Healthcare Careers | CommunityCollegeReview.com

Recession-proof and rewarding, healthcare careers can be started right from community college. Here you’ll identify the hottest trends in health care degrees, earn how to become an emergency technician and read why community college is a great place to start your addiction counseling degree.
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The health care industry is one of the hottest, in terms of employment and job stability, this year. The really good news is that many of the in-demand positions in health care can be landed with a two-year degree from your local community college. Check out these top 10 healthcare careers you can move into with a community college degree.
 
Dental Hygienist
Dental hygienists assist dentists in their offices, educating patients and providing cleaning and preventative care. According to a report in U.S. News and World Report, the average annual salary for these professionals is around $68,000, and many only work part time. You can launch your career as a dental hygienist with a two-year degree at your local community college. Many schools feature dental laboratories, where students work with actual patients for practical, hands-on experience. In some states, hygienists must also pass an examination to practice, but community colleges often provide the preparation and opportunities for testing as part of the degree program.
 
Medical Laboratory Technician
This medical professional performs routine laboratory tests for diagnostic and monitoring purposes. Tests might include blood and urine tests, as well as examinations of tissue and other bodily fluids. Medical laboratory technicians typically work in the lab of a hospital, according to the website for the MHA Health Careers Center. They might also work in the laboratories of public health clinics, universities and biomedical companies. The average annual salary for a medical laboratory technician is around $32,000, and job . . . read more

For students looking to enter the workforce with a two-year degree under their belts, the medical field is an excellent one to consider. Many positions within this industry can be started with an associate degree, and the number of job openings and growth potential give these hot healthcare jobs some of the best value for your higher education dollar. Check out these top 10 health fields you can enter after spending just two years earning your degree.

Dental Hygienist
 
Most people have a closer relationship with the dental hygienist than the dentist, since this is the professional who spends the most time with patients. Hygienists go far beyond simple teeth cleaning, including assisting dentists with some surgical procedures, taking x-rays and educating patients on proper dental care. According to U.S. News and World Report, dental hygienists can expect to make an annual average salary of $68,200 and enjoy a projected job growth in their industry of around 38 percent.
 
Medical Sonographer
 
Medical sonographers use ultrasound technology to help physicians diagnose a wide range of disorders and illnesses. Sonographers are responsible for taking the ultrasound pictures and determining which photos will be most helpful to the physician making the final diagnosis. This position is heavily patient-oriented, so it is well suited to those who enjoy working with others. Allhealthcare.com predicts that the job growth for medical sonographers should remain around 16 percent through 2016. Professionals in this field enjoy an average wage of $27 per hour.
 
ECG or EKG Technician   Medical . . . read more

Community colleges have become a popular place to jumpstart a new career, whether you are entering the professional workforce for the first time or looking to change career paths. One of the hottest degree trends at these two-year schools right now is health care, with plenty of choices in areas of study and ample job opportunities after graduation. You might work directly with patients or find an administrative position in the health care industry – and it all begins with training at your local community college.

Why Community College for Health Care?
 
Many interested in the field of health care make the mistake of thinking a four-year degree is necessary to land a well-paying job in the industry. However, a number of graduates who come into their jobs with two-year associate degrees can make excellent salaries with minimal training time. Some of the top jobs in health care requiring an associate degree can earn an average salary of $50,000 or more, and opportunities for advancement and salary increases are always possible. When you offset this salary change with education costs that are a fraction of what they would be at a four-year school, you can see why many are choosing the community college route to launch their health care careers.
 
Another advantage to choosing a community college for your health care degree is that there are many programs available. From administrative roles to jobs working directly with patients and other medical professionals, you can find a program that meets your needs . . . read more

Community colleges have become a popular place for students of all ages to get the training they need to move into a rewarding and lucrative career. Despite concerns over budget cuts and diminishing completion rates, a new report by Community College Week shows that many schools nationwide are continuing to churn out large numbers of graduates. One secret to higher completion rates appears to be the inclusion of the variety of health care degree programs in a school’s course catalogue. Although other industries are floundering in the current sluggish economy, health care continues to be a strong option for those looking for a recession-proof career.

What the Numbers Show
 
The current report by Community College Week shows that over the past decade, the number of associate degrees offered by community colleges in the health care field grew by an astonishing 111 percent. Certificates offered by community colleges in the health care industry grew by 240 percent during the same time frame. By the end of the 2009-2010 school year, community colleges across the country awarded more than 177,000 health care degrees alone.
 
The study conducted by Community College Week used data collected by the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), through the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data Set (IPEDS). According to the Community College Week website, while the information was complete for each college listed, all of the eligible colleges are not included on the current list. However, most of the schools not listed were relatively small . . . read more

The trend in the United States has gradually been moving from placing elderly patients in hospitals and long-term care facilities to allowing them to stay in their homes and communities for as long as possible. To achieve that goal, the role of the home caregiver has also expanded, with more need for these trained professionals than ever before. Home caregivers make regular trips to the homes of patients to help them live independently for as long as possible. While training for qualified caregivers has not kept up with demand, new training programs are cropping up at community colleges around the country to get more professionals into this rewarding career.
 
Jobs for Caregivers
 
According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, job growth for home caregivers and health aides is expected to increase exponentially as the demand for these professionals rises. Many caregivers work part-time evenings and weekends, while others find full-time employment. Some of the duties of a home caregiver might include:

  • Working with elderly or physically or mentally disabled patients to help them live independently
  • Helping patients recently discharged from hospitals as they recover from illness, injury or surgery
  • Providing psychological support and instruction to patients they visit
  • Performing light housekeeping duties like changing linens and cooking meals
  • Checking a patient's vital signs and keeping record of the results for doctors
  • Assisting patients with basic functions like bathing, grooming or dressing
Because many home caregivers must help patients get in and out of bed or get around their homes, the job can be physically demanding . . . read more
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HEALTHCARE CAREERS