Kick Your Dead End Job and Find New Opportunities with a Community College Degree

Published |
Kick Your Dead End Job and Find New Opportunities with a Community College Degree
For those who want to explore a career with growth potential, we introduce several high demand jobs that can be jump-started at community college.
Ready to kick your dead end job in favor of more lucrative prospects? A community college degree might be just the ticket. Many of the jobs in the U.S. that were hot at the end of the 20th century are barely simmering today. Now might be the perfect time to make a career change with the help of the two-year school in your area. Check out these jobs gaining ground and alternatives that might put you back on a positive career track once again.
 
Desktop Publisher
This job was a hot one at the end of the last century, as many small business owners turned to pros to turn out their marketing material and newsletters. However, new and improved software has made the job significantly easier, which makes the job of the desktop publisher less cost-effective today. Some companies are also outsourcing this type of work to save a buck. According to Yahoo Finance, this field is expected to decline by more than 14 percent over the next decade, as businesses turn to other sources for their publishing needs.
 
Instead of stagnating in the fading world of desktop publishing, Yahoo Finance suggests an alternative career in drafting. Drafting takes you from published designs to manufacturing designs, creating technical drawings and plans for everything from the cardboard holder for your coffee cup to full-size building structures. Many community colleges across the country offer two-year degree programs to help you launch a new drafting career. Average annual pay for drafters is...
read more

Published |
Planning Ahead: Choosing the Community College Degree with the Best Career Potential
We analyze 10 of the top community college degrees that provide excellent future professional potential.
If you are looking for a job with serious career potential for the 21st century, a community college might be just the place to start. Two-year schools offer a wealth of degree options for in-demand industries for the local workforce and beyond. Check out these 10 community college degrees with excellent future potential.
 
Plumber
Plumbing may not be the first thing you think of when you are considering lucrative careers for the 21st century, but guess what? This industry is predicted to grow by more than 25 percent over the next 10 years, according to Yahoo Finance. The average annual salary can go up to more than $67,000 as well. While some enter the plumbing industry through an apprenticeship or on-the-job experience, an associate degree from a local community college could sweeten the pot on the employment front.
 
Veterinary Technician
If you love animals, a career as a veterinary technician might be the perfect choice. These professionals work alongside veterinarians, offering support with regular checkups, performing diagnostic examinations and assisting during surgery. A two-year degree from the right community college can launch your career in this growing field. According to Money Crashers, the projected growth for veterinary technicians over the next 10 years is around 35 percent, with an average annual salary of $30,000.
 
Diagnostic Medical Sonographer
These healthcare professionals utilize ultrasound equipment to screen and diagnose a number of conditions. As this technology has grown and evolved to encompass a large number of diagnostic purposes, the need for medical sonographers has...
read more

Published |
Four-Year Degrees at Community College? Many Schools Now Say Yes
What is the latest on four-year degree programs at community colleges? We look at some of the states entering into this relatively new frontier, and why some are having a tough time selling the idea.
Community colleges have traditionally been considered the go-to place for two-year vocational degrees or general college coursework for students that have plans to transfer to a four-year college or university. However, these institutions of higher education are increasing their program offerings to include a smattering of four-year degree options as well. Although not without their share of opposition, the four-year degree is slowly but surely becoming more common at the community college level. Check out these states and schools delving into the frontier of the four-year degree program.
 
Chattanooga State Considers Addition of Five Four-Year Programs
 
A community college in Tennessee is looking at adding five new programs to their current catalog selections. The Chattanoogan reports that Chattanooga State Community College is considering the addition of four-year degree programs in a variety of high-tech fields. The president of the college, Dr. Jim Cantanzaro, applied for approval of the programs last summer, and is still waiting for a response from Tennessee Board of Regents.
 
The community college would like to add four-year degree programs in chemical process engineering, radiological sciences, nuclear engineering, technology management, and mechatronics engineering. The programs were specifically chosen based on the local employment needs of the current workforce. Dr. Cantanzaro made it clear the goal of the program addition was to fulfill those professional needs and not to transform Chattanooga State in a full-fledged four-year school.
 
Dr. Cantanzaro also explained that 60 percent of the material in the new degree programs would be “applied,” meaning the...
read more

Published |
Community College Enrollment in California Hit 20-Year Low
We’ll examine the reasons behind California’s dismal community college enrollment numbers, at a time when the state needs skilled workers more than ever.
While many community colleges across the country are bursting at the seams with their increasing enrollment numbers, California schools appear to be seeing the opposite trend. The largest community college system in the U.S. is currently experiencing a 20-year low in enrollment, leaving many scratching their heads as to the cause of the decline. As the system continues to struggle to lure students, many wonder if it is the higher cost, fewer classes or poor track record that is leaving these schools lacking for students.
 
The Student Shut-Out
 
According to a report at KQED, around 600,000 community college students have been shut out of the state’s system in recent years. Budget cuts that have led to fewer course selections have contributed to the student shut-out. In addition, KQED reports on recent findings in a report by the Public Policy Institute of California, which showed a total community college student population of 2.4 million during the 2011-2012 school year. That number marks a significant decrease in enrollment from the 2.9 million students enrolled in state community colleges during 2008-2009.
 
Sarah Bohn, the lead researcher for the PPIC report, told KQED the results were “troubling.” She makes note of the fact that fewer students are pursuing higher education at a time when California requires more skilled workers to beef up its high-tech industries. It is particularly concerning considering more students are graduating from California high schools than ever before, leading some researchers to wonder whether those high school graduates are attending any...
read more

Published |
A Degree Program sans Textbooks? One Community College Says Yes
We report on a first-of-its-kind degree program introduced by Tidewater Community College that is 100 percent textbook-free. We also explore ways to save on textbook costs – for students that don’t live near the Tidewater campus.
College is a pricy endeavor today, but at least one community college is looking for a way to help students cut the cost of a college education. Tidewater Community College in Virginia has announced plans to debut a textbook-free degree program next year. College officials estimate the pilot program could cut the cost of the degree by as much as a third by the time graduation rolls around.
 
Learning Business without Textbooks
 
The Richmond-Times Dispatch reports that Tidewater Community College will be offering an associate of science degree in business administration this fall that will require no textbook purchases throughout the program. Instead, students will use open-source educational materials, known as OER, which they will be able to access through the school’s learning management system on smart phones or tablets. The college will be the first to offer a complete degree program without any textbooks required.
 
The program was developed as a partnership between Tidewater Community College and Lumen Learning; an Oregon-based company that helps schools across the country incorporate OERs into their learning plans. The founder of Lumen, David Wiley, has advocated for open-education for the past 15 years, according to The Chronicle of Higher Education. However, no school has been open to the concept of a completely textbook-free degree program until now.
 
“It’s frustrating to watch these resources keep getting created, and then watch nobody use them and the students get no benefit,” Wiley stated at The Chronicle of Higher Education.
 
The Textbook Zero Model
 
The company developed the first...
read more
View Pages:<<Prev  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9  Next>>
Recent Articles
Community College Review Diversity Report: Which Campuses are Most Diverse?
Community College Review Diversity Report: Which Campuses are Most Diverse?
What states are home to the most diverse and least diverse community colleges? In our exclusive diversity report, we analyze our data to determine how much diversity there is on community college campuses throughout the United States. In addition, learn about the benefits of attending a community college with a diverse student body.
More Accreditation Woes for California
The chancellor of the California Community College System, Bryce Harris, recently stated more than 20 community colleges in the state were at risk of losing accreditation. In the midst of problems with City College of San Francisco, some are beginning to question the credibility of the accreditors.
Washington Monthly Rates Community Colleges in 2013 Ranking
We take a look at the latest annual college rankings from Washington Monthly, which provide a list of the top community colleges in the country as well as four-year schools.