. By allowing employees to complete their work in just four days, companies have discovered that their facility costs have dropped, while employees have also benefitted from saving money on fuel. This approach, however, does not leave all participants with a happy smile. 
 
As the News and Observer reveals, Durham Technical Community College (DTCC), located in North Carolina, is one of the schools implementing the...
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Courses in College

CLASS SCHEDULES