Transfer Process

Many community college students transfer to four-year institutions. Be prepared to make a swift and easy transfer with these articles. Determine the most transfer-friendly universities, learn why some 4-year schools are limiting transfer students, and get tips on ensuring your credits go with you.
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Successful Transfer Students Show Community College as Viable Option
We’ll examine research that supports the success of transfer programs between community colleges and four-year schools, as well as the attraction of such an arrangement for students.
Community college has traditionally been seen as a second-rate postsecondary education – the 13th grade, according to some high school seniors. However, numerous changes to the system and the economy have dramatically altered the ways these institutions are viewed today. Students are now using community colleges as viable stepping stones for four-year degrees or rewarding careers. Even students that have earned their baccalaureate are returning to community college to pursue practical career training. Statistics appear to be supporting the idea that community college has become an accepted mode of higher education used to help students reach their goals.

Studies Support Community College Start
 
The Cavalier Daily reports on recent findings from the National Student Clearinghouse involving four-year completion rates for community college students. The results showed the majority of students who transferred from a community college to a four-year school finished their baccalaureate degree. This negates previous concerns that community college students were less apt to succeed in their pursuit of four-year degrees.
 
According to Inside Higher Ed, the National Student Clearinghouse found that 60 percent of community college students who transferred to four-year schools earned a bachelor degree within those four years. Students that earned their associate degree prior to transfer performed even better, with 71 percent earning a four-year degree during that same time frame. Additional community college grads remained enrolled in their four-year institution after four years, indicating they were still on track for a completed degree program.
 
“It shows that community colleges have an important...
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10 Tips for Successful Community College Transfers
Utilize our advice and practical tips for students interested in transferring community college credits to a four-year university.
Many college students are getting their start at community colleges today, providing a cost-effective path to four-year degree program. However, the plan only works if all those credits earned at the community college successfully transfer to the four-year degree program. To ensure the transfer process works properly, students must plan in advance for the transition from one school to the next. We have 10 tips to help students make the community college transfer process as smooth as possible.

Look for Articulation Agreements
 
Articulation agreements are transfer agreements between two and four-year schools. According to The College Insider, these articulation agreements may even guarantee admission into the four-year school if students meet course and GPA requirements. When formal agreements are in place, there is no worry over which course credits will transfer and which ones won’t. The program is clearly laid out ahead of time, making the transfer process smooth sailing for students.
 
Find Your Area of Interest
 
Community college is a budget-friendly place to explore various fields of study before heading to a four-year institution. Students who use their first two years at community college to identify their major will be that much farther along when they move to the next level. At the same time, students are fulfilling undergraduate requirements at the community college, so they can move directly into their major area of study when they move to the four-year school – and the higher tuition prices.
 
Start Early
 
Students should begin the transfer process as early as...
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Why are Universities Turning to a Reverse Transfer System?
The reverse transfer is growing exponentially in popularity. This is a more and more common new policy among many institutions to allow transfer of credits from four-year universities to community colleges. Why is it done, and who benefits from the policy?
Many community colleges across the country have transfer agreements with four-year schools, which allow students to easily transfer credits from the community college level and apply them toward a four-year degree program. Now, a whole new type of program is cropping up among two and four-year schools from coast to coast. Instead of transferring credits from community colleges to universities, schools are now allowing agreeing to reverse transfers, which allow students to take credits from their four-year institution and apply them to their community college degree.

The Reverse Transfer System is Introduced
 
While transfers to four-year schools provide clear benefits and a subsequent rise in popularity, the assurance of transferring credits from the university level to the local community college creates a more complex array of advantages. This process is a relatively new one that is just beginning to be introduced in college systems nationwide.
 
Many students who begin their college work at a community college move to a four-year institution before completing their associate degree. While credits may transfer to the four-year school, the student is left without a degree to underscore the work they put into their first college efforts. Until the bachelor’s degree is finished – which may take many more years of education – the student has little to show for his time, effort and money.
 
At the same time, community colleges are forced to report dismal completion rates – in some cases possibly affecting their ability to receive funding. However, many of these students...
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Start to Finish: Making the Most of Community College Degree Programs
As you plan your community college journey, take advantage of this start to finish guide. Learn about some of the hottest community college degree programs today, the importance of tying the degree into the current industry needs and how to plan your community college degree for preparation into a four-year degree program.
Community college has come a long way since their humble beginnings, and now two-year programs have become an effective way for many to jumpstart a new career or advance their current job to the next level. Whether you are looking for a two-year degree program that gets you into the workforce faster, or you are preparing for a four-year degree program with an eventual transfer to a university, community colleges have what you are looking for. However, before you sign on with the closest community college, check out these tips to help you make the most of your two years spent at that institution.

Choosing a Degree Program
 
The plethora of two-year degree programs is one of the primary reasons more adult students are flocking to community colleges today. These schools offer a bevy of options, from general education degrees to career-specific training in everything from renewable energy to healthcare. However, the growing number of degree choices can also make it difficult for first-year community college students to settle on a program that will offer them both fulfillment and sufficient career openings. It is important to research degree programs carefully before choosing a major to ensure you find the program that will be both personally rewarding and financially lucrative.
 
According to data collected by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics and reported by College Board, the top 10 degrees currently offered by community colleges in terms of job openings include:
 
       ·        Registered nurses
       ·        Nursing aids, orderlies...
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University of Minnesota to Limit Transfer Students
A recent decision by the University of Minnesota will limit the number of transfer students it will accept. How will this decision impact community college students in the area?
Photo Credit: Wikipedia Commons
In what has been called a major setback for Minnesota community college students, the University of Minnesota has formally announced plans to reduce the number of transfer students to the school. While the university claims that the decrease will be just a “drop in the bucket” in regards to total transfer numbers, students and community college officials are voicing their concerns over the policy change. With community college enrollment increasing nationwide, it is possible that other universities will eye the new University of Minnesota policy with interest as they grapple with their own issues regarding a rising number of transfer students.

Pulling Back the Welcome Mat
 
According to a report at TwinCities.com, the welcome mat has a history of being extended to transfer students at the University of Minnesota. In 2009, the school accepted 3,260 new transfer students, which made up nearly 40 percent of their new student population overall. However, the university plans to cut the number of transfer students they accept by roughly eight percent over the next two years – which will translate to around 300 transfer students. The university cites various reasons for their decision, including their desire to form a solid, four-year relationship with more students coming to the school. The school has also stated that fluctuating transfer numbers from year to year put a strain on university resources.
 
Another concern from some university officials is the lack of preparedness seen in some transfer students when they enroll at the four-year school. Need for...
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TRANSFER PROCESS