How California Community Colleges Hope to Increase Graduation Rates by 2020

How California Community Colleges Hope to Increase Graduation Rates by 2020
California currently faces dismal graduation rates, but a new initiative hopes to increase graduation rates dramatically by 2020.
Last year, President Obama announced his ambitious plan to graduate five million more students from community colleges by the year 2020. The President believes this goal is necessary to ensure the United States can continue to be leaders in a global economy, according to a report at WhiteHouse.gov. However, boosting graduation rates at community colleges across the country may be easier said than done. To facilitate the process, California has developed a list of recommendations to increase graduation rates in that state, which could serve as a model for other states as well.
 
Room for Improvement
 
According to a report on Southern California Public Radio, there is plenty of room for improvement in California community colleges today. A study conducted by California State University, Sacramento, found that seven of every 10 students do not complete a two-year degree or transfer to a four-year institution. Long Beach City College President Eloy Ortiz Oakley told the radio station, "We need to rapidly improve the education of our workforce, and community colleges are the gateway to the majority of that workforce in California."
 
Finding Solutions
To help achieve that end, the Community College League of California has issued recommendations for community colleges to follow. The report, titled, "Commission on the Future's 2020 Vision for Student Success," outlines 17 recommendations designed to increase student graduation rates across the board. League president Scott Lay told KPBS that the purpose of the report is to make community colleges more structured.
 
"Having mandatory orientation sessions, mandatory assessments and guidance of students," Lay said, "These are some of the practice changes that in many colleges it's already happening, our goal is to bring it to scale throughout the entire system." Since many students drop out of community colleges today due to lack of adequate guidelines, Lay is hopeful that more structure within the framework of the college will lead to betterstudent retention and higher graduation rates.
 
Commission Recommendations

The 17 recommendations issued by the league fall into four categories and include a variety of modifications and improvements:
 
Leadership and accountability

  • A visible, high level of leadership across districts and colleges
  • A student record system that monitors student progress from elementary school through post-secondary education and into the workplace
  • Research that focuses on teaching, learning and student success
  • Requirements should be assessed to ensure they lead to student success and increased course completions
  • Professional development of faculty and staff should be directed at improving student success

Intense student support

  • Students should be required to participate in support programs
  • Community college expectations should be clearly defined through a statewide initiative

Teaching and learning

  • Develop an enhanced Basic Skills funding model that tracks student progress and ensures all students have basic skills needed for success
  • Develop alternatives to traditional curriculum sequences using linked or alternative sequences when appropriate
  • Establish transfer asociate degrees that guarantee admission to four-year universities with junior standing
  • Coordinate class schedules between college departments to meet the needs of first-time students and promote program completion
  • Expand the awarding of credit for demonstrated competency and knowledge
  • Encourage faculty to demonstrate knowledge of effective teaching technique
Finance and affordability
  • Create incentive funding that distributes money based on student performance and institution success
  • Maintain moderate and predictable increases in enrollment fees
  • Institutional financial aid should be aligned with federal criteria for financial aid

By addressing all four of these categories, the commission hopes to achieve a post-secondary education environment that promotes equity, access and success. Colleges that follow this prescription should be able to effectively close the achievement gap often seen through ethnicity and social class. They should be able to increase access of their institutions to more residents of the state seeking higher education. In doing so, the league hopes to increase college completions in California by one million by the year 2020.
 
About the Community College League of California
The CCLC is a non-profit organization committed to promoting student access and success by strengthening colleges across the state, according to the organization's website. The league's Commission on the Future was specifically created to study effective ways to increase college graduation rates with policy and practice changes that could conceivably be implemented by 2020. These efforts are in line with the White House requirement to increase graduation rates at community colleges within 10 years.
 
The state of California has seen an increase in community college enrollment currently, as laid off workers are heading back to school to get retraining to return to the workforce. The 112 institutions across the state are exploring ways to help these students remain in their post-secondary education roles until they receive the degrees or certification necessary to see success in the new marketplace.

Additional Resources [+]
The Catch-22 of Community College Graduation Rates
The Catch-22 of Community College Graduation Rates
New National Initiative Designed to Ramp Up Graduation Rates
New National Initiative Designed to Ramp Up Graduation Rates
comments powered by Disqus
Recent Articles
Federal Student Loans – Unavailable at 20% of Community Colleges
Federal Student Loans – Unavailable at 20% of Community Colleges
Although a community college education is inexpensive when compared to tuition and fees at a four-year institution, some students still need financial assistance to pay their education bills. Yet, some community colleges don’t participate in the federal student loan program, putting some students in a financial bind.
Post-Recession Cliff Looms for Community Colleges
While many factors have contributed to the current decline in community college enrollment, the recovering economy is chief among them. As more and more people return to the workforce, fewer students enroll in courses at community colleges. Many institutions must now deal with budget shortfalls in the face of double-digit declines in enrollment.
4 Indispensable Tips for Surviving Your 1st Semester of Community College
This summer will be wrapping up before we know of it, and your first semester at community college is rapidly approaching. Are you ready for it?

Get Your Degree!

Find schools and get information on the program that’s right for you.

Powered by Campus Explorer

Student Issues / Attending College

GRADUATION

Graduation rates, policies, and caps - oh my! This section covers all topics related to community college graduations. How does state spending impact graduation rates? Who are the oldest community college graduates? What initiatives are in place to stem the rate of dropouts? Find the answers to these questions and more.