Education Careers

Start your teaching career quickly and affordably with community college training. Here we’ll cover early education training standards, teacher certifications and specialty certifications. If you are interested in working with young children, special needs children, or kids with disabilities, this is the place to start.
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Dr. Maria Montessori, founder of the Montessori model of education, believed that the first three years of a child's life are critical to emotional and mental development.  Alas, until recently, those who were given the responsibility of caring for and educating these youngsters were primarily untrained and underpaid. Fortunately, the tide appears to be changing on training early childhood educators, and community colleges are at the forefront of the new trend. We will take a look at how early training impacts children and what community colleges are doing to raise a new generation of early childhood educators equipped to answer the call.

The Importance of Early Childhood Education
 
According to a report in Community College Week, more research continues to surface regarding the importance of the years from birth to age three. This developmental time is when a child's brain begins making connections to his outer world. This age group has been historically dubbed the future of our nation, yet the educational system rarely puts in the time, effort and money to educate this demographic as effectively as it could. In fact, those at the front of the public education movement often regard early childhood education as an afterthought – after the more important issues like school choice, student performance and educational standards.
 
A report by the New American Foundation called attention to the educational plight of our young in a report in CCW that stated pre-kindergarten education has "long been the poor stepchild of the education system, with fewer . . . read more

According to the Autism Society of America (ASA), the number of diagnosed autistic children in the United States has been growing significantly in the last several decades. 
 
In fact, as reported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, their 2007 study confirmed that approximately 1 out of every 150 children will be diagnosed with autism. This rise in cases adds to the nearly 1.5 million Americans who are currently coping with the effects of autism spectrum disorder. 
 
Due to the rising need of autism support, community colleges have created a variety of autism training programs to help students specialize in helping autistic children. As ASA supports, “The spotlight shown on autism as a result of the prevalence increase opens opportunities for the nation to consider how to serve these families facing a lifetime of supports for their children.” 
 
What is Autism?
 
Autism spectrum disorder is a highly complex developmental disability that typically influences how a child thinks, behaves, and interprets various interactions. Labeled as a “spectrum disorder,” autism has an incredibly vast range of symptoms and signals. 
 
Typically, children with autism will begin to show signs of this disorder within the first three years of their lives. Since autism is not a short term condition, but a lifetime component of a child’s life and thinking process, there is no quick cure for this disorder. 
 
Furthermore, since scientists are unsure as to what the exact cause of autism really is, experts assert that parents with autistic children must work with their unique child’s needs and abilities in . . . read more

Whether the economy is growing or recessionary, teaching is often considered to be one of the most stable careers. While teaching salaries and wages vary from state to state, most teaching positions tend to hold strongly amidst times of economic turmoil. Additionally, teaching often allows educators to pursue alternative careers and interests during the summer vacation season. 
 
While teaching certainly offers an array of challenges and obstacles, many assert that the seasonal freedom and job security offer positive incentives for interested adults. With these perks and benefits, earning a teaching certification in community college may be a safe and strong professional move. 
 
Benefits of Earning a Teaching Certification
 
As the Birmingham Mail reveals in their article “Teaching Offers More Secure Path in Troubled Times,” the average number of people now considering pursuing careers in education has gone up nearly 34 percent in the past year. As the economy encounters unstable bouts of turmoil, a rising number of professionals and students are seeking out the potential advantages of a teaching’s job security. 
 
Interested candidates should seek out local or national scholarships and job offerings. For example, areas of high-need will often pay for a teacher’s training and certification program if he or she agrees to work in that particular region for a certain period of time. Specifically, many inner city schools or rural schools are considered to be “high need,” as their rate of student success paired with their high teacher turnover rates lead to a school’s overall struggle to thrive and flourish. By agreeing to teach . . . read more
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