Transfer Process

Many community college students transfer to four-year institutions. Be prepared to make a swift and easy transfer with these articles. Determine the most transfer-friendly universities, learn why some 4-year schools are limiting transfer students, and get tips on ensuring your credits go with you.
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A new program sponsored by the State Bar of California’s Council on Access and Fairness is creating new partnerships between 24 California community colleges and six law schools that will create a new pathway to law school for thousands of community college students. The Community College Pathway to Law School Initiative is a “pipeline program” that will offer community college students a host of resources to help them achieve their dream of practicing law. From tutoring and mentoring services to financial aid counseling and early exposure to law-related courses, the program will increase access to law school by making the transitions from a two-year institution to a four-year institution to law school occur in a much more smooth manner.
 
Seeking to Improve Diversity
 
At the heart of the program is a desire to increase diversity in California’s law schools, which traditionally have been overwhelmingly white. For example, about 70 percent of the University of California at Davis’ Law School identifies as white. Furthermore, throughout the first decade of the 2000s, although the number of available seats in law schools throughout the country increased, the percentage of black and Mexican-American students filling those seats declined. However, not all law schools in California lack diversity. The law school at the University of California at Irvine, which opened in 2009, boasts a 45 percent minority enrollment.

 

While UC Irvine has had success in attracting minority students, the percentage of minority applicants denied admission . . . read more

A recent study shows that one out of every ten community college students lose nearly all of their credits upon transferring to a four-year institution. In fact, just 58 percent of students who being their studies at a two-year institution report having more than 90 percent of their credits transferring to a baccalaureate program at a four-year college or university. As a result, a large number of students who dream of obtaining an undergraduate degree never get one because the credits they worked so hard to obtain do not count at their new school.
 
An Uphill Battle
 
Students who begin their post-secondary education at a community college are already less likely to graduate with a bachelor’s degree than their peers who begin study at a four-year institution. This is not to say that community colleges are somehow failing their students, rather, it is most likely life events that curtail a student’s educational aspirations. Family issues, financial difficulties, or changes in job or childcare availability are just a few common issues that force community college students to put their studies on hold. Unfortunately, the already narrow likelihood that a student will get a bachelor’s degree is further diminished when they take a break from school to attend to life’s pressing issues.

 
Even when students are able to stick with it and collect enough credits to transfer, they often discover that many of their credits will not be counted at their new school . . . read more

Community college has traditionally been seen as a second-rate postsecondary education – the 13th grade, according to some high school seniors. However, numerous changes to the system and the economy have dramatically altered the ways these institutions are viewed today. Students are now using community colleges as viable stepping stones for four-year degrees or rewarding careers. Even students that have earned their baccalaureate are returning to community college to pursue practical career training. Statistics appear to be supporting the idea that community college has become an accepted mode of higher education used to help students reach their goals.

Studies Support Community College Start
 
The Cavalier Daily reports on recent findings from the National Student Clearinghouse involving four-year completion rates for community college students. The results showed the majority of students who transferred from a community college to a four-year school finished their baccalaureate degree. This negates previous concerns that community college students were less apt to succeed in their pursuit of four-year degrees.
 
According to Inside Higher Ed, the National Student Clearinghouse found that 60 percent of community college students who transferred to four-year schools earned a bachelor degree within those four years. Students that earned their associate degree prior to transfer performed even better, with 71 percent earning a four-year degree during that same time frame. Additional community college grads remained enrolled in their four-year institution after four years, indicating they were still on track for a completed degree program.
 
“It shows that community colleges have an important . . . read more

Many college students are getting their start at community colleges today, providing a cost-effective path to four-year degree program. However, the plan only works if all those credits earned at the community college successfully transfer to the four-year degree program. To ensure the transfer process works properly, students must plan in advance for the transition from one school to the next. We have 10 tips to help students make the community college transfer process as smooth as possible.

Look for Articulation Agreements
 
Articulation agreements are transfer agreements between two and four-year schools. According to The College Insider, these articulation agreements may even guarantee admission into the four-year school if students meet course and GPA requirements. When formal agreements are in place, there is no worry over which course credits will transfer and which ones won’t. The program is clearly laid out ahead of time, making the transfer process smooth sailing for students.
 
Find Your Area of Interest
 
Community college is a budget-friendly place to explore various fields of study before heading to a four-year institution. Students who use their first two years at community college to identify their major will be that much farther along when they move to the next level. At the same time, students are fulfilling undergraduate requirements at the community college, so they can move directly into their major area of study when they move to the four-year school – and the higher tuition prices.
 
Start Early
 
Students should begin the transfer process as early as . . . read more

Many community colleges across the country have transfer agreements with four-year schools, which allow students to easily transfer credits from the community college level and apply them toward a four-year degree program. Now, a whole new type of program is cropping up among two and four-year schools from coast to coast. Instead of transferring credits from community colleges to universities, schools are now allowing agreeing to reverse transfers, which allow students to take credits from their four-year institution and apply them to their community college degree.

The Reverse Transfer System is Introduced
 
While transfers to four-year schools provide clear benefits and a subsequent rise in popularity, the assurance of transferring credits from the university level to the local community college creates a more complex array of advantages. This process is a relatively new one that is just beginning to be introduced in college systems nationwide.
 
Many students who begin their college work at a community college move to a four-year institution before completing their associate degree. While credits may transfer to the four-year school, the student is left without a degree to underscore the work they put into their first college efforts. Until the bachelor’s degree is finished – which may take many more years of education – the student has little to show for his time, effort and money.
 
At the same time, community colleges are forced to report dismal completion rates – in some cases possibly affecting their ability to receive funding. However, many of these students . . . read more
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Choosing a School

TRANSFER PROCESS